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  • December 14, 2009

    Best Movies by Farr: (Early) Worthy Wyler

    by John Farr

    John Farr recommends three films from legend William Wyler’s early oeuvre.


    Counsellor at Law (1933)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Perched high atop New York in his law office, attorney George Simon (John Barrymore) runs a busy, lucrative practice handling or rather, manhandling – a dizzying array of high-profile cases. GS, as he is known to his staff, may run with (and occasionally bilk) the rich and powerful, but he also remembers his roots as an immigrant toiling on the streets of Greenwich Village, something his status-conscious socialite wife, Cora (Doris Kenyon), seems almost ashamed of. When George is faced with disbarment for an incident of misconduct in his past, his high and mighty world is turned upside-down.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    William Wyler’s engrossing, head-spinning drama features Barrymore in a knockout role as a hotshot attorney with a formidable track record, a notable penchant for hard-luck cases, and a fawning softness for his well-to-do wife, whose affection does not seem nearly so unconditional. As a series of mini dramas play out around Simon- involving agonized clients from the old neighborhood, interactions among his chirpy young staff, and the unspoken, unrequited love of faithful secretary Regina (Daniels), “Counsellor” inexorably builds to a tense climax. Filled with vivid performances by a slew of fine character actors, “Counsellor” is a rapid-fire drama of class and privilege, love and lucre.


    Dodsworth (1936)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Sam Dodsworth (Walter Huston), a business tycoon, decides to retire and take an extended trip to Europe with wife Fran (Ruth Chatterton). Unfortunately, Sam’s financial success has only increased Fran’s latent vanity and social-climbing tendencies. No longer distracted by his work, Sam sees his wife’s weaknesses for the first time, as she openly flirts and cavorts with a European aristocrat. Sam must confront the problem in his marriage, then find a way to regain some happiness for himself.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Director William Wyler and screenwriter Sydney Howard have crafted an adult, perceptive romantic drama, beautifully played. They wisely minimize the soapiness inherent in the premise, leaving an honest and surprisingly moving film about love lost and re-discovered. The Oscar-nominated Huston is superb.


    Jezebel (1938)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Julie Marsden (Bette Davis) is a willful New Orleans belle engaged to banker Preston Dillard (Henry Fonda) in the antebellum South. Julie is also needy and manipulative, which soon drives Pres away. He later returns with a wife, which foils Julie’s plans for a reconciliation. After finding new ways to cause mischief among the menfolk, Julie seizes one final chance to redeem herself.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    “Jezebel” was Davis’s consolation prize for not landing the part of Scarlett O’Hara. Inevitably compared to “Gone With the Wind” (released one year later), this lavish melodrama stands on its own, thanks to Wyler’s expert direction and his camera’s loving attention to Warners’ biggest female star. Davis, who nabbed her second best actress Oscar for this, is superb and looks glorious, while Fonda is suitably restrained as Pres. Don’t miss the famous scene at the ball.


    Visit Best Movies by Farr for more great DVD recommendations.

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  • December 14, 2009

    Best Movies by Farr: Twenty-Something Romantic Angst

    by John Farr

    If you enjoyed Mutual Appreciation, you might also enjoy these great films about twenty-something romance:


    Before Sunrise (1995)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Making his way to Vienna to catch a cheap flight home, 20-something American tourist Jesse (Ethan Hawke) chats up Celine (Julie Delpy), a student at the Sorbonne, on a Eurail train and finds they have a lot in common. When they arrive at his station, Jesse proposes that Celine disembark with him in Vienna and keep him company until his plane leaves the next morning. Impetuously, she agrees, and together they embark on a brief but unforgettable adventure.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    This intelligent and unconventional tale of talky romance borrows something from the work of French auteur Eric Rohmer, but “Dazed and Confused” director Linklater – a master of meandering conversation – puts his own stamp on the character-driven drama with searching, tone-perfect dialogue. As the two wander the streets discussing love and sex, history and politics, Hawke and Delpy make attractive kindred spirits whose youthful, sometimes argumentative exchanges really seem to echo life. Despite the R rating, “Sunrise” is an ideal film for teens, as it captures a sense of life’s wondrous possibilities.


    High Fidelity (2000)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Chicago record-shop owner Rob (John Cusack) finds himself examining the sorry state of his obsessive, audiophile lifestyle when his lawyer girlfriend, Laura (Iben Hjejle), decides she needs more from Rob than the scruffy, thirty-something vinyl fetishist is willing to give. Dejected, Rob starts looking up ex-girlfriends and inquiring about his serial faults, while Laura hooks up with his supersensitive, dunder-head neighbor, Ian (Tim Robbins). Can Rob win her back?

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Frears’s surprisingly insightful film, adapted from the Nick Hornby novel, examines the comic romantic entanglements of a lovable music-store geek. His record stacks and Top Five lists may be in perfect order, but his love life is a shambles, and Cusack plays the part with shaggy-dog affection. Aside from solid direction and a great soundtrack, the other selling point here is the supporting cast, in particular Jack Black as a crass, super-snobby record nerd and Robbins as a New Age devotee. High Fidelity hits a steady, heartfelt groove that will keep you in stitches.


    Regular Lovers (2005)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    In the heady days of May 68 in Paris, 20-year-old poet Francois (Louis Garrel) flees the riot cops on the Night of the Barricades and holes up at the flat of opium-smoking bohemian Antoine (Julien Lucas), who houses young artists, druggies, and hangers-on. There, Francois meets free-spirited sculptor Lilie (Hesme), and falls deeply in love. But as the nature of the revolution changes, so does their idealistic and blissful romance.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    This hypnotic, visually ravishing homage to the spirit of ’68 is an autobiographical tour de force by critically acclaimed French filmmaker Philippe Garrel, who cast his own son as Francois, modeled after his youthful self. Instead of memorializing or sentimentalizing the time, Garrel re-creates the mood of rebellion and youthful vigor in the first half, then allows the story-like the radical political movement itself-to drift into dissolution and disappointment. Garrel’s son Louis is superb as the cerebral, easygoing Francois, and Hesme refreshingly pure as the object of his love and esteem. Beautifully lensed in rich black and white, “Lovers” is a uniquely personal film, a love poem to a utopian moment destined to pass.


    Visit Best Movies by Farr for more great DVD recommendations.

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  • December 10, 2009

    Panel Discussion: Low Cost/No Cost Filmmaking

    Christopher Allen, founder and director of UnionDocs, independent producer and new head of programming at UnionDocs, Steve Holmgren, our very own Reel 13 producers Rich Siegmeister and Bob Morris, and Keith Boynton and Mike Lavoie of 12films12weeks met at DCTV for a New York Film/Video Council discussion about low-cost filmmaking, exploring how filmmakers with low budgets can produce valuable work.

    Freelance multimedia producer and documentary filmmaker Pamela Cohn, the moderator of the discussion, wrote about the event on her blog, Still in Motion:

    As Wild West-ish as the independent film community can be about our methods of production, most New York-based media makers, particularly first-timers, will really only register a small amount of distribution and exhibition advice from the guru-of-the-moment, take it as gospel, and try a recipe that might be mildly successful for some, but is far from a panacea for how to find appropriate outlets for original content.  It’s not necessary to fork over hundreds of dollars so “an expert” can tell you how to DIY yourself through a mountain of work with, oftentimes, very little in return.  We need only look a bit further and broaden our horizons just a tad to find viable distribution and marketing partnerships that reside, literally, in our backyard.

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  • December 10, 2009

    A Scouting Life: A Surprise Request

    by Sam Hutchins

    I took my time getting to the office the next morning. Work had been a seven-day-a-week affair for the last couple months, so I figured I could ease up a little. Anyway, the project was clearly falling apart. Why continue beating myself up if I didn’t have to. Instead I savored the feeling of waking up in my own bed, in my city, home again at last.

    The office was indeed quiet. Many years in the business had conditioned me to be up and at it very early in the day. The Chinese contingent worked extremely hard, harder than most I have known. They started later in the day, however, usually appearing around ten in the morning while in New York. I had grown accustomed to having the office to myself for the first few hours. This first day back the office was still quiet as lunchtime crept up on me.

    There was certainly no lack of work to be done so I went right at it. I had thousands of photos to edit and file, notebooks to transcribe, etc. This was happening just before mobile GPS units came to be commonly used, so I had done it all the old fashioned way. Navigation had been by paper map and logs had been handwritten in a notebook, usually while driving 90 mph as Darius fiddled with the iPod and Stephane found some new way to bother me from the back seat. I had plenty of organizing to do.

    In time my friend Carol, the UPM who had brought me on to the project, arrived and asked to speak to me. She confirmed my suspicions that the project was indeed floundering. She also told me that she was leaving to start something else, a film that had its financing firmly in place. I expressed my regrets but knew it was for the best. She is extremely talented, and part of her job as a production manager is to be very practical about making the film. Every aspect of how we were making this movie was ass-backwards and she had never been fully comfortable with their process. She was pretty much convinced that these guys were all bullshit artists of the first magnitude and gladly left the project.

    I could see her point to an extent. Typically on a film you avoid spending money as long as possible while working out the details. The closer you are to having a locked script, budget and schedule the better off you are. We had nothing of the sort. Hell, we had no more than the vaguest idea as to the story we were telling. Nonetheless we had spent a six-figure sum travelling cross-country while Kar Wai wrapped his head around it all. We were not approaching this with any sort of logic or reason. Kar Wai makes movies much like John Coltrane performs his compositions. A thrilling journey to be sure, but not one everyone cares to take.

    The quiet lasted for several days. I was largely alone in the office, organizing the wreckage. I saw almost nothing of Kar Wai during this time. He was sequestered in his hotel, still writing by all accounts. Every so often he would appear in the office for a meeting with a potential financier. These meetings were all held behind closed doors and in great secrecy so I was in the dark. Darius was back in Paris visiting his family, and Stephane’s rare visits to the office were my only connection to the inner circle surrounding Kar Wai.

    I was packing to leave one evening when Stephane called me over to his desk.

    “Sam, Kar Wai wants a favor from you.”

    “Of course, what can I do?”

    “No one can know this, but he has a script he has written for this. He would like you to look it over and give your opinion. He mainly wants to know if the dialogue sounds right, but you should give any other notes you have on the story as well.”

    Interesting on so many levels. First of all, a script? What the hell? Kar Wai legendarily does not use scripts, so that was a shock. Also, it appears we are moving forward. I had been convinced the axe was going to fall any day and we were abandoning the project, so this was news as well. Most of all, though, I was beyond flattered to be asked for notes. My hero wanted my creative input? Very little could have happened that would make me happier. I sat down at my laptop to see what he had written with great anticipation.

    ….

    STAY TUNED FOR THE NEXT INSTALLMENT OF THE SCOUTING LIFE.

    Sam Hutchins has been working in film production for twenty years. He started as overnight security on the set of “Working Girl” while attending film school at NYU. Since 1995 he has been a location manager for some of the top names in the business. He’ll be blogging from a unique insider’s perspective on the filmmaking process, as well as speaking to his colleagues in the production community to share their experiences with you.

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  • December 8, 2009

    A Scouting Life: The Date from a Bad Movie

    by Sam Hutchins

    The three of us ducked across the street to grab a steak at Morton’s. The place was empty aside from our table. I couldn’t really get too involved in dinner as I was waiting for the waitress to call. Darius and Kar Wai seemed giddy with the prospects the evening presented. How perverse.

    “So where will you take her?”

    “Probably the Harbor Inn. We saw it earlier, over by the shipyard.”

    “Okay, how long til you get back? When should we go to your room?”

    “I don’t know, an hour?”

    “Good. Leave a key at the desk in my name, then make lots of noise when you bring her back so we have time to hide.”

    “Yeah, sure, OK.”

    They really meant to go through with this. Creepy. Thankfully it wasn’t long before she called and told me to meet her on a corner a few blocks away. I made my exit with promises to leave a room key at the front desk. Of course I did nothing of the sort. I went around the hotel instead of through it, heading directly to her car.

    As soon as I got in I realized what a dreadful mistake I had made. The car was piled with fast food wrappers, dirty clothes, empty beer bottles and all manner of garbage. She apologized and we gathered the detritus and shoved it into the back seat together. As we did I noticed the child seat in back. This was just getting better and better.

    “Sorry, hon, the heat doesn’t work too well. Bundle up.”

    Ugh. We drove down to the Harbor Inn but it was closed, locked up tighter than a drum. We could see a brightly lit faux-Irish bar down the block so we drove over to it. At this point I wanted nothing more than to go back to my bed. Alone. I shivered as she pulled up in front of the pub. What the hell, it can’t get any worse, why not? Leaning over I turned her face to me and went in for the kiss. She pushed me away.

    “I’m not that type of girl. We just met. Let’s have a beer and get to know each other. But you should know that we’re definitely not screwing around tonight.”

    And I had thought it couldn’t get any worse. We sat through a couple pints as she prattled on endlessly about her ex-husband who was in and out of jail as she struggled to raise her son. Apparently his greatest act as a father had been to buy the little tyke a motorcycle jacket. If the sometime convict had walked in on us drinking and shot me dead in a jealous rage it would have been a mercy killing. She wasn’t a bad person, just terribly uninteresting and overly self-involved. The disconnect between fantasy and reality can be jarring at times like this. Darius and Kar Wai were the lucky ones. They got to stay back in their warm hotel beds imagining the wild sexy hijinks I was up to. I instead sat in a cold, deserted bar listening to an unending monologue consisting of day care schedules, gripes about work as a cocktail waitress and longing for the convict father of her child. This really had nothing to do with making movies.

    Over breakfast the next morning Darius and Kar Wai pressed me for details. The more I insisted nothing had happened the bigger their grins grew.

    “Yes, a gentleman does not tell,” said Darius “But was she kinky?”

    They convinced themselves some wild evening had taken place and no amount of denial on my part was going to change that. At least it gave us a few laughs over breakfast. The distraction was welcome, as I was pretty sure the film was dead and we were just cleaning up the mess. Based on a favorable forecast we made our way back to New York City.

    Eight hours of driving in near silence. Kar Wai did as was his wont, gazing off at a point in the distance and disappearing in his own thoughts. Darius mainly slept. I was just getting accustomed to Kar Wai’s odd ways and wanted more time travelling with him. He would initiate conversations, ask you a detailed question, then something would catch his attention and he would just check out. It happened several times like that. Mid sentence you would realize he wasn’t hearing a word you were saying to him. An hour or a day later he would resume the conversation exactly where you left off, as though not a moment had passed. I wondered what was going on behind those glasses and wanted to find out.

    Returning home was an odd feeling; it seemed so abrupt. After all those wide-open spaces and infinite possibilities I was suddenly fighting traffic by Ground Zero and planning to wrap up the job. I dropped the guys off at their hotel with brusque goodbyes and drove to Hertz. I had to explain how a car we were supposed to return in Phoenix a month ago wound up in Greenwich Village with me at that moment. I still wasn’t quite sure myself.

    ….

    STAY TUNED FOR THE NEXT INSTALLMENT OF THE SCOUTING LIFE.

    Sam Hutchins has been working in film production for twenty years. He started as overnight security on the set of “Working Girl” while attending film school at NYU. Since 1995 he has been a location manager for some of the top names in the business. He’ll be blogging from a unique insider’s perspective on the filmmaking process, as well as speaking to his colleagues in the production community to share their experiences with you.

    • comments (0)
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