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SUNDAYARTS BLOG

As if it weren’t enough doing eight Fionas a week in Shrek on Broadway, Sutton Foster has squeezed in two Monday evenings this month at Feinstein’s at the Regency. I missed her February performance in Lincoln Center’s “American Songbook” series, so I made it over to Feinstein’s for the first of these, which took place [...]

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Many of the top dance companies have second troupes that serve as farm teams. They develop young talent, allowing time for technique to deepen and providing invaluable stage experience. This seems to be the New York season for the “twos,” what with runs by ABT II, Ailey II, and NDT II taking place within weeks [...]

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At a concert this winter, I ran into a friend, a practicing lawyer who also holds a degree in music. She admits she is baffled by classical music reviews and wanted to know, “What is the point of music criticism, anyway?” Um … what is the POINT? I was aghast. As someone who devours music [...]

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At a concert this winter, I ran into a friend, a practicing lawyer who also holds a degree in music. She admits she is baffled by classical music reviews and wanted to know, “What is the point of music criticism, anyway?”

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Red Fly/Blue Bottle, the title of a music-theater show at HERE, recurs in a memorable song that bookends the work. Christina Campanella wrote the haunting, melodious music, with words by Stephanie Fleischmann; Mallory Catlett directs. Old meets new in the Jim Findlay-designed set that resembles an attic, dense with antique clocks, audio/visual equipment, insect imagery. [...]

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Horse, the male troupe from Taiwan presented by Eliot Feld’s Mandance Project, performed two evenings at the Joyce Theater recently. Wedged among eleven shows of Feld repertory, the evenings have in common the dancers Wu-Kang Chen and Wei-Chia Su. The company performed the US premiere of Bones, an austere work that edges away from a [...]

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It’s hard enough for anyone to make sense of historical events as they unfold, but imagine trying to create art out of them. That is, of course, what  political artists try to do, though not without the danger of succumbing to tendentiousness. For the past three decades, however, Jenny Holzer has managed to avoid this [...]

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Impressionism occupies a funny space between bourgeois blah and revolution. A Monet can come across as genre-changing or as wallpaper; a Degas, visionary or musty, depending on the viewer’s mood. This is one of the more intriguing aspects of the movement—the Trojan horse aspect in which it brought pivotal change to modern art while often [...]

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If you visit McGovern’s website, the first thing you’ll see is a header in huge, red, loopy script, “THE STRADIVARIUS VOICE.” At about the same moment, you will will be hit with the sound of that instantly recognizable voice ringing out—her cover of a Bob Dylan tune, “The Times They are a-Changin’.” That song is [...]

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Aside from the thorny subject of race, there’s perhaps been no other aspect of the national culture more contested and argued over than the American West. Even before the spread of photography, dime novels and steel engravings transmitted legends of gamblers and gunslingers, and indigenous natives who were at once noble and bloodthirsty. But it [...]

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SundayArts is made possible in part by First Republic Bank and by the Rubin Museum of Art. Funding for SundayArts is also made possible by Rosalind P. Walter, The Paul and Irma Milstein Foundation, The Philip & Janice Levin Foundation, Elise Jaffe and Jeffrey Brown, Jody and John Arnhold, and The Lemberg Foundation. This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Additional funding provided by members of THIRTEEN.
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