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I Puritani
Posted: March 13th, 2008
  • comments (3)

Russian soprano Anna Netrebko, who has taken the opera world by storm since her American debut in 1995, now inhabits the role of the fragile Elvira in Bellini’s final work, I PURITANI, the tale of love and madness set during the English Revolution. With its vocal fireworks and opportunities for real acting, this has been a supreme role for great singing actresses from Maria Callas to Beverly Sills and among its hallmarks is one of opera’s wildest mad scenes when Elvira is abandoned at the altar.

I PURITANI airs for SundayArts on May 4, 2008.

  • Roberet Kirk

    This is a beautiful production, and Anna Netrebko restored my faith that there are still great actors out there doing opera. The scene of her laying on the stage doing part of the mad scene is truly priceless. In some ways this is better than being in the house because you can see the expressions on their faces.

  • David Howard

    To Mr. Kirk: Lying, not laying. Look it up. Otherwise, I agree entirely. Also, many thanks to the producers and funders for recording and broadcasting these performances.

  • Hank M

    I MISSED THE PERORMANCE OF I PURITANI. CAN I DOWNLOAD IT FROM SOMEWHERE – SOMETIME?

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SundayArts is made possible in part by First Republic Bank and by the Rubin Museum of Art. Funding for SundayArts is also made possible by Rosalind P. Walter, The Paul and Irma Milstein Foundation, The Philip & Janice Levin Foundation, Elise Jaffe and Jeffrey Brown, Jody and John Arnhold, and The Lemberg Foundation. This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Additional funding provided by members of THIRTEEN.