SundayArts is Now NYC-ARTS
video archive NYC-ARTS.org
Preview of Craft in America: Origins
Posted: October 6th, 2009
  • comments (3)

The American craft tradition didn’t just appear one day, fully-formed and mature. Whatever their materials – no matter how “cutting edge” – every artist can trace her or his work to craft techniques that had their beginnings hundreds, even thousands, of years ago. When they are manifested and revealed to us they’re sometimes easy to see. Sometimes they require us to make the effort. But each artist is involved in taking and passing these techniques to others in a continuum of creativity.

Since the beginning of recorded time, human beings have made objects. Most, such as tools, cooking utensils, blankets and clothing, served a simple, utilitarian function. If they performed well, appearance was unimportant. But even here, we see glimpses of artistry, when the makers wanted – needed – to put a personal imprint on the objects they made.

Consider the simplest of tools – a hand axe. And let’s consider it even further, as a tool that takes abuse in its everyday usage, chopping wood, cutting up prey, and all-around whacking – when it was multi-functional, the Swiss Army knife of its day. If that’s all it was, then we’d have little interest in it as anything other than an example of form and function working, if you will, hand-in-hand.

  • joseph rosen

    Today’s progarm of Oct. 11, 09 included a Calif. print maker who so doing contemporary prints influnced by Japenese prints- I would appreciate it if you could tell me his name.
    thank you,
    joseph rosen

  • Josef Sieghart

    Today’s program, 10/11/09, included a woman book printer – who had designed several spectacularly unusual books; one on the planets, one based on mathematical equations and one I believe, called “True to Life”. Could you please tell me her name. Thank you.
    Josef Sieghart

  • jim redding

    Mr. Rosen the artists name is TOM KILLION. His work is breathtaking

sunday arts footer

SundayArts is made possible in part by First Republic Bank and by the Rubin Museum of Art. Funding for SundayArts is also made possible by Rosalind P. Walter, The Paul and Irma Milstein Foundation, The Philip & Janice Levin Foundation, Elise Jaffe and Jeffrey Brown, Jody and John Arnhold, and The Lemberg Foundation. This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Additional funding provided by members of THIRTEEN.