• Woody Allen’s New York
    This month, American Masters shines its spotlight on iconic writer, director, actor, comedian, and musician Woody Allen, who allowed his life and creative process to be documented on-camera for the first time in Woody Allen: A Documentary (Sunday, Nov. 20th and Monday, Nov. 21st at 9 p.m. on THIRTEEN). Director Robert Weide (HBO's Curb Your Enthusiasm, Lenny Bruce: Swear to Tell the Truth) followed the notoriously private film legend over a year and a half to create the ultimate film biography.

    Join THIRTEEN for a look at some of the most memorable New York moments in Allen's films. Then leave a comment below and tell us your favorite Woody Allen movie memory!
  • Greetings from Brooklyn
    Woody Allen grew up in the Midwood area of Brooklyn. "When I grew up, Brooklyn was a great place to live. There was very little traffic. You could stay out all day, playing ball in the street, and you couldn’t walk two blocks without coming to a movie house," he says in the new American Masters documentary directed by Robert Weide. Brooklyn features very prominently in Annie Hall (1977). Alvy Singer (Allen) grows up in a house beneath Coney Island’s Thunderbolt rollercoaster, his father works the bumper cars, and Alvy and Annie (Diane Keaton) first profess their love for each other on the pier in lower Manhattan against the backdrop of the Brooklyn Bridge.

    Photo: ©United Artists / Photofest
  • The Purple Rose of Kings County
    Mia Farrow plays a Depression-era waitress who's mad about the movies in The Purple Rose of Cairo (1985). While the film takes place in New Jersey, the theater where Cecilia (Farrow) sees the madcap comedy The Purple Rose of Comedy over and over again is named after The Jewel movie house in Brooklyn — one of the first movie houses in Allen's Brooklyn neighborhood to show foreign films. The theater scenes were actually filmed in the Kent Theatre on Coney Island Avenue in Flatbush, still operating today.

    Photo: ©Orion Pictures Corporation / Photofest
  • Broadway Baby
    In Bullets Over Broadway (1994), John Cusack (seen here with Dianne Wiest) is a playwright forced to cast a mobster's girlfriend (Jennifer Tilly) in his latest work. Allen's own experience as a Broadway playwright has been decidedly happier. His 1969 hit comedy Play It Again, Sam starred Diane Keaton and Tony Roberts, who would later appear in Annie Hall. His latest play, Honeymoon Hotel, is currently playing on Broadway as part of Relatively Speaking, a trilogy of one-acts penned by Allen, Elaine May and Ethan Coen and directed by John Turturro. It stars Julie Kavner, who has appeared in several Woody Allen films, including Radio Days, Hannah and Her Sisters, Deconstructing Harry, Alice, and New York Stories.
    Photo: ©Miramax Films / Photofest
  • Chapter One, He Adored New York City.
    Manhattan (1979) is the ultimate cinematic valentine to New York City, from the breathtaking opening montage with its Gershwin-infused flashes of Big Apple landmarks to the iconic shot of Allen and Diane Keaton sitting on a bench in front of the Queensboro Bridge. "I wanted to show New York in a very beautiful way, the way I see it," Allen says in the American Masters documentary. "I never had any interest in showing it except through my rose-colored glasses, my romanticized view of it."

    Photo: ©MGM / Brian Hamill
  • Radio City Days
    Manhattan is a dazzling mecca of all things glamorous in Radio Days (1987), Allen's tribute to The Golden Age of Radio. Recalling his mother's favorite radio show, Breakfast With Irene and Roger, Joe Needleman (Allen) says, "While my mother stood over the dirty plates in Rockaway, Irene and Roger ate their elegant breakfast over the air from their chic Manhattan townhouse while they chatted charmingly about the people and places we only dreamt of." And his memory of a Radio City movie date with his Aunt Bea (Dianne Wiest) and her boyfriend? "It was the first time I'd ever seen the Radio City Music Hall and it was like entering heaven. I just never saw anything so beautiful in my life."

    Photo: ©Getty Images / Brian Hamill
  • Go Tell It On Mount Sinai
    In Hannah and Her Sisters (1986), Allen plays a hypochondriacal TV producer who fears he has a brain tumor. After receiving a clean bill of health at Mount Sinai Hospital (Fifth Avenue and 101st Street in Manhattan), he quits his job, has an existential crisis, makes a failed suicide attempt, and rediscovers his joie de vivre while watching the classic Marx Brothers comedy Duck Soup.

    Photo: ©Orion Pictures / Photofest
  • Toy Story
    In Mighty Aphrodite (1995), sportswriter Lenny Weinrib (Woody Allen) and his wife (Helena Bonham-Carter) adopt a baby boy. Years later, they learn their highly intelligent son's biological mother is a prostitute and part-time porn star (Mira Sorvino). At the end of the movie, Lenny and Linda have a chance encounter at the famed New York City toy store FAO Schwarz.

    Photo: ©Getty Images / Tim Boyle
  • Murder and Mayhem
    Prime New York City locations abound in Manhattan Murder Mystery (1993), a hilarious whodunnit inspired by the classic Nick and Nora Thin Man movies. Allen plays a book editor whose office is located in the HarperCollins Building (10 East 53rd Street). The characters admire the beauty of Gramercy Park while attending a wine tasting at the legendary National Arts Club, and Larry (Allen) and Carol (Diane Keaton) take their son Nick (Zach Braff, in his film debut) to The 21 Club for his birthday. According to James Sanders' book Celluloid Skyline, "21" has been featured in more New York City movies than any other restaurant.

    Photo: ©Tri-Star / Photofest
  • A Broadway Danny Rose By Any Other Name...
    In Broadway Danny Rose (1984), Mia Farrow's character, Tina Vitale, was modeled after Annie Rao, the wife of Vincent Rao, original owner of the popular uptown Italian restaurant Rao's. Farrow and Allen dined at Rao's often, and Mrs. Rao would chat with them. "She always had the high blonde hair and smoked a cigarette and wore the sunglasses. She was a great character, a wonderful woman," Allen remarks in the American Masters documentary. "And Mia said to me, 'I'd love to play a woman like that sometime.'"

    Photo: ©MGM / Brian Hamill
  • Sweet and Hungover
    Chumley's, a former speakeasy on 86 Bedford Street in Greenwich Village, is featured in Sweet and Lowdown (1999), starring Sean Penn as the fictional 1930s jazz guitarist Emmet Ray. The Prohibition-era speakeasy was established in 1926 and became a popular hotspot for John Steinbeck, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Eugene O’Neill, Willa Cather, James Thurber, and other literary giants. It has been closed since the chimney in the dining room collapsed in 2007 and is expected to reopen in 2012. We'll drink to that!

    Photo: ©Sony Pictures Classics / Photofest
  • Woody Allen: A Documentary
    We hope you enjoyed the slideshow featuring iconic New York scenes from Woody Allen's films. Tune in to Woody Allen: A Documentary from American Masters on Sunday, Nov. 20th and Monday, Nov. 21st at 9 p.m. on THIRTEEN for an unprecedented inside look at his remarkable life and career. The film also airs Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 24 at 9:30pm.

    Watch previews and find out more about the film on the American Masters website.

    Everyone has a favorite Woody Allen film or film memory. What's yours? Share it below and read what others have to say.
  • BeninBrooklyn

    My favorite Woody Allen movie is Sleeper. I saw it was I was a kid and, even at 10 or 11 yrs old, thought it was wonderfully obsurd. I also saw Midnight in Paris which was great. First movie my wife and I had seen in a theater together in a year.

  • Bruce Eyster

    Woody Allen is the quentessential New Yorker ! I’ve loved his work as a stand up comic , writer , director and actor . Once , on tour with one of the many HAIR companies , we were booked in Spain for a year and the only two books , in English , we’d bothered to bring with us was The Fear Of Flying and With Out Feathers . You could always tell who was reading Mr. Allen’s With Out Feathers , because , you’d hear insane laughter, (usually at bed time ) coming from one of the rooms of one of the many hotels we inhabited, while on tour ! I was once very excited to see a movie being made by Mr.Allen on the Lower East Side and I spotted him crouched , in the back of a car near the shoot . He looked just like a charcter in one of his movies but it was obvious , to me , that he did not want to be disturbed or even recognized , which I respected and did not try to say hello or even convey how much I’ve enjoyed his work and sense of humor . I’ve also worked with Mary Boylan in Off Off Broadway and have a nodding aquaintance with a few character actors he’s employed over the years and they all sing his praises , as a brilliant man and a pleasure to work for and with . I’ve seen and read everything I could find on Mr. Allen ….my only regret is never having seen him perform live , as a comedian or a musician . He is definately one of my all time comedic geniuses and I hope he continues to work forever .

  • Bruce Eyster

    ( that last satement should have read :) He is one of my all time FAVORITE comedic geniuses and I hope he continues to work forever !

  • Paul Leone Peters

    I remember Woody’s standup act on Ed Sullivan and the Tonight Show, and that started the process. I saw “What’s Up, Tiger Lily,” and thought it was a brilliant concept. I loved “Take the Money and Run,” and — basically — nearly all of his movies since then. My favorite Woody Movie Moment was in “Bananas,” when he arrives at the airport disguised with the red beard and is assisted by a “translator” who simply speaks English with a heavy Spanish accent. Sheer genius and completely hysterical. But my real joy is that I share my addiction to Woody Allen with my best friend.

  • Roberta Hyman

    Our second apartment in Brooklyn was in Atlantic Towers in Sheepshead Bay. I used to put our baby son in the
    carraige and walk to Lundy’s for lunch at the outdoor counter. On Saturday nights my husband and I went to
    a coffee house called “PIPS” where Woody Allen was doing standup up comedy while his first wife sat to the
    side sipping coffee. We have been Woody Allen fans since then, the latest movie was Midnight in Paris,
    brilliant, poignant& funny . Fans from 1963 and forever. woody is a our favorite comedic genius.

  • Debbie Lackowitz

    There was something quintessential about growing up in New York. And that my friends was..Woody. His vision was a ‘snapshot’ of this wonderful City. It wasn’t always perfect. It never is. Yeah sometimes he missed. But when this man is on his game? Magic! I never got to see him do stand up. I was too young. But the movies? My favorites. First. Annie Hall. But most recent? Match Point. Vicki Christina Barcelona was also good. Thanks Woody for ALL you’ve done. I’m looking forward to the American Masters program!

  • Maria Bertolini

    I love Broadway Danny Rose, what a terrific movie. I love NYC and I love Woody.

  • Nancy

    I first saw him on the Merv Griffin show when I was in high school in Brooklyn where I grew up in a housing project. My friends and I thought he was hilarious. Bananas and Sleeper, screamingly funny. Even though his stepdaughter thing creeps me out, I still think he is at the top of the list of brilliant auteurs.

  • irene tricano

    i love him. ” Annie Hall ‘is my favorite movie … but then again they are all my favorite

  • Doris Goran Newman

    I hope the documentry will show the Carmen Miranda scene from Radio Days.

  • Bara from Brooklyn

    Each year I eagerly look forward to Woody’s newest movie. I love them all but think “Radio Days” may be my favorite – that and “Match Point” even though filmed in London. He captures the New York I love like no one else ever could. I’m going to tape the Sunday special.

  • June

    My favorite Woody scene is when he’s trying to hold up a bank….tellers can’t read his written note “this is a hold up”…js

  • Les_Heinberg

    1_word-
    1-scene-
    orgasmotron!
    I_still_laugh_just_writing_the_word.

  • Joyous Lee

    I love Woody so much.

  • Judith Burgevin Johnson

    We first saw Woody open for Lenny Bruce at the Roundtable. You might know the year?! He was young (as we were)
    and hilarious. “We” became “I” many years ago and I’m still following Woody’s delights. Just saw his Honeymoon Motel contribution to Relatively Speaking and howled with laughter. Thank you, Thirteen, and Woody Allen for years and years of pleasure in programing and film.

    • Eric Jenney

      Gee wiz, lady…you must be as old as the hills! XX PS. I miss you.

  • Mildred Zeitlin

    I’d love to see WoodyAllen’s Christina Barcelona– How do I do it?

  • Mildred Zeitlin

    Please let me know. Many thanks

  • chantal bareau

    As many French people, I love Woody. The first film I very young saw was “banana” in a little dull town in France in the early seventies ; I laughed so much that the town did not look so dull after that. My favorite film is Manhattan ; maybe that is why I live in Manhattan now! I of course love Midnight in Paris. The interest of Mr. Allen for Paris, the French culture and the French language that he speaks is a great honour. By the way, I tried to buy the Midnight in Paris DVD for a birthday to a friend… where can I find it ?
    I watched the first part of the documentary tonight. It was so interesting to see the house where he lived as a child and also his school, Brooklyn, his mother, his sister and his first steps on stage.
    I will not be able to see the second part tomorrow and I cannot register it. Will it be possible to watch it on your website. Thank you! Merci!

  • Roberta Kuehl

    Thank you Channel 13 for the incredibly informative and nostalgic documentary last night! I have been a fan of Woody’s for many years. I remember reading his book and uncontrollably laughing out loud on the subway.
    I saw both “Bananas” and “Annie Hall” 5 times; felt a kindred spirit with both Louise Lasser and Diane Keaton. Happily heard him play clarinet at Michael’s: excellent musician, but I resisted gushing and approaching him, since he seemed to like his solitude during the band’s break. Still moved by the beauty of “Manhattan.” Adored “Midnight in Paris.” Hysterically laughed during “Honeymoon Motel” in “Relatively Speaking”–what writing and what a cast! Keep us laughing, Woody!

  • yafa schlesinger

    I missed the show last night and today I heard abouot it from all the people I met. Everybody loved it.
    I am delighted to see that you repeat it and make sure to tape it.
    Yaffa shlesinger

  • Colette Flake-Bunz

    I love Woody Allen. I have seen all his films twice and am ready to see them a third time. I really do not have one favorite, but I liked Annie Hall, Manhattan, Vicky, Cristina, Barcelona and of course, Midnight in Paris. My friends and relatives in Paris, France, saw Midnight in Paris and they loved it. Thank you for the documetary. Quie interesting!

  • ODETTE FELTMAN

    I ENJOYED MOST OF HIS MOVIES BUT THE ONE THAT LEAVES A LASTING IMPRESSION IS INTERIORS. THE HOME FURNISHINGS SAID SOMETHING ABOUT THE FAMILY WITHOUT ANYONE SAYING A WORD.–HIS LATEST MOVIE MIDNIGHT IN PARIS WAS VISUALLY THE BEST AD FOR PARIS AND THE STORY WAS ENTERTAINING.–KEEP IT UP WOODY–YOU ARE A CREDIT TO A NEIGHBORHOOD THAT I GREW UP IN AND LOVED.

  • Carolyn Weddell

    Wish the documentary said more about his gut-wrenchingly hilarious short stories, e.g., “Mythical Beasts” and “If The Impressionists Had Been Dentists” (to name only two of many).

  • Jean Palley

    Last night’s documentary brought back the wonderful era of Woody’s stand-up comedy! It’s still great entertainment-
    ‘Midnight in Paris” was a terrific gift to those who’ve been there, and a testament to Woody’s still marvelous imagination and creativity.

  • Sy Weiss

    WOODY is one of the VERY Best Jews from My ERA.
    His Shtick was NYC at it’s greatest.
    See you thanks to PBS & 13.

  • SATHAJANAN LUXMAN

    OH WOODY! ITS VERY DIFFICULT TO PIC BEST WOODY ALLEN FILM,AS A FILM MAKER I WAS OBSESSED TO LEARN ABOUT WOODY,START LISTENING HIS EARLY STAND UPS.
    TWO GREAT DIRECTORS LIKE JAZZ , HIM AND EASTWOOD.THAT SAYS IT ALL.
    I LISTEN ALL THE TIME SOUNDTRACK OF THE MANHATTAN, STILL GOT THE VINYL LP.
    ITS A SIMPLE, THAT POSTER.BRIDGE,THE CHAIR.
    DANNY ROSE,WAS GREAT, RADIO DAYS WAS ICONIC,ANNIE HALL THE OSCAR,STARDUST MEMORIES WAS MEMORABLE,EVEN GOT AN OSCAR FOR MICHEAL CAINE IN HANNAH.
    WOODY’S BEST YEARS WERE 70 TO 80′S UP TO ALICE.
    WE KNOW EVERYTIME WHEN WOODY;S FILM IS COMING, THEN HE STARTED TO MAKE MORE , VERY RAPID AND FAST COULD NOT KEEP UP WITH WOODY.
    HE IS THE MODERN SAMUEL FULLER OF BLACK COMEDY, REASON SAMUEL FULLER ALWAYS GOT MONEY TO MAKE FILM IN HOLLYWOOD WITHOUT QUESTIONS ASKED.
    MY HOBBY IS MASTURBATION—-ANNIHALL.
    WELL, HE MADE ME LOVE MOVIES AND LIVE DYING FOR IT.
    I AM GOING TO GO FOR NEWYORK STORIES, BECAUSE HE IS WITH ANOTHER TWO GREAT DIRECTORS ALONG SIDE.
    GOOD NIGHT.

  • Phil Fier

    Woody Allen’s casting director came to the school I was teaching at and selected twin boys as extras for a garden scene in “Broadway Danny Rose.” When the film opened I rushed to see it with the hope he my students did not wind up on the cutting room floor. They didn’t, but I was shocked to see the two overweight boys stuffing their faces with food. A grotesque camera angle made them look huge. Woody ran through the crowd and their on camera time was seconds, but people seemed to remember it. The boys did not show up in school for days.