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  • July 9, 2012

    Best Movies by Farr: Hud

    by John Farr

    John Farr recommends you revisit Paul Newman’s brilliant lead performance in this film.


    Hud (1963)

    What It’s About:
    This modern-day psychological Western concerns unfulfilled, resentful Texas rancher Hud Bannon (Paul Newman), and his uneasy relationships with distant, steely father Homer (Melvyn Douglas), sexy, weathered housekeeper Alma (Patricia Neal), and impressionable nephew Lon (Brandon de Wilde). Keeping everyone at arm’s length, Hud believes in looking out for himself alone, even when events at the ranch take a turn for the worse.

    Why I Love It:
    Strikingly photographed by James Wong Howe, Martin Ritt’s uncompromising, anti-hero Western broke new ground for a genre which, in the early ’60s, was still stuck in tired old conventions. The movie endures due to Newman’s brilliant lead performance as Hud, an arrested adolescent in a man’s body. All the acting is excellent-especially Oscar winners Patricia Neal as the sad, sensuous Alma, and Douglas as the leathery, principled father. Finally, Newman’s ability to inject pathos into such a cynical, unsympathetic character speaks volumes about his own talent. A spare and powerful film.

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  • July 9, 2012

    Best Movies by Farr: Rear Window

    by John Farr

    John Farr discusses one of Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpieces.


    Rear Window (1954)

    What It’s About:
    After breaking his leg on the job, photojournalist Jeff Jeffries (James Stewart) must pass the sweltering New York summer looking out his apartment window–into his neighbors’ windows-and his natural nosiness causes him to study a battling couple across the courtyard. When the woman disappears, Jeff suspects her husband, Lars Thorwald (Raymond Burr), of foul play, and enlists his adoring, high-society girlfriend Lisa Fremont (Grace Kelly) to help him investigate.

    Why I Love It:
    One of the most celebrated films in history, this classic takes its time, but once the tension starts building, it doesn’t stop until the heart-pounding conclusion is upon you. A new peak for Hitchcock in blending the story of a crime that may have happened with the dark side of human obsession–in this case, voyeurism. The movie marks a high point for James Stewart, who would be remembered as Hitchcock’s most human and vulnerable hero. And who can resist the bewitching Grace Kelly?

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  • June 28, 2012

    Best Movies by Farr: The Narrow Margin

    by John Farr

    John Farr discusses one of the most thrilling crime pictures with a surprise ending.


    The Narrow Margin (1952)

    What It’s About:
    Tough-talking LA detective Walter Brown (Charles McGraw) arrives in Chicago to escort a cynical mobster’s wife (Marie Windsor) to a California grand jury, where she plans to testify against her estranged husband. The mafia has other plans for Mrs. Neall-namely, to rub her out. After his partner is gunned down leaving Neall’s apartment, Brown is on high alert, and must outwit a team of gangsters who follow them onto a sleeper train but seem to have no idea what their female target looks like.

    Why I Love It:
    A smart, edge-of-your-seat thriller set almost entirely on a West Coast-bound train, “Margin” captivates thanks to its many sudden plot twists and ingenious central tension: Brown doesn’t know which of the men on-board is a gangster, and the hit men don’t know which of the female passengers to bump off. McGraw’s gritty, hardboiled cop and Windsor’s catty moll play off each other extremely well, and portly actor Paul Maxey adds a bit of mystique as an irritating, perhaps devious passenger. Snappy dialogue, crisp pacing, and even-handed direction keep Fleischer’s “Margin” flying like a bullet. Infinitely better than the 1990 remake.

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  • June 25, 2012

    Best Movies by Farr: Notorious

    by John Farr

    John Farr discusses one of his favorite Ingrid Bergman films.


    Notorious (1946)

    What It’s About:
    At the end of World War 2, American intelligence officers are busy tracking Nazis who’ve escaped to South America. They approach Alicia Hubermann (Ingrid Bergman), daughter of a condemned Nazi spy, to use her feminine wiles to implicate more of her father’s colleagues, including Alex Sebastian (Rains), ringleader of a clandestine group which is up no good. Before her specific assignment gets disclosed, however, Alicia and American agent Devlin (Cary Grant) become romantically involved, complicating matters going forward.

    Why I Love It:
    With director Hitchcock at his most subtle and inspired, this brilliant nail-biter seems only to improve with each viewing. The story of a fallen woman-first redeemed by love, then put in peril- is riveting throughout, and stars Grant and Bergman emit powerful on-screen chemistry. Acting laurels also go to supporting player Rains, who’s never been smoother or slimier than here, playing a Nazi agent who falls for the wrong girl. Don’t miss the climax, which is nothing less than pure, understated genius.

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  • June 24, 2012

    Nantucket Film Festival

    This week Reel 13 celebrates the Nantucket Film Festival. All three of our short film contenders are past NFF selections. The 17th annual Nantucket Film Festival will take place June 20-24, 2012.

    Be sure to watch each of the films and vote for your favorite – voting continues through Wednesday, June 27th at 5pm. The winner will be broadcast this Saturday, June 30th along with our Classic and Indie features, D.O.A. and Accidental Death of Joey by Sue.

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