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  • January 20, 2010

    Best Movies by Farr: Edmund Goulding

    by John Farr

    John Farr recommends three unforgettable movies directed by Edmund Goulding.


    Grand Hotel (1932)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Stars Greta Garbo, Joan Crawford, Wallace Beery and John and Lionel Barrymore play out several interwoven stories, mixing drama, romance and murder, all occurring among the various guests at Berlin’s posh Grand Hotel.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    MGM – the most prestigious studio from Hollywood’s golden age – paints on the gloss for this first class ensemble production. Garbo and John Barrymore stand out as the doomed lovers, as does his brother, Lionel, who plays a timid and terminally ill clerk on his last spree. Grand Hotel was among the first MGM sound dramas to showcase two things: first, the studios’ unmatched ability to adapt serious literary material to motion pictures; and second, to attract and retain star talent. The movie still dazzles nearly seventy-five years after its release.


    The Dawn Patrol (1938)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    At the French headquarters of the British Royal Flying Corps, squadron commander Major Brand (Rathbone) is berated by WWI flying ace Capt. Courtney (Errol Flynn) for sending young, inexperienced pilots to their deaths over enemy lines in rickety planes. But after Courtney is reassigned to Brands position, he begins to realize the brutal, agonizing realities of deciding who will fly those dailyand almost always deadlyearly-morning missions.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    A scene-for-scene remake of Howard Hawks’s 1930 film of the same name, “Patrol” is an anguished World War I flier drama starring the dashing, seemingly unflappable Flynn, who inhabits his role with heroic gusto. Goulding wrenches great emotion out of the massacre-of-innocents scenario, dropping in on the doomed men as they quaff scotch and listen to the melancholy sound of the airmen’s gramophone before hopping into their jerry-built “crates.” Rathbone is excellent as the tortured desk commander accused of the gravest cynicism, and real-life Flynn bosom buddy David Niven supplies an additional punch as Courtney’s best man, Lt. Scott. See “Dawn Patrol,” a high-flying combat adventure with a conscience.


    Nightmare Alley (1947)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Stanton Carlisle is a carnival employee who over-reaches in his quest for fame and fortune. He picks up a mind-reading technique (which boils down to a bunch of sophisticated code) from trusting colleague Zeena (Blondell), then discards her for a younger woman and appropriates the code for himself. Now hitting the big-time in night-clubs, Stanton feels he can’t lose, but the higher he gets, the farther he’s bound to fall.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Edmund Goulding creates one of the screen’s most indelible noirs, with the seamy carnival world providing an ideal setting. Power excels against type as the sleazy Stanton (a role he loved playing), and Blondell brings the perfect cheap, faded quality to small-timer Zeena. Jules Furthman’s hard-boiled script keeps us guessing just how Stanton will eventually tumble. Dripping with a deliciously dark mood and atmosphere, mystery fans will find “Nightmare” right up their alleys.


    Visit Best Movies by Farr for more great DVD recommendations.

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  • January 19, 2010

    A Scouting Life: The Lorraine Motel

    by Sam Hutchins

    We cruised around the immediate vicinity of the Arcade looking for other possible locations. Kar Wai seemed to like the restaurant, and his process is fairly improvisational. If we could find someplace interesting to shoot close by he would incorporate it into the writing process. This is a highly unusual way to make a film but a refreshing and inspiring one. Playing such a significant role in shaping the story felt good.

    Turning a corner we saw a great motel. Seriously retro, it looked like it hadn’t been touched since the 1960’s. Seemed to be a pretty unusual find as low-rent places like that are rarely preserved so well. Kar Wai had added cheap motels to our list of locations to scout and this was a perfect example of one. I pulled out my journal to scratch down the name and address as Kar Wai, Darius and Stephane climbed out of the car.

    It struck me as I wrote down the name. The Lorraine Motel. Wasn’t that where… holy shit, it was, wasn’t it? This is where they murdered him, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. I was completely overwhelmed by sadness in such a deep way that it caught me off guard. I jumped out of the car to stop the guys.

    “Hey, we can’t scout this place.”

    “Why not?” asked Stephane.

    “This is the Lorraine Motel. It’s where Martin Luther King was assassinated.”

    “Oh no.”

    It’s interesting to watch sadness just wash across someone’s face like that. I imagine it’s what I looked like just a moment ago. The sorrow of the place was absolutely palpable. Even Kar Wai’s stoic visage changed a bit. Then Darius spoke.

    “Can’t we try anyway?” waving his arm at the motel. “This place is perfect.”

    My initial reaction was an almost physical sense of revulsion. The truth is, however, that Darius was being professional. I hate that the film business does that to you, but it does. The idea is to make the best film possible, and the place did have an ideal look. From a strictly visual perspective it was indeed a great location. Darius is an incredibly talented cinematographer, and he got that way by pushing hard to get the best looking places on film. As a Location Manager, however, I need to factor in all of the variables. Setting aside my humanity for a second, even if we were able to film there it would be a mistake to do so. It would be impossible for the actors to deliver any sort of decent performance working in such a place, or for the crew to function well. In any case we weren’t going to find out. Barely controlling my anger, I bit off my words.

    “We are not going to film here. We are not going to scout here. I will not allow it.” I meant it. I was prepared to prevent it physically, if need be.

    In a rare display of humanity, Kar Wai reached out and gently laid a hand on my shoulder.

    “Sam is right. This is a place of sadness. We are not filming here. I would like to take a look around though.” He looked to me as if for permission. I nodded my head in assent.

    I don’t want to give the wrong impression. Darius is a really good person, and one of the most empathetic men I’ve ever met. I’m sure that given a few minutes he would have come to his senses. His initial reaction was purely objective and mine was very much not. I can’t entirely explain it, as it’s not that I ever felt any particular connection to Dr. King. Yes, he was a great man, but I hadn’t ever given him much thought. Not until that moment, at least. I do have a great sense of history, though, and being confronted with the reality of what had happened he suddenly was of great import to me.

    As we toured what turned out to be part of The National Civil Rights Museum it was all I could do to keep the tears from flowing. Historically important as the place is, I’m still not sure I’d ever go back. The Lorraine Motel is preserved just as it was the day of the assassination. Statues have been built recreating the famous photo taken moments after the shot rang out, where Dr. King is sprawled on the balcony and the men with him point in the direction it came from. I couldn’t even bring myself to take any pictures, it was all just a bit too much.

    As we finished up the tour Kar Wai broke the silence.

    “Let’s go get a drink.”

    ….

    STAY TUNED FOR THE NEXT INSTALLMENT OF THE SCOUTING LIFE.

    Sam Hutchins has been working in film production for twenty years. He started as overnight security on the set of “Working Girl” while attending film school at NYU. Since 1995 he has been a location manager for some of the top names in the business. He’ll be blogging from a unique insider’s perspective on the filmmaking process, as well as speaking to his colleagues in the production community to share their experiences with you.

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  • January 15, 2010

    A Scouting Life: Living History in Memphis

    by Sam Hutchins

    I’d like to tell you we stayed in the Peabody Hotel but we did not.  It’s my favorite type of lodging: a grand old dowager of a place.  Lovely bones but just slightly tattered by now.  It’s also legendary for the family of ducks that live there.  Every morning a bellman brings the ducks down to the lobby in an elevator and marches them through it to the central fountain where they hang out.  Alas, the freight was too high.  Instead at least we checked into the Doubletree, which was fine and had the benefit of being across the street from the Peabody.  I was at least able to take my coffee in the lobby of the Peabody in the mornings and watch the ducks waddle.  I like watching ducks waddle.

    It felt good to be back in Memphis, and right for our film.  When we initially scouted the town without Kar Wai we had seen some intriguing possibilities for shooting.  Stephane and Darius loved the idea of shooting in Sun Recording Studios.  The original Sun Studio was just a small storefront with nothing particularly visual to recommend it.  Eventually it expanded to take over the soda fountain next door, and that is the section that currently holds the gift shop and museum entrance.  The guys were looking at the remaining elements of the soda fountain and contemplating restoring it to its earlier condition.

    I knew that was wildly unrealistic given the budget we were working with, and was a little surprised that Stephane didn’t see that as well.  He is a guy who generally understands the practicalities of budgetary limitations.  On the other hand he was very much Kar Wai’s muse and I could see the temptation to try making it work.  Darius is a brilliant artist but one of the least practically-minded people I know so him thinking it possible almost made sense.  Still I didn’t disabuse them of the notion for my own selfish reasons.  It allowed me to meet the owner and all the people who worked there.  For a guy who got physical chills the first time he went there thinking about walking in Jonny Cash’s footsteps that was just fine.  So we returned to Sun Studios.

    Kar Wai loved the place, but loved it for the right reasons.  His creative process is wildly impractical, and he’ll spend whatever it takes to get his movies right.  At the same time he is aware of how unaware he is.  Knowing how loose his process is he picks his spots, and he’d rather choose a location that works without too much expensive prep so he can afford additional time actually filming there.  He did appreciate the art that had been born there, though, and we all indulged ourselves with some time well spent hanging out.

    The staff at Sun is amazing.  Our tour guide was an absolutely lovely woman named Amy LaVere.  Aside from working at Sun she’s an incredibly talented singer and bass player, who also played Wanda Jackson in the film “Walk the Line”.  Pretty cool creds, if you ask me.  The guy working the snack bar there was Mike, who directs his own no budget horror films.  They are disgustingly bloody yet still funny in the way that early Troma films were.  It’s refreshing to be in a creative environment like that, and it definitely charged all of us up a little.  We all dumped a fortune in the gift shop, where I picked up all sorts of rare recordings that I treasure to this day, as well as the aforementioned Amy LaVere’s stuff.  Sometimes scouting isn’t exclusively about finding locations and this was one of those times.

    We moved on from Sun and took Kar Wai to the place I knew we were actually going to film.  That was the Arcade Restaurant.  I knew it was a great location for him the first time I laid eyes on it.   I believe it is Memphis’ oldest restaurant, and it looks like it came out of a time capsule.  So many things about it were right for us.  Still has the great neon sign out front, for starters.  The interior was ancient but well-maintained enough, and wasn’t treated like a museum but as an operating, busy diner.  It sits on a corner, which is always a plus because it provides better shooting angles than a normal, flush facade offers.  An entire wall was windows, allowing opportunity to shoot from outside in.  The cherry on the sundae is that the streetcar line runs outside.  Brilliant.

    Kar Wai agreed, and we photographed the hell out of the place.  My only concern was that they were proud of having been filmed before, several times.  Directors have varied takes on locations that were included in other films.  Some consider that reason enough to pass on a place, others could care less.  It speaks volumes about how hard Kar Wai is to figure out that months into the process with him I had no idea how he would feel on the matter.  Fortunately he was fine with it, and it even seemed to add cachet in his eyes that Jim Jarmusch had set significant parts of “Mystery Train” there.  His methods are much too deliberate to sign off on it right away but the ghost of a smile on his face was as good a sign of approval as Kar Wai is wont to give.

    ….

    STAY TUNED FOR THE NEXT INSTALLMENT OF THE SCOUTING LIFE.

    Sam Hutchins has been working in film production for twenty years. He started as overnight security on the set of “Working Girl” while attending film school at NYU. Since 1995 he has been a location manager for some of the top names in the business. He’ll be blogging from a unique insider’s perspective on the filmmaking process, as well as speaking to his colleagues in the production community to share their experiences with you.

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  • January 12, 2010

    Best Movies by Farr: Based in the Big Easy

    by John Farr

    Three essential films set in New Orleans.


    A Street Car Named Desire (1951)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Frayed Southern belle Blanche DuBois (Vivien Leigh) arrives in a seedy quarter of New Orleans, where she’s arranged to stay with her pregnant sister Stella (Kim Hunter) and coarse, hulking brother-in-law Stanley Kowalski (Marlon Brando). Right from the start, Blanche and Stanley are at odds, as he sees through her high-mannered facade to the neurotic, vulnerable woman beneath. Tensions soon escalate, as Stanley sets out to confront Blanche about money and her unseemly past.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Brando’s force-of-nature performance in Kazan’s “Streetcar” – an electrifying mix of brute physicality and smoldering sexuality – made Stanley Kowalski’s infamous bellow a permanent part of pop culture and Brando a household name. But the undeniable strength of this film, adapted from the smash Broadway play by Tennessee Williams, is driven as much by the witty, vivid dialogue and ensemble acting as it is the lead actor’s Method work. Leigh, Hunter, Karl Malden, Ruby Bond, and Nick Dennis are all terrific, and Alex North’s atmospheric jazz score enhances the tense, combustible interplay. Winner of five Oscars, this “Streetcar” offers an incredible ride.


    Dead Man Walking (1995)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    When Sister Helen Prejean (Susan Sarandon), a Catholic nun and anti-death-penalty activist, receives a letter from Matthew Poncelet (Sean Penn), soon to be executed for the rape and murder of two teenage girls, she resolves to pay him a visit. Though Matthew is far from sympathetic, Sister Helen agrees to be his spiritual advisor and advocate, and lobbies for a new hearing on Matthew’s sentence.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Adapted from Sister Helen Prejean’s non-fiction book by actor/director Tim Robbins, “Dead Man Walking” is an intense, harrowing account of one woman’s dogged attempt to assure spiritual (if not earthly) redemption for a condemned killer. Penn is ideally cast as the convict, but Susan Sarandon’s stripped-down performance as his spiritual guide is courageous, gut-wrenching work, fully meriting that year’s Oscar. Unavoidably depressing, “Dead Man Walking” is also very real, shedding light into spaces we could easily ignore, but shouldn’t.


    When the Levees Broke (2006)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    One year after Hurricane Katrina devastated the city of New Orleans, director Spike Lee returned to make this definitive account of the tragedy and its aftermath, as well as the egregious failures of government officials who were slow to respond to the catastrophe. Told in the words of those who lived through the calamity, this film offers a devastating look at the ravaging of Crescent City by a monster storm, and the shocking indifference that caused impoverished, mostly African-American residents of the Ninth Ward to suffer the greatest indignities.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Originally aired on HBO, Lee’s marathon “Requiem in Four Acts” covers in grim, engrossing detail the storm, the surge over the levees and resultant flood, the looting, the mass flight to the Superdome, the interminable waiting for help, FEMA’s slow, infuriatingly feeble response, and finally the efforts underway to rebuild this historic city. It is very much an emotional portrait, not a dry recitation of facts, and to that end the film is built around punchy interviews with survivors, local politicians, and celebrities like Harry Belafonte, Wynton Marsalis, Douglas Brinkley, and others with a deep connection to New Orleans. With its lyrical imagery and bluesy vibe, “Levees” is a film to contemplate, both for its
    justifiable outrage and its profound sense of lament.


    Visit Best Movies by Farr for more great DVD recommendations.

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  • January 12, 2010

    Best Movies by Farr: Southern Fried Films

    by John Farr

    John Farr ventures south for three of the finest films about the region.


    Inherit the Wind (1960)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    In this courtroom drama based on the landmark Scopes Monkey Trial of the 1920s, defense lawyer Henry Drummond (Spencer Tracy) and fundamentalist prosecutor Matthew Brady (March) face off when schoolteacher Bertram Cates (Dick York), is put in jail for teaching evolution in tiny Hillsboro, Tennessee, with the arrest instigated by his girlfriend’s disapproving father, Rev. Jeremiah Brown (Claude Akins).

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Kramer’s spellbinding film features a deft performance by Tracy as the rumpled, deceptively plain-spoken Drummond (modeled on Clarence Darrow), matched by March’s larger than life, virtuoso turn as Matthew Brady (based on William Jennings Bryan). Just sit back, pretend you’re sitting in that humid courtroom, and watch two old pros at work. You’ll re-live history. Also look for Gene Kelly in one of his only serious, non-dancing roles as a cynical journalist based on H.L. Mencken.


    In the Heat of the Night (1967)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Black San Francisco police Detective Virgil Tibbs (Sidney Poitier) ends up in wrong place at wrong time – the Deep South, where a murder has just been committed. Set up against a bigoted, wily sheriff (Rod Steiger), Tibbs must unravel the mystery and clear himself, watching his back in hostile territory.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Intense action drama boasts a tight script and a pair of explosive lead performances by Poitier and Steiger. “Heat” netted Oscars in most top categories that year – Picture, Actor (Steiger), Screenplay and Editing. And though Steiger won the award, it’s just as much Poitier’s movie. Director Jewison makes palpable the racial ignorance and poverty long ingrained in the Deep South.


    Mississippi Burning (1988)

    WHAT IT’S ABOUT:

    Alan Parker’s film recreates the true story of three civil rights workers who were murdered in Mississippi in 1964, and takes some dramatic license in doing so. Agents Rupert Anderson (Gene Hackman) and Alan Ward (Willem Dafoe) arrive down South to investigate the disappearance of the three men (two white, one black), and their warm welcome comes in the form of a burning KKK cross. Brad Dourif, R. Lee Ermey, Gailard Sartain and Michael Rooker make up this unsavory welcome party, and Frances McDormand is Dourif’s neglected wife. The FBI team must break through a small town’s wall of silence to solve the mystery, while trying to control violent retribution against the local black population.

    WHY I LOVE IT:

    Though detractors claim the movie inaccurately depicts a white FBI coming in to rescue helpless blacks, I disagree: the film features some extremely courageous black characters, and at the outset, the FBI seems more muddled than heroic. Regardless of debates on historical accuracy, the movie is breathlessly exciting and extremely well-played. Though McDormand was Oscar-nominated for the small but pivotal role of Mrs. Pell, the movie is Hackman’s, as he turns in his most explosive performance since “The French Connection”(and he also got an Oscar nod).


    Visit Best Movies by Farr for more great DVD recommendations.

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