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  • Feb 24 10:00 pm
    America Reframed
    Agents of Change
    Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.
  • Feb 25 2:00 am
    America Reframed
    Agents of Change
    Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.
  • Feb 25 9:00 am
    America Reframed
    Agents of Change
    Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.
  • Feb 25 5:00 pm
    America Reframed
    Agents of Change
    Agents of Change looks at a pivotal moment when our nation was caught at the intersection of the Civil Rights, Black Power, and Anti-Vietnam War Movements. The film examines the racial conditions on college campuses across the U.S., focusing on two seminal protests: San Francisco State in 1968 and Cornell University in 1969. At San Francisco State, students and their supporters which included faculty and the increasingly influential Black Panther Party, launched the longest student strike in U.S. history. In addition to demanding curricular changes, the students, who yearned to learn about themselves and their history, demanded increased minority student recruitment and retention, and the hiring of minority faculty. Student activists demonstrated and faced brutal police assaults and massive arrests unleashed by then-Governor Ronald Reagan. Struggling for themselves and the generations of students to come, Black, Latino and Asian student groups worked together to form the Third World Liberation Front. Their efforts birthed the first College of Ethnic Studies in the nation and ignited similar actions across the country. Told through the voices of past student activists and organizers, Agents of Change unfolds with rich archival footage, compelling interviews, and a dynamic soundtrack. Today, nearly half a century later, many of the same demands are surfacing in campus protests across the country, revealing the present intersections Americans find themselves.
  • Feb 27 8:00 pm
    America Reframed
    Baddddd Sonia Sanchez
    For 80-year-old Sonia Sanchez, writing is both a personal and political act. She emerged as a seminal figure in the 1960s Black Arts Movement, raising her voice in the name of black culture, civil rights, women's liberation, and peace as a poet, playwright, teacher, activist and early champion of the spoken word. She is among the earliest poets to have incorporated urban black English into her poetry; she was one of the first activists to secure the inclusion of African American studies in university curricula. Deemed "a lion in literature's forest" by poet Maya Angelou and winner of major literary awards including the American Book Award, Sonia Sanchez is best known for 17 books of poetry that explore a wide range of global and humanist themes, particularly the struggles and triumphs of women and people of color. In BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez, Sanchez's life unfolds in a documentary rich with readings and jazz-accompanied performances of her work. With appearances by Questlove, Talib Kweli, Ursula Rucker, Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, Jessica Care Moore, Ruby Dee, Yasiin Bey, Ayana Mathis, Imani Uzuri and Bryonn Bain, the documentary examines Sanchez's contribution to the world of poetry, her singular place in the Black Arts Movement and her leadership role in African American culture over the last half century.
  • Feb 28 12:00 am
    America Reframed
    Baddddd Sonia Sanchez
    For 80-year-old Sonia Sanchez, writing is both a personal and political act. She emerged as a seminal figure in the 1960s Black Arts Movement, raising her voice in the name of black culture, civil rights, women's liberation, and peace as a poet, playwright, teacher, activist and early champion of the spoken word. She is among the earliest poets to have incorporated urban black English into her poetry; she was one of the first activists to secure the inclusion of African American studies in university curricula. Deemed "a lion in literature's forest" by poet Maya Angelou and winner of major literary awards including the American Book Award, Sonia Sanchez is best known for 17 books of poetry that explore a wide range of global and humanist themes, particularly the struggles and triumphs of women and people of color. In BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez, Sanchez's life unfolds in a documentary rich with readings and jazz-accompanied performances of her work. With appearances by Questlove, Talib Kweli, Ursula Rucker, Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, Jessica Care Moore, Ruby Dee, Yasiin Bey, Ayana Mathis, Imani Uzuri and Bryonn Bain, the documentary examines Sanchez's contribution to the world of poetry, her singular place in the Black Arts Movement and her leadership role in African American culture over the last half century.
  • Feb 28 8:00 am
    America Reframed
    Baddddd Sonia Sanchez
    For 80-year-old Sonia Sanchez, writing is both a personal and political act. She emerged as a seminal figure in the 1960s Black Arts Movement, raising her voice in the name of black culture, civil rights, women's liberation, and peace as a poet, playwright, teacher, activist and early champion of the spoken word. She is among the earliest poets to have incorporated urban black English into her poetry; she was one of the first activists to secure the inclusion of African American studies in university curricula. Deemed "a lion in literature's forest" by poet Maya Angelou and winner of major literary awards including the American Book Award, Sonia Sanchez is best known for 17 books of poetry that explore a wide range of global and humanist themes, particularly the struggles and triumphs of women and people of color. In BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez, Sanchez's life unfolds in a documentary rich with readings and jazz-accompanied performances of her work. With appearances by Questlove, Talib Kweli, Ursula Rucker, Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, Jessica Care Moore, Ruby Dee, Yasiin Bey, Ayana Mathis, Imani Uzuri and Bryonn Bain, the documentary examines Sanchez's contribution to the world of poetry, her singular place in the Black Arts Movement and her leadership role in African American culture over the last half century.
  • Feb 28 2:00 pm
    America Reframed
    Baddddd Sonia Sanchez
    For 80-year-old Sonia Sanchez, writing is both a personal and political act. She emerged as a seminal figure in the 1960s Black Arts Movement, raising her voice in the name of black culture, civil rights, women's liberation, and peace as a poet, playwright, teacher, activist and early champion of the spoken word. She is among the earliest poets to have incorporated urban black English into her poetry; she was one of the first activists to secure the inclusion of African American studies in university curricula. Deemed "a lion in literature's forest" by poet Maya Angelou and winner of major literary awards including the American Book Award, Sonia Sanchez is best known for 17 books of poetry that explore a wide range of global and humanist themes, particularly the struggles and triumphs of women and people of color. In BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez, Sanchez's life unfolds in a documentary rich with readings and jazz-accompanied performances of her work. With appearances by Questlove, Talib Kweli, Ursula Rucker, Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, Jessica Care Moore, Ruby Dee, Yasiin Bey, Ayana Mathis, Imani Uzuri and Bryonn Bain, the documentary examines Sanchez's contribution to the world of poetry, her singular place in the Black Arts Movement and her leadership role in African American culture over the last half century.
  • Mar 3 10:00 pm
    America Reframed
    Baddddd Sonia Sanchez
    For 80-year-old Sonia Sanchez, writing is both a personal and political act. She emerged as a seminal figure in the 1960s Black Arts Movement, raising her voice in the name of black culture, civil rights, women's liberation, and peace as a poet, playwright, teacher, activist and early champion of the spoken word. She is among the earliest poets to have incorporated urban black English into her poetry; she was one of the first activists to secure the inclusion of African American studies in university curricula. Deemed "a lion in literature's forest" by poet Maya Angelou and winner of major literary awards including the American Book Award, Sonia Sanchez is best known for 17 books of poetry that explore a wide range of global and humanist themes, particularly the struggles and triumphs of women and people of color. In BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez, Sanchez's life unfolds in a documentary rich with readings and jazz-accompanied performances of her work. With appearances by Questlove, Talib Kweli, Ursula Rucker, Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, Jessica Care Moore, Ruby Dee, Yasiin Bey, Ayana Mathis, Imani Uzuri and Bryonn Bain, the documentary examines Sanchez's contribution to the world of poetry, her singular place in the Black Arts Movement and her leadership role in African American culture over the last half century.
  • Mar 4 2:00 am
    America Reframed
    Baddddd Sonia Sanchez
    For 80-year-old Sonia Sanchez, writing is both a personal and political act. She emerged as a seminal figure in the 1960s Black Arts Movement, raising her voice in the name of black culture, civil rights, women's liberation, and peace as a poet, playwright, teacher, activist and early champion of the spoken word. She is among the earliest poets to have incorporated urban black English into her poetry; she was one of the first activists to secure the inclusion of African American studies in university curricula. Deemed "a lion in literature's forest" by poet Maya Angelou and winner of major literary awards including the American Book Award, Sonia Sanchez is best known for 17 books of poetry that explore a wide range of global and humanist themes, particularly the struggles and triumphs of women and people of color. In BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez, Sanchez's life unfolds in a documentary rich with readings and jazz-accompanied performances of her work. With appearances by Questlove, Talib Kweli, Ursula Rucker, Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, Jessica Care Moore, Ruby Dee, Yasiin Bey, Ayana Mathis, Imani Uzuri and Bryonn Bain, the documentary examines Sanchez's contribution to the world of poetry, her singular place in the Black Arts Movement and her leadership role in African American culture over the last half century.
  • Mar 4 9:00 am
    America Reframed
    Baddddd Sonia Sanchez
    For 80-year-old Sonia Sanchez, writing is both a personal and political act. She emerged as a seminal figure in the 1960s Black Arts Movement, raising her voice in the name of black culture, civil rights, women's liberation, and peace as a poet, playwright, teacher, activist and early champion of the spoken word. She is among the earliest poets to have incorporated urban black English into her poetry; she was one of the first activists to secure the inclusion of African American studies in university curricula. Deemed "a lion in literature's forest" by poet Maya Angelou and winner of major literary awards including the American Book Award, Sonia Sanchez is best known for 17 books of poetry that explore a wide range of global and humanist themes, particularly the struggles and triumphs of women and people of color. In BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez, Sanchez's life unfolds in a documentary rich with readings and jazz-accompanied performances of her work. With appearances by Questlove, Talib Kweli, Ursula Rucker, Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, Jessica Care Moore, Ruby Dee, Yasiin Bey, Ayana Mathis, Imani Uzuri and Bryonn Bain, the documentary examines Sanchez's contribution to the world of poetry, her singular place in the Black Arts Movement and her leadership role in African American culture over the last half century.
  • Mar 4 5:00 pm
    America Reframed
    Baddddd Sonia Sanchez
    For 80-year-old Sonia Sanchez, writing is both a personal and political act. She emerged as a seminal figure in the 1960s Black Arts Movement, raising her voice in the name of black culture, civil rights, women's liberation, and peace as a poet, playwright, teacher, activist and early champion of the spoken word. She is among the earliest poets to have incorporated urban black English into her poetry; she was one of the first activists to secure the inclusion of African American studies in university curricula. Deemed "a lion in literature's forest" by poet Maya Angelou and winner of major literary awards including the American Book Award, Sonia Sanchez is best known for 17 books of poetry that explore a wide range of global and humanist themes, particularly the struggles and triumphs of women and people of color. In BaddDDD Sonia Sanchez, Sanchez's life unfolds in a documentary rich with readings and jazz-accompanied performances of her work. With appearances by Questlove, Talib Kweli, Ursula Rucker, Amiri Baraka, Haki Madhubuti, Jessica Care Moore, Ruby Dee, Yasiin Bey, Ayana Mathis, Imani Uzuri and Bryonn Bain, the documentary examines Sanchez's contribution to the world of poetry, her singular place in the Black Arts Movement and her leadership role in African American culture over the last half century.
  • Mar 6 8:00 pm
    America Reframed
    A New Color: The Art of Being Edythe Boone
    Long before Black Lives Matter became a rallying cry, Edythe Boone embodied that truth as an activist, an educator, a great-grandmother, and foremost an artist. When a deeply personal tragedy ignites a national outcry, everything that Edy has worked so tirelessly for comes into question. From humble Harlem beginnings herself, the indefatigable "Edy" has for decades introduced underserved youth and seniors to the transformative power of art. Having helped her students use mural making to grapple with the disproportional shootings of young black men, the issue hits home when her nephew Eric Garner dies in police custody, his last words: "I can't breathe." The tragedy evokes the powerful and deep questions that many artists and activists face: has her nearly eight decades of social justice work meant something? Has it been worth the sacrifice? Can building multicultural bridges through art bring about positive change? Edy's reaction shows the depth of her clear-eyed, compassionate commitment to building a just and peaceful community. A New Color illuminates the social issues of our time and shows how the work of one woman reverberates throughout a community to inspire a powerful chorus: "Our lives matter and we will not be disempowered by those who judge us for our age, gender, or the color of their skin."
  • Mar 7 12:00 am
    America Reframed
    A New Color: The Art of Being Edythe Boone
    Long before Black Lives Matter became a rallying cry, Edythe Boone embodied that truth as an activist, an educator, a great-grandmother, and foremost an artist. When a deeply personal tragedy ignites a national outcry, everything that Edy has worked so tirelessly for comes into question. From humble Harlem beginnings herself, the indefatigable "Edy" has for decades introduced underserved youth and seniors to the transformative power of art. Having helped her students use mural making to grapple with the disproportional shootings of young black men, the issue hits home when her nephew Eric Garner dies in police custody, his last words: "I can't breathe." The tragedy evokes the powerful and deep questions that many artists and activists face: has her nearly eight decades of social justice work meant something? Has it been worth the sacrifice? Can building multicultural bridges through art bring about positive change? Edy's reaction shows the depth of her clear-eyed, compassionate commitment to building a just and peaceful community. A New Color illuminates the social issues of our time and shows how the work of one woman reverberates throughout a community to inspire a powerful chorus: "Our lives matter and we will not be disempowered by those who judge us for our age, gender, or the color of their skin."
  • Mar 7 8:00 am
    America Reframed
    A New Color: The Art of Being Edythe Boone
    Long before Black Lives Matter became a rallying cry, Edythe Boone embodied that truth as an activist, an educator, a great-grandmother, and foremost an artist. When a deeply personal tragedy ignites a national outcry, everything that Edy has worked so tirelessly for comes into question. From humble Harlem beginnings herself, the indefatigable "Edy" has for decades introduced underserved youth and seniors to the transformative power of art. Having helped her students use mural making to grapple with the disproportional shootings of young black men, the issue hits home when her nephew Eric Garner dies in police custody, his last words: "I can't breathe." The tragedy evokes the powerful and deep questions that many artists and activists face: has her nearly eight decades of social justice work meant something? Has it been worth the sacrifice? Can building multicultural bridges through art bring about positive change? Edy's reaction shows the depth of her clear-eyed, compassionate commitment to building a just and peaceful community. A New Color illuminates the social issues of our time and shows how the work of one woman reverberates throughout a community to inspire a powerful chorus: "Our lives matter and we will not be disempowered by those who judge us for our age, gender, or the color of their skin."
  • Mar 7 2:00 pm
    America Reframed
    A New Color: The Art of Being Edythe Boone
    Long before Black Lives Matter became a rallying cry, Edythe Boone embodied that truth as an activist, an educator, a great-grandmother, and foremost an artist. When a deeply personal tragedy ignites a national outcry, everything that Edy has worked so tirelessly for comes into question. From humble Harlem beginnings herself, the indefatigable "Edy" has for decades introduced underserved youth and seniors to the transformative power of art. Having helped her students use mural making to grapple with the disproportional shootings of young black men, the issue hits home when her nephew Eric Garner dies in police custody, his last words: "I can't breathe." The tragedy evokes the powerful and deep questions that many artists and activists face: has her nearly eight decades of social justice work meant something? Has it been worth the sacrifice? Can building multicultural bridges through art bring about positive change? Edy's reaction shows the depth of her clear-eyed, compassionate commitment to building a just and peaceful community. A New Color illuminates the social issues of our time and shows how the work of one woman reverberates throughout a community to inspire a powerful chorus: "Our lives matter and we will not be disempowered by those who judge us for our age, gender, or the color of their skin."
  • Mar 10 10:00 pm
    America Reframed
    A New Color: The Art of Being Edythe Boone
    Long before Black Lives Matter became a rallying cry, Edythe Boone embodied that truth as an activist, an educator, a great-grandmother, and foremost an artist. When a deeply personal tragedy ignites a national outcry, everything that Edy has worked so tirelessly for comes into question. From humble Harlem beginnings herself, the indefatigable "Edy" has for decades introduced underserved youth and seniors to the transformative power of art. Having helped her students use mural making to grapple with the disproportional shootings of young black men, the issue hits home when her nephew Eric Garner dies in police custody, his last words: "I can't breathe." The tragedy evokes the powerful and deep questions that many artists and activists face: has her nearly eight decades of social justice work meant something? Has it been worth the sacrifice? Can building multicultural bridges through art bring about positive change? Edy's reaction shows the depth of her clear-eyed, compassionate commitment to building a just and peaceful community. A New Color illuminates the social issues of our time and shows how the work of one woman reverberates throughout a community to inspire a powerful chorus: "Our lives matter and we will not be disempowered by those who judge us for our age, gender, or the color of their skin."
  • Mar 11 2:00 am
    America Reframed
    A New Color: The Art of Being Edythe Boone
    Long before Black Lives Matter became a rallying cry, Edythe Boone embodied that truth as an activist, an educator, a great-grandmother, and foremost an artist. When a deeply personal tragedy ignites a national outcry, everything that Edy has worked so tirelessly for comes into question. From humble Harlem beginnings herself, the indefatigable "Edy" has for decades introduced underserved youth and seniors to the transformative power of art. Having helped her students use mural making to grapple with the disproportional shootings of young black men, the issue hits home when her nephew Eric Garner dies in police custody, his last words: "I can't breathe." The tragedy evokes the powerful and deep questions that many artists and activists face: has her nearly eight decades of social justice work meant something? Has it been worth the sacrifice? Can building multicultural bridges through art bring about positive change? Edy's reaction shows the depth of her clear-eyed, compassionate commitment to building a just and peaceful community. A New Color illuminates the social issues of our time and shows how the work of one woman reverberates throughout a community to inspire a powerful chorus: "Our lives matter and we will not be disempowered by those who judge us for our age, gender, or the color of their skin."
  • Mar 11 9:00 am
    America Reframed
    A New Color: The Art of Being Edythe Boone
    Long before Black Lives Matter became a rallying cry, Edythe Boone embodied that truth as an activist, an educator, a great-grandmother, and foremost an artist. When a deeply personal tragedy ignites a national outcry, everything that Edy has worked so tirelessly for comes into question. From humble Harlem beginnings herself, the indefatigable "Edy" has for decades introduced underserved youth and seniors to the transformative power of art. Having helped her students use mural making to grapple with the disproportional shootings of young black men, the issue hits home when her nephew Eric Garner dies in police custody, his last words: "I can't breathe." The tragedy evokes the powerful and deep questions that many artists and activists face: has her nearly eight decades of social justice work meant something? Has it been worth the sacrifice? Can building multicultural bridges through art bring about positive change? Edy's reaction shows the depth of her clear-eyed, compassionate commitment to building a just and peaceful community. A New Color illuminates the social issues of our time and shows how the work of one woman reverberates throughout a community to inspire a powerful chorus: "Our lives matter and we will not be disempowered by those who judge us for our age, gender, or the color of their skin."
  • Mar 13 8:00 pm
    America Reframed
    100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice
    Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.
  • Mar 14 12:00 am
    America Reframed
    100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice
    Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.
  • Mar 14 8:00 am
    America Reframed
    100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice
    Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.
  • Mar 14 2:00 pm
    America Reframed
    100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice
    Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.
  • Mar 17 10:00 pm
    America Reframed
    100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice
    Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.
  • Mar 18 2:00 am
    America Reframed
    100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice
    Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.
  • Mar 18 9:00 am
    America Reframed
    100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice
    Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.
  • Mar 18 5:00 pm
    America Reframed
    100 Years: One Woman's Fight for Justice
    Elouise Cobell is a little known hero whose relentless pursuit of justice led her to find remedy for over half a million American Indian account holders whose funds were held by the U.S. government in trust for a century. An advocate for Native American financial self-determination and independence, she initiated new ways of viewing tribal trust funds and their management. In 1996, she led a lawsuit against the U.S. government for failing to pass on to individual American Indian landowners monies they had earned under oil, timber and mineral leases. "100 YEARS" is the compelling story of Elouise Cobell, a petite Blackfeet warrior from Montana, the great granddaughter of the legendary, Mountain Chief, and how she prevailed.
  • Mar 20 8:00 pm
    America Reframed
    The Invisible Patients
    Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.
  • Mar 21 12:00 am
    America Reframed
    The Invisible Patients
    Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.
  • Mar 21 8:00 am
    America Reframed
    The Invisible Patients
    Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.
  • Mar 21 2:00 pm
    America Reframed
    The Invisible Patients
    Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.
  • Mar 24 10:00 pm
    America Reframed
    The Invisible Patients
    Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.
  • Mar 25 2:00 am
    America Reframed
    The Invisible Patients
    Through the story of Jessica Macleod, Ph.D., a dedicated nurse practitioner in Evansville, Indiana, and her four homebound and marginalized patients, THE INVISIBLE PATIENTS sheds light on some of the most urgent healthcare issues facing our nation today: from the living conditions of the elderly poor and end-of-life care, to the soaring costs of hospitalization, complexity of insurance and overprescription of opiates. It challenges us to wrestle with not just healthcare policy, but as importantly, asks how to care for all persons with dignity and respect.
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