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SUNDAYARTS BLOG

Sometimes it is easy, for me anyway, to dedicate the rare and all-too-precious resources of my free time—the time I am not working, the time wherein I go to concerts, movies, take walks, etc.—to events that are not musical.  Every few weeks or so I see a film (though sadly of late I’ve only seen [...]

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Gaff Aff, the first performance in the newly renovated Jerome Robbins Theater at the Baryshnikov Arts Center after the Wooster Group’s North Atlantic, defies genres. It’s tempting to call the work (through May 8th) by the Swiss duo of Zimmerman and de Perrot dance, but there isn’t any, at least along familiar lines—it’s more movement [...]

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For devotees of new music, the past few weeks have presented almost too many choices in New York. The predominant composer is probably Louis Andriessen, the focus of events at Carnegie Hall over the span from April 9 to May 10—covered by fellow SundayArts bloggers Daniel Felsenfeld and James C. Taylor. But there were also [...]

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This Friday and Saturday, New York City Opera is running it’s annual VOX sequence, wherein ten American composers get their works read by the orchestra and singers of that amazing institution.  (I was fortunate enough to be part of it in 2004.) One of the pieces on Saturday is by Paola Prestini, who I think [...]

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Green Day’s American Idiot absolutely belongs on Broadway. The punk label always seemed somewhat disingenuous for this band, now 23 years old, that is cleaner, shinier, and more sentimental than punk would ever want to be. And Green Day’s songs, with Billie Joe Armstrong’s lyrics, have unnervingly infectious hooks, harmonies, and major chords to match [...]

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I used to joke that I learned all the history I knew through opera. Enlightenment? Mozart’s Le Nozze di Figaro. The Time of Troubles, 17th-century Russia? Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov. You get the picture. I’m pretty sure that as of this week, after seeing Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, a 90-minute musical in a limited run at the [...]

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If you follow “new music” at all, Dutch composer Louis Andriessen is the one not to miss.  In fact, I’d go as far as saying that if you follow it closely, he’s the composer in New York whom it is impossible to miss.  Turning 70 might just be the best move he ever made viz. [...]

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The Wooster Group‘s North Atlantic is a dense, corrugated, verbal and sensory assault. Cliché riddled, it begs for clichés to describe it—rapid-fire, pedal to the metal, take no prisoners. James Strahs wrote the play in 1982, and this production, directed by Elizabeth LeCompte, has been presented many times since its premiere two years later. The [...]

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Some theater works, like the new Addams Family musical (which I’ll talk about next week) seem tailor-made to appeal to the widest number of people. But one of the joys of New York is the ability to see equally professional productions of shows that seem tailor-made to offend or confuse most audiences. At Carnegie Hall [...]

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When you live in New York, frequently you suffer from the severest vertigo of possibilities, particularly when it comes to attending concerts, especially in the Spring.  So I leave you, dear readers, with a difficult choice as to how you are going to spend Tax Day, Thursday, April 15.  Perhaps you’ll be attending the New [...]

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SundayArts is made possible in part by First Republic Bank and by the Rubin Museum of Art. Funding for SundayArts is also made possible by Rosalind P. Walter, The Paul and Irma Milstein Foundation, The Philip & Janice Levin Foundation, Elise Jaffe and Jeffrey Brown, Jody and John Arnhold, and The Lemberg Foundation. This program is supported, in part, by public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council. Additional funding provided by members of THIRTEEN.