Freedom: A History of US.
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Webisode 14: 1955-1963 Page: 1 | 2

Martin Luther King, Jr.
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Martin Luther King, Jr.
Martin Luther King, Jr. is shown here at the height of his powers.



Morehouse College
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Morehouse College
When he attended Morehouse College in downtown Atlanta, Martin Luther King, Jr. was following in his father's footsteps. Morehouse was the favorite school of Atlanta's black middle class. Here is the college's Graves Hall.


Rosa Parks
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Rosa Parks
Here is Rosa Parks in 1964, eight years after she was catapulted into national attention by her refusal to give up her seat on a Montgomery bus to a white person. "It just happened that the driver made a demand," she recalled, "and I just didn't feel like obeying his demand."


Rosa Parks Arrested
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Rosa Parks Arrested
Here Rosa Parks is being fingerprinted three months after being arrested for not giving up her bus seat to a white man. Rosa's arrest in 1955 was the catalyst for the Montgomery bus boycott which lasted more than a year. During that time the bus company lost two-thirds of its income.


Boycott Headline
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Boycott Headline
This article from the MONTGOMERY ADVERTISER announces the start of the bus boycott.


Violence to a Black Man
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Violence to a Black Man
During the period of the bus boycott, a black man is surrounded by antagonistic whites.


Education Without Mixing
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"Education Without Mixing"
A parade of cars filled with young whites in the 1950s leads a demonstration protesting the coming of integration in the schools.


Governor Orval Faubus
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Governor Orval Faubus
Governor Orval Faubus of Arkansas appeals to Little Rock voters to back his stance against integration in the schools.


Dwight D. Eisenhower
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Dwight D. Eisenhower
A staunch believer in states' rights, President Eisenhower at first resisted the idea of a federal intervention into Little Rock. But with the Arkansas Governor in direct violation of a federal court order, and with violence erupting on the streets outside the high school, the President had no choice. On September 23 he ordered U.S. troops into Little Rock. By afternoon 500 paratroopers of the 101st Airborne Division had arrived, with another 500 joining them by nightfall. Throughout the southern states there went out cries of "invasion." Not since the period of Reconstruction had federal soldiers intervened in the affairs of the South.


Students Escorted
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Students Escorted
Here a group of black students is escorted into Little Rock High School. The picture was taken in December 1957 after the last of the 101st Airborne had pulled out of Little Rock. The troopers escorting the students here are members of the state militia, now under federal control.



Continue to: Images 11-20
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