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  • January 11, 2010

    A Scouting Life: 3 iPods, 1 Soundtrack

    by Sam Hutchins

    When you are on the road with the same people for so long the petty grievances build up. It’s simply unavoidable. I previously mentioned the difficulties we had agreeing on what music to listen to, and this remained a bone of contention. Darius, Stephane and I each had our own iPod full of music. I’d be willing to bet that of the tens of thousands of songs amongst them there wasn’t a single one that appeared on all three. Our tastes in music were incredibly divergent.

    Stephane’s was surprisingly parochial. He liked European club music. Not house, techno or anything awful like that, thank God. More like acid jazz/triphop type of stuff. Not bad, really, I’ll admit I even enjoyed a bit of it. However it was the only genre of music he seemed to have. From speaking to him I knew he liked the Ramones, but there was nary a trace of them on his iPod. His selection seemed to be a slave to fashion, as the stuff he listened to was very much au courant. When he happened upon a southeast asian bhanjee/techno mix on my hard drive he commented that it had been all the rage two summers earlier. I’d bet anything that four years prior his iPod would have been almost exclusively the Gypsy Kings, and that I would have murdered him before going a hundred miles. Enjoyable as the current stuff was, it’s really only appropriate after dark. I don’t need to hear a sax playing over a DJ as we drive through the Midwest at ten in the morning in a cold winter light.

    Darius’ taste was all over the map. I have eclectic tastes but his was almost completely random. It took forever to figure out a defining theme of any sort but finally I put it together. Darius chose his library song-by-song. If he liked it, he had it. What he liked, however, was pretty specific. It had to be obscure as hell. Whatever song it was had to be something he could talk about as the very best song the particular artist had ever recorded and tell you why you could never find the song. For instance he had a version of Lee Marvin singing the western classic “Wandering Star”. I happen to love the song and have versions of it recorded by everyone from Bing Crosby to Shane MacGowan. I’d heard the Lee Marvin version in the film but never since, yet there it was on Darius iPod. And it was the only country song he had. Listening to music with him was like having an oenophile order you wine by the glass.

    For my own part, my taste was immersive in a wide variety of genres. A very wide variety. Having been a punk early on, for instance, I had everything worth owning by The Clash, Ramones, Dead Kennedy’s, Black Flag, Agnostic Front, GBH, 7 Seconds, Cro-Mags, JFA, The Exploited, etc. I had similarly deep rosters of artists in genres of all types, including but not limited to Reggae (traditional, dancehall and dub), Country (cowboy, outlaw, alt-country), etc. My tendency would be to tailor our soundtrack to wherever we were travelling at the moment but my plans were continually thwarted by my companions. I’d be floating through west Texas on the wings of Chris LeDoux when Stephane would without warning switch to some Portishead.

    So thank God for Kar Wai. Once he started travelling with us he took over the music selection. He got a particular kick out of sorting through our respective iPods and playing fairly random songs. He would then usually ask us something about the song. Where we first heard it, what it meant to us, etc. This was a very interesting way of getting better acquainted with us, and I must admit I lifted the technique from him for use in my personal life since. The downside of this was that Kar Wai is prone to drift off into his own mental space. Every time we played this little game he would eventually fade out. A song would end, silence would ensue, and he would be staring off at some point in the middle distance again.

    He had drifted away like that once more as we began approaching Memphis. The first few times it happened I had tried to break through with no success. Speaking loudly, grabbing his arm, pulling the car over, nothing seemed to bring him back to us. It was, frankly, a little scary. This time, however, I was more concerned with the music. I’m a serious Johnny Cash fan, to the point that I actually believe he was a holy man or prophet of sorts. Memphis means Elvis to many, Al Green to others, even Stax Records to a few. For me it’s all about Johnny, and I’ll be damned if I was driving into town without hearing his voice. While still driving I reached across and gently took my iPod from his hand. Spinning the dial I pulled up the Bear Records 1954-58 collection and turned up the volume. Kar Wai didn’t flinch and no complaint came from the back seat. We pulled into Memphis accompanied by the Man in Black, as it should be.

    ….

    STAY TUNED FOR THE NEXT INSTALLMENT OF THE SCOUTING LIFE.

    Sam Hutchins has been working in film production for twenty years. He started as overnight security on the set of “Working Girl” while attending film school at NYU. Since 1995 he has been a location manager for some of the top names in the business. He’ll be blogging from a unique insider’s perspective on the filmmaking process, as well as speaking to his colleagues in the production community to share their experiences with you.

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  • January 7, 2010

    A Scouting Life: Missed Opportunities in St. Louis

    by Sam Hutchins

    We wound up making a few more fruitless stops on the way, so it was late when we hit St. Louis.  Once again Stephane took the wheel late and got us home.  As it was an unexpected stop in a town I’d never been in our office booked the hotel.  Much to my amusement it was one of those awful round towers built in the late 60’s-early 70’s, similar to the Capitol records building in Hollywood.

    St. Louis

    St. Louis

    Once you are in production on a job you receive per diem when on location.  Per diem is great.  It is a daily allotment of cash you are given to cover expenses, tax free up to a certain amount.  You can generally live pretty well on it and still pocket part of it.  You’re supposed to be paid it whenever you are on location, but companies generally screw you out of it as long as possible, telling you to submit receipts instead.  As this was the case on this job, and I went without per diem for the first several months, I did what I could to even up.   Stopping at the lobby bar on the way to the elevators, I ordered four glasses of Jameson and signed them and a generous tip to my room.

    I was pleasantly surprised to find that my room was on a high floor and overlooked Busch Stadium.  I’m a big baseball fan and would love to catch a game there sometime.  As it was late and we had been focused on finding the hotel I wasn’t at all aware of its proximity.  Being February at the time it was offseason.  Still, the stadium was all lit up and sat like a green gem just across the river.  Regrettably I didn’t think to take pictures until after I had a few in me.  Four glasses of whiskey with no tripod and low light equals a series of blurry photos.  Still it was a lovely sight to nod off to.

    We were up and out early the next morning.  Found the closest Starbucks for fuel and started exploring.  As per our custom I found the train station and bus station and we explored them.  We had no specific use for them yet but knowing our character was travelling throughout the film we scouted them wherever we wound up for possible use as transition shots.  Union Station was pretty great.
    Similar to the grand train terminals I’ve seen in Washington, New York and Philadelphia but on a smaller scale, and much more beat up and dingy.  In other words, good for Kar Wai.

    Both stations were on the south side, and as usual the bus station was in a particularly poor part of town.  If you need to find the ghetto in any city just look for the Greyhound Station.  Actually all of St. Louis was surprisingly poor, but it had great bones — lots of well-built old brick houses and apartments suffering neglect.  Coming from New York City where everything is ridiculously expensive I’m always shocked when I see buildings like that.  The idea that I could buy a great old townhouse in the center of a city for 25K or so and fix it up boggles the mind.  Of course, then you’d be in St. Louis.  No knock on the city; I just wouldn’t know what to do there.

    Falstaff Brewery

    Falstaff Brewery

    We came across an old Falstaff Brewery, which of course brought New Orleans to mind.  Why doesn’t someone buy that name and start brewing a new Falstaff?  What a great name for a beer.  Turning the corner I caught site of a charming looking candy store.  I tried to motivate the group in that direction but no one was interested.  Years later I saw Crown Candy featured on The Food Network as a place with amazing ice cream and regretted not making more of an effort.  Still, it was very cold and I love Memphis so I was glad to hear the guys were ready to get going.  Next stop, Tennessee.

    Crown Candy

    Crown Candy

    ….

    STAY TUNED FOR THE NEXT INSTALLMENT OF THE SCOUTING LIFE.

    Sam Hutchins has been working in film production for twenty years. He started as overnight security on the set of “Working Girl” while attending film school at NYU. Since 1995 he has been a location manager for some of the top names in the business. He’ll be blogging from a unique insider’s perspective on the filmmaking process, as well as speaking to his colleagues in the production community to share their experiences with you.

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  • January 5, 2010

    A Scouting Life: Back on the Road to Memphis

    by Sam Hutchins

    One of the earlier things Kar Wai had said to me was that in order to get someplace it’s best to go in the opposite direction. Turns out this was true not only for the story he was telling, but in the story of his life as well. In order to scout Memphis we flew to Chicago. I’m not sure if that was the easiest place to meet Darius, who was flying in from Paris, or if there was another reason. Kar Wai seemed very fond of Chinatown in Chicago, maybe that was part of the attraction? Whatever his reason, I had long ago stopped trying to figure him out. He moved like a force of nature and all I could do was try to keep up.

    Merely trying to keep up was a new way of doing the job for me. In my work you need to stay a step ahead of the director. For instance, once we were in the hotel I pored over my maps, reacquainting myself with the immediate area. I determined the best route from the hotel to the highway, and what was the best route to Memphis. Also, the best way to get to any of the locations we had liked on our last trip there. I was mentally rehearsing the various possibilities when we met in the morning, and as usual I was surprised.

    “Let’s go to Chinatown. There is a good place for breakfast there.”

    Very well, it was a trip to the Congee Palace for us. Of course while we were driving I got a call from Darius, who was in a cab at the airport. He insisted I give his driver, a Chicago cabbie, directions from the airport to Chinatown. Needless to say the cabbie knew the route better than I did but spending a few moments on the phone with him at least calmed Darius down. Both he and his four suitcases made it to the restaurant intact, and we all sat over bowls of Congee and caught up with each other.

    If you’ve never had congee, by the way, good for you. If you’ve seen The Matrix, there is a scene where the crew sits around the table eating bowls of wet slop that vaguely resembles mucus. That’s pretty much what congee is. Unlike in The Matrix, however, in real life it is spiced up with whatever manner of offal the chef feels like tossing in that morning. I was glad to be back out scouting with the guys but had not missed some of these meals. Breakfast finished, we hit the medicinal store for a fresh supply of herbs and teas before heading south. I lucked out and found the right highway without too much confusion and we were off.

    We often meandered on local roads, taking the scenic route. Asking around, there seemed to be no interest in seeing anything on the way to Memphis, so I took the highway. It was already late morning so it looked like it was going to be a long haul to make Memphis before the middle of the night. I bore down and drove fast, and was just starting to get back in the groove when Kar Wai snapped out of his usual reverie and pointed out the window.

    “Let’s go there.”

    As usual, I had to pull a pretty ugly move to get to where he wanted to be. Screeching across three lanes and off the exit ramp, I saw what he was interested in.

    “Kar Wai, I think that’s a prison.”

    “Oh. Can we go in?”

    “Sure, we just need to stick up a gas station.”

    Alas, it seems humor is the first thing that gets lost in translation. After an interminably long blank stare I clarified.

    “I doubt we can without having made prior arrangements.”

    “Oh. We should keep going then.”

    Of course I was already off the highway and outside the prison walls. We appeared to be somewhere in Joliet, Illinois. I started meandering around, trying to find our way back onto the highway, when something else caught his eye.

    “Let’s go there.”

    I couldn’t believe it. He had us stop in at a faux-old drive-in restaurant. One of those places meant to evoke the whole American Graffiti/Happy Days carhop experiences. However this place was done about as badly as you could imagine. Horrible posters of Elvis and Marilyn Monroe everywhere, it was possibly the least authentic location in America. Worse, the walls were all gleaming white and basically impossible to shoot decently. Looking around quickly I assumed he would come to his senses. No such luck.

    “Can we take pictures?”

    Sigh.

    “Let me ask.”

    Of course the place was packed, and I had to wait in line for a while before getting to a small window I had to yell through to be heard. The teenage countergirl looked absolutely perplexed at my spiel, and only after much talking, brandishing of business cards and even a little pantomime did she deign to go get the manager. The manager wanted to know exactly what date we wanted to film there and for how long before allowing us to take scouting photos. Exasperated by trying to explain it to her I eventually gave in and simply made up an imaginary date. I then waited for her to amble back to her office to check her calendar.

    “Sorry, hun, but June 14th is no good. That’s when we have a big rally of all the antique cars here. We’d be much too busy to let you have the place.”

    Unbelievable.

    “Okay, then, how about June 15th. That could work for us also.”

    Another slow amble back to her office. This time she had good news.

    “The 15th is good. So go ahead and take your pictures if you want. Maybe you could put some of the cars in your movie.”

    “Thank you very much, ma’am. We’ll consider it.”

    “No problem. But remember, you can’t be here on the 14th.”

    Considering that I had no intention of ever setting foot in the place again in my life, I assented. Easily twenty minutes had passed by the time I got back to the guys and gave them the okay to shoot the place. Darius looked up from the magazine he was reading, scratched his head and looked around.

    “I don’t think we should bother. This place won’t photograph well. The walls are all white.”

    Ugh. It turned out that getting on the highway again was complicated, so we drove down the old Route 66 for a while. We started passing a few old tourist traps, giant plastic statues and the like. They were real Americana, unlike the faux-50’s drive in we had just left. I kept waiting for Kar Wai to react to one of them, but nothing. The more time I spent with the man the less I understood him.

    ….

    STAY TUNED FOR THE NEXT INSTALLMENT OF THE SCOUTING LIFE.

    Sam Hutchins has been working in film production for twenty years. He started as overnight security on the set of “Working Girl” while attending film school at NYU. Since 1995 he has been a location manager for some of the top names in the business. He’ll be blogging from a unique insider’s perspective on the filmmaking process, as well as speaking to his colleagues in the production community to share their experiences with you.

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  • January 4, 2010

    Best Movies by Farr: War & Espionage Essentials

    by John Farr

    John Farr’s declassified dossier of essential war & espionage films.


    The Guns of Navarone (1961)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Crack Allied team commanded by Peck is recruited for a top-secret, near-suicide mission: penetrate a remote fortress on a Nazi-held island and blow up the two enormous long-range guns which prevent the rescue of two thousand British soldiers.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Epic-scale adventure based on Alistair MacLean’s book. The movie boasts terrific action sequences, but is also an engrossing ensemble drama thanks to a sterling screenplay from producer Carl Foreman and terrific turns from a top international cast, including Niven, Quinn, and Quayle.


    The Counterfeit Traitor (1962)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Collared for importing oil from the Nazi regime, Swedish petrol dealer Erik Erickson (William Holden) is told by British intelligence officer Collins (Hugh Griffith) that his name will be cleared-but only if he engages in a bit of espionage for the Allies. Erickson reluctantly agrees, and is soon branded a traitor for his bogus pro-Nazi business dealings. Secretly, however, Erickson has entered Germany not to build a refinery, but to locate sensitive military information.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Based on the true story of a blackmailed oil dealer born on American soil, Seaton’s riveting wartime thriller features a knockout performance by Holden, whose burly frame and husky voice is a perfect fit for the role. The radiant Lilli Palmer holds her own as Marianne Mollendorf, the Prussian socialite who assists in providing crucial target information to the Allied forces, as well as offering amorous comfort to Erickson, whose own wife has left him. For a finely crafted, nerve-jarring tale of real-world subterfuge, don’t let “The Counterfeit Traitor” out of sight.


    Where Eagles Dare (1968)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Crack Allied team during World War II is assigned to penetrate a remote Nazi alpine fortress to free a captured General. This intricate mission is headed by British Major Jonathan Smith (Richard Burton), supported by steely American Lieutenant Morris Schaffer (Clint Eastwood). Though the plan is inspired, there are factors unknown to the team which will alter the course of events, forcing some improvisation.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Master of adventure Alistair MacLean adapts his own novel to the screen with impressive results. The film is epic in scale and length, yet there are no lulls. Colorful and tense, “Eagles” will engage you straight through to its breathtaking conclusion. A huge box-office success, this helped solidify Eastwood’s position as a bankable star.


    Visit Best Movies by Farr for more great DVD recommendations.

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  • December 21, 2009

    Best Movies by Farr: Other Pictures in Paris

    by John Farr

    John Farr travels to Paris in search of fine films.


    Ninotchka (1939)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Greta Garbo’s first comedy, “Ninotchka” details what can happen-on a purely human, emotional level-when communism and capitalism collide. Three Russian comrades travel to Paris to sell an invaluable necklace with proceeds to benefit the party. The necklace’s rightful owner, Grand Duchess Swana (Ina Claire) prevails on Count Leon D’Algout (Melvyn Douglas) to restore the necklace to her. The Count blocks the sale and distracts the three Russians with all the capitalistic excesses Paris has to offer. When Moscow notes the delay, they send tough emissary Ninotchka (Greta Garbo) to move things along. When the cold but impossibly beautiful agent arrives in Paris and meets the Count, he realizes his mission has become much more challenging, but more interesting as well.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    “Garbo Laughs!” screamed the publicity, and so will you (laugh, not scream). Director Ernst Lubitsch infuses this gossamer “East meets West” romance with his trademark chic style and clever sophistication. Garbo’s transformation from icy harridan to warm, alluring female is a wonder to behold, and Douglas is understated and suitably wry as the Count, never stepping in Garbo’s light too much. With a peerless script by Billy Wilder and Charles Brackett, this is the movie equivalent to champagne, and, of course, caviar. (Trivia note: this picture was remade as a musical for Fred Astaire: 1957′s “Silk Stockings”.


    Last Tango in Paris (1972)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    While apartment-hunting in Paris, sultry 20-year-old Jeanne (Maria Schneider) meets Paul (Marlon Brando), a brooding middle-aged American whose wife has recently committed suicide for reasons he cannot fathom. Within minutes, they make love in the empty flat, a desolate place that becomes their temple of carnality, but with strict rules established by Paul.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Scandalous in 1972 and still unsettling today, Bernardo Bertolucci’s bizarre, fascinating psychodrama depicts sex not as a union of two human beings, but as a reflection of their alienation from each other. While the butter scene is justly famous, this isn’t the only reason “Tango” stays with you. Just watch Brando closely here: at certain moments you catch a glimpse of that fiery young man in the ripped tee-shirt, railing against the world’s injustices, down but never out, and utterly, brilliantly alive. (Trivia note: reportedly, to build a feeling of spontaneity, Brando would improvise his own lines the day before shooting a scene. In many instances, Paul’s memories of childhood are Brando’s.)


    Ronin (1998)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Sam (Robert De Niro), a veteran intelligence agent, joins a covert team for a lucrative assignment to seize a suitcase whose mysterious contents are coveted by both the Russian mafia and the IRA. This simple premise develops into countless twists and turns, double- and triple-crosses, along with some car chase sequences worthy of “Bullitt” and “The French Connection”.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Late director John Frankenheimer takes a boilerplate idea and milks it for all its worth, creating a tight, pounding thriller. Casting and performances are solid, but this truly is a director’s picture, with Frankenheimer’s keen sense of pacing and flavorful European locations contributing to an edge-of-your-seat experience.


    Visit Best Movies by Farr for more great DVD recommendations.

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