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Posts Tagged : painting

Designer Oscar de la Renta and fashion editor Andre Leon Talley discuss the exhibit "Joaquín Sorolla and the Glory of Spanish Dress" at the Queen Sofia Spanish Institute, which analyzes the history of Spain’s regional clothing styles through the paintings of Valencian artist Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida.

Philippe de Montebello explores the Metropolitan Museum of Art's collection of 19th and 20th Century European paintings and sculpture.

Melissa Chiu sits down with the artist Chuck Close. Born in Monroe, Washington in 1940, Close started his career at the age of 5. He embarked on a diverse creative path, making a major breakthrough on the New York art scene of the 1960s. Close developed his own distinctive photorealist style, embodied in the massive-scale [...]

The new play Red is to 20th Century Art what Colonial Williamsburg is to the Revolutionary War: a warm, fuzzy, simulacrum that makes a complex era accessible.  Instead of taking audiences inside an 18th Century Southern plantation, John Logan’s one-act play takes them inside the studio of Abstract Expressionist painter Mark Rothko.

My visit to the 2010 Whitney Biennial coincided with reading Don Delillo’s brief novel, Point Omega. Moving through the Biennial’s many galleries, I couldn’t stop thinking about the author’s descriptions of watching Douglas Gordon’s 24 Hour Psycho (the film Psycho slowed down to run over 24 hours) or the protagonist’s interactions with other gallery viewers, [...]

Two of last century’s revered artists are having major shows in New York at the same moment: Georgia O’Keeffe (1887-1986) at the Whitney, and Vasily Kandinsky (1866-1944) at the Guggenheim. The coincidence of the two exhibitions offer some interesting parallels and divergences, not to mention a look at a wealth of revolutionary artwork that altered [...]

If Francis Bacon’s (1909-1992) artwork were a movie, it would no doubt captivate that mythical “ideal” demographic—males 18-49. His work is scary, brutal, graphic, hallucinogenic, and muscular, like so many blockbuster films nowadays. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. That’s partly why the Met’s retrospective of the British artist seems in tune with the [...]

Yayoi Kusama, born in 1929, has been a fixture in contemporary art circles for decades, and rightly so. Her obsessive canvases (“infinity nets”) and humorous, eye popping installations allow her work to traverse the verdant median between rigorous abstraction and loosely knit narrative. That her personal backstory, dealing with dark psychologial impulses and obsessiveness, manifests [...]

It’s hard enough for anyone to make sense of historical events as they unfold, but imagine trying to create art out of them. That is, of course, what  political artists try to do, though not without the danger of succumbing to tendentiousness. For the past three decades, however, Jenny Holzer has managed to avoid this [...]

Impressionism occupies a funny space between bourgeois blah and revolution. A Monet can come across as genre-changing or as wallpaper; a Degas, visionary or musty, depending on the viewer’s mood. This is one of the more intriguing aspects of the movement—the Trojan horse aspect in which it brought pivotal change to modern art while often [...]

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SundayArts is made possible in part by First Republic Bank and by the Rubin Museum of Art. Funding for SundayArts is also made possible by Rosalind P. Walter, The Paul and Irma Milstein Foundation, The Philip & Janice Levin Foundation, Elise Jaffe and Jeffrey Brown, Jody and John Arnhold, and The Lemberg Foundation. This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Additional funding provided by members of THIRTEEN.