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SundayArts News 10/17/2010
Posted: October 18th, 2010
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America’s Earliest Bibles
A new exhibit at the Museum of Biblical Art examines the history of the bible in the New World. “A Light to the Nations: America’s Earliest Bibles (1532-1864)” showcases a selection of materials from The Rare Bible Collection @ MoBiA. The exhibition explores the efforts of early settlers to meet the needs of newly established Christian communities in the Americas and shows how publishing strategies and marketing tactics were created in the process. One of the highlights is “The Polyglot Psalter,” which was published in 1516 and includes the first biography of Christopher Columbus ever to be printed.

Spectral Scriabin
On October 25 the Baryshnikov Arts Center presents the world premiere of an unusual music work. It was written almost a century ago by Russian composer Alexander Scriabin for a very unusual instrument, the clavier à lumières, an organ whose keys would produce colors. The Georgian pianist Eteri Andjaparidze and the American lighting designer Jennifer Tipton started from Scriabin’s concept and created their own rendering of it. The show “Spectral Scriabin” merges the composer’s passionate and mystical music with an intricate color and light interplay to create a unique performance.

Poems of the Right Angle
The Drawing Center, located in SoHo, is the only not-for-profit fine arts institution in the country to focus solely on the exhibition of drawings. Through November 18, its galleries host the works of two German artists. “Gerhard Richter: Lines Which Do Not Exist” presents approximately 50 graphite, watercolor, and ink on paper drawings made from 1966 to 2005. Richter is known world-wide as a painter, but his drawing practice remains relatively opaque and enigmatic. This exhibition allows previously unexplored connections to emerge between his different types of drawings. “Claudia Wieser: Poems of the Right Angle” is the first solo museum exhibition in North America of this Berlin-based artist. As part of a site-specific installation, colorful line drawings are placed against the backdrop of a black and white wallpaper that creates the sensation of immersion in a futurist painting. With their precise geometry, the works lead the viewer into contemplative spaces where the primacy of mark-making and viewing become fused.

A Brief Encounter
A new incarnation of the play “Brief Encounter,” this time at Studio 54 on Broadway, continues to receive critical acclaim. This imaginative production combines elements of Noël Coward’s screenplay about a fateful love affair and of “Still Life,” the short play on which it was based, with song, dance and technicolor displays of emotion. This breakout hit from London’s Kneehigh Theatre, adapted and directed by Emma Rice, has a limited engagement through December 5th.

The Merchants of Bollywood
Love is also in the air in “The Merchants of Bollywood,” a dance and theatre extravaganza at Caesars Palace in Atlantic City. Its plot is loosely based on the real-life story of the merchant family dynasty, whose members have been prominent choreographers and filmmakers since the 1920s. A classic tale of generational conflict and artistic dreams, this dance and theatre show celebrates Bollywood’s high energy delights. It features fifty performers, 500 lavish costumes and 3,000 pieces of glittering jewelry.

Wave Rising
By contrast, the Wave Rising Series started in 2006 as a platform for companies that could not afford to stage full productions of new dance works. Its 5th annual edition features 19 dance companies that will present new choreography and established repertoire at WHITE WAVE John Ryan Theater, in DUMBO. The Wave Rising Series runs from October 20 through November 7 and features local companies as well as innovative dancemakers from around the world.

  • george paris

    nice news

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SundayArts is made possible in part by First Republic Bank and by the Rubin Museum of Art. Funding for SundayArts is also made possible by Rosalind P. Walter, The Paul and Irma Milstein Foundation, The Philip & Janice Levin Foundation, Elise Jaffe and Jeffrey Brown, Jody and John Arnhold, and The Lemberg Foundation. This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Additional funding provided by members of THIRTEEN.