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September 20, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Wyandanch in the town of Babylon has earned a reputation for being one of the poorest communities on Long Island. Surrounded by some of the most well-to-do areas in the United States, this working class hamlet has struggled with poverty and crime. But that’s all changing. Wyandanch is currently is the middle of a $500 million redevelopment plan, which calls for affordable housing, commercial businesses, infrastructure and transportation improvements. In our continuing series, Chasing the Dream, Long Island Business Report anchor Jim Paymar takes us to this little corner of Suffolk County to tell us what the plan could mean for other struggling communities across our area and across the country.

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Episode
September 10, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, 45 years ago today, the inmates in Attica Prison rose up, taking guards hostage in one of the most important moments in civil rights history. Their actions protested years of mistreatment in the Upstate New York prison, and the situation continued for four long days as prisoners negotiated with state officials for improved living conditions. On the last day, Governor Rockefeller ordered armed state troopers to storm the prison and retake it by force. That decision would cost 39 prisoners and hostages their lives. More than four decades later, historian Heather Ann Thompson will join us to discuss her book Blood in the Water: The Attica Prison Uprising of 1971 and Its Legacy and her journey to uncover hidden evidence for which no one has been held accountable.

Next, Sunday marks 15 years since the terror attacks of September 11, 2001, that killed nearly 3000 people at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. It’s a day New York City won’t soon forget, and we have built countless tributes to ensure that we don’t. Tonight, we take a look at a new documentary that chronicles the building of the 9/11 Memorial Plaza and the most overlooked aspects of the somber setting: the trees. Director of The Trees, Scott Elliott, and the Executive Producer Katherine Drew join us to discuss the 400 swamp white oaks that make-up one of New York City’s largest urban forests and the life they bring back to Ground Zero.

Finally, for more than 50 years, THIRTEEN has become a cornerstone for public television and story-telling. Household names in everything from politics to entertainment have been interviewed and have shared their lives with us, from Julia Child, to Bill Moyers, to Dick Cavett, and countless others. To honor more than half a century of ground-breaking programming, THIRTEEN will offer a special presentation of Pioneers of Thirteen, a look back into their rich archives spanning from the 1960’s to the present. Tonight, President and CEO of THIRTEEN Neal Shapiro joins us to discuss the four-part special and the many people that have helped to pioneer this network into the trusted platform it is today, from Edward R. Murrow to Dustin Hoffman.

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September 09, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Sunday marks 15 years since the terror attacks of September 11, 2001, that killed nearly 3000 people at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. It’s a day New York City won’t soon forget, and we have built countless tributes to ensure that we don’t. Tonight, we take a look at a new documentary that chronicles the building of the 9/11 Memorial Plaza and the most overlooked aspects of the somber setting: the trees. Director of The Trees, Scott Elliott, and the Executive Producer Katherine Drew join us to discuss the 400 swamp white oaks that make-up one of New York City’s largest urban forests and the life they bring back to Ground Zero.

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Episode
August 31, 2016 at 5:36 am

Tonight, former Congressman Anthony Weiner found himself in the midst of sex scandals, starting in 2011 and again in 2013. Recently, the New York Post ran a report alleging a sexting scandal with an unidentified woman who provided sexually explicit conversations and photos to the paper in exchange for anonymity. The cyber-trysts reportedly began over the internet in 2015, and Weiner’s wife Huma Abedin, who stood by him through the previous two scandals, confirmed yesterday that she’s separating from her husband. We discuss the story and a larger issue it brings to light: sex and porn addiction. Psychologist Dr. Jeff Gardere joins us to share his insights.

Then, 2017 is quickly approaching, and for Mayor Bill de Blasio, that would mean having to choose between running for re-election or passing the torch on to someone else. In 2013, de Blasio won the election in a landslide, with nearly 75% of the overall vote and 96% of the Black American vote. Nearly four years later, and the polls may show very different results. In fact, an influential group of Black church leaders is so disappointed with the mayor and some of his economic policies that it’s trying to ensure he doesn’t get a second term. Reverend Dr. Johnnie Green, Pastor of Mount Neboh Baptist Church in Harlem, is the President of Mobilizing Preachers and Communities, the group that is trying to oust de Blasio. Reverend Dr. Green used to fully support the mayor, but he joins us now to discuss why his support has dried up and how he is looking to change things around.

Finally, according to a recent study, nearly 64% of Nassau and Suffolk County renters cannot afford a typical two-bedroom apartment on Long Island. Pair that with fair housing law violations such as discrimination of potential renters, and Long Island quickly becomes a difficult place to thrive. What can be done to improve the island’s affordable and fair housing markets? President of Long Island Housing Partnership Peter Elkowitz and Executive Director of Long Island Housing Service Michelle Santantonio discuss that and how to make Long Island a more viable housing market for all in this latest installment of Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America.

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August 30, 2016 at 6:27 pm

According to a recent study, nearly 64% of Nassau and Suffolk County renters cannot afford a typical two-bedroom apartment on Long Island. Pair that with fair housing law violations such as discrimination of potential renters, and Long Island quickly becomes a difficult place to thrive. What can be done to improve the island’s affordable and fair housing markets? President of Long Island Housing Partnership Peter Elkowitz and Executive Director of Long Island Housing Service Michelle Santantonio discuss that and how to make Long Island a more viable housing market for all in this latest installment of Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America.

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Episode
August 10, 2016 at 5:36 am

Tonight, the neighborhood of Chelsea is a neighborhood of sharp contrasts. Home of The High Line, multi-million dollar condos, and tech giants like Google, Chelsea has seen rapid gentrification in the past three decades. And while many residents benefit from the development of the area, some in rent stabilized and public housing continue to struggle as prices and services rise. The New York Times housing reporter Mireya Navarro wrote an article that delved into the gentrification of this neighborhood, the wealth divide, and the anxious people who fear they will be forced out.

Then, he replaced Johnny Carson and made a name for himself on The Tonight Show, and now late-night legend Jay Leno joins us in a one-on-one interview to dish about his time on The Tonight Show, the current state of comedy, his car show Jay Leno’s Garage, and the presidential election. You won’t want to miss it.

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August 09, 2016 at 6:29 pm

The neighborhood of Chelsea is a neighborhood of sharp contrasts. Home of The High Line, multi-million dollar condos, and tech giants like Google, Chelsea has seen rapid gentrification in the past three decades. And while many residents benefit from the development of the area, some in rent stabilized and public housing continue to struggle as prices and services rise. The New York Times housing reporter Mireya Navarro wrote an article that delved into the gentrification of this neighborhood, the wealth divide, and the anxious people who fear they will be forced out.

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Episode
August 09, 2016 at 5:22 am

Race is one of the nation’s hot button issues, with opinions on all sides. Last year, The New York Times launched a series of documentaries titled Conversations on Race that examined race relations and discrimination. One of those documentaries, “A Conversation with Latinos on Race,” follows the intimate stories of 13 Latino Americans and reveals their challenges with race on […]

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April 01, 2016 at 6:26 pm

From his computer at home, data scientist Ben Wellington has changed the way we pay for MetroCards and cabs in New York City. Wellington is also the voice behind the popular blog “I Quant New York,” and he stops by to tell us how he’s using public data to take on the city’s problems.

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MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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