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July 01, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Every weekday over 200,000 people use the “L” train to shuttle between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and now, talks of a shutdown could mean that all of them would need to find another way to get around. The reason? The tunnel linking the two boroughs has needed repairs since Superstorm Sandy flooded the city in 2012. And while another option is on the table, that plan would take twice as long as a full tunnel shutdown and drastically reduce service on one of the city’s busiest subway lines. Vincent Barone, a transportation reporter for amNewYork, is on top of this story and joins us tonight to break down both options and tell us what a shutdown could mean for the city.

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Episode
June 04, 2016 at 6:45 am

Tonight, many lead-foot drivers haven’t been able to pass through a school zone undetected in the five boroughs since the introduction of speed cameras. And depending how you look at it, that might be a good thing, since city hall claims students being hit by cars is the leading cause of injury-related deaths for children under 14. So far, there are 140 of these cameras city-wide, issuing fines at fifty dollars for each offense. Now, lawmakers are looking to add over 2,000 more with the intention to run them 24/7 in order to diminish the amount of students being hit by cars. City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer joins us to discuss why he’s pushing Albany to place these cameras in front of all city schools and to debate the criticism against these cameras. Then, legendary entertainer Michael Feinstein has been dubbed the “Ambassador of the American Songbook,” and we sit down with him to talk about how he is using his talent to further entertain and educate and preserve American music classics. He lets us in on his latest projects in music and art and how they will leave lasting impressions on their audiences.

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June 03, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Many lead-foot drivers haven’t been able to pass through a school zone undetected in the five boroughs since the introduction of speed cameras. And depending how you look at it, that might be a good thing, since city hall claims students being hit by cars is the leading cause of injury-related deaths for children under 14. So far, there are 140 of these cameras city-wide, issuing fines at fifty dollars for each offense. Now, lawmakers are looking to add over 2,000 more with the intention to run them 24/7 in order to diminish the amount of students being hit by cars. City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer joins us to discuss why he’s pushing Albany to place these cameras in front of all city schools and to debate the criticism against these cameras.

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April 06, 2016 at 5:11 am

If you’re losing sleep over this election, we may have a remedy. In part one of our interview with Arianna Huffington, the founder of The Huffington Post and author of the new book The Sleep Revolution, the media mogul shares her views on the upcoming presidential election. Most New Yorkers have experienced a train delay that completely derails their day. […]

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April 01, 2016 at 6:26 pm

From his computer at home, data scientist Ben Wellington has changed the way we pay for MetroCards and cabs in New York City. Wellington is also the voice behind the popular blog “I Quant New York,” and he stops by to tell us how he’s using public data to take on the city’s problems.

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Episode
March 26, 2016 at 5:00 am

Forced out of their homes and onto the street for a crime they didn’t commit. It’s a new trend, based on an old law. We’ve got the story. New York is on the verge of becoming the last state in the country to legalize professional mixed martial arts. Earlier this week, members of the state assembly voted overwhelmingly in favor of bringing the sport back to the Empire State after a 20-year hiatus. But not everyone is backing MMA. We sit down with Assemblywoman Deborah Glick to discuss her opposition to one of the country’s fastest-growing sports. It’s spring time and that means it’s time for the New York International Auto Show at the Jacob Javits Center. It’s America’s most-attended auto show and kicks off today. We’re joined by automotive expert Mike Caudill for help navigating this year’s offerings of hybrids, muscle cars and futuristic concepts.

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Episode
March 24, 2016 at 5:00 am

In the Belgian capitol of Brussels on Tuesday, three bombs detonated at the city’s airport and metro station, killing dozens of people and injuring more than 100 others. The city was put on lock down as authorities searched for those behind the terror attacks. Here in New York City, the police department was put on high alert and increased its officer presence at transit hubs around the city. To help us sort out the details, we’re joined by former director of the Central Intelligence Agency Ambassador R. James Woolsey. We sit down with Manhattan Republican Party Chairwoman Adele Malpass and New York State Democratic Party Executive Director Basil Smilke to discuss the state of the election and how the candidates are faring. Who’s ahead? Who’s lagging? And who will win those coveted delegate votes? We’ll break down the most recent polls, dissect GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump’s relationship with the media and discuss how the attacks in Brussels could shift the candidates’ focus to national security. Andre Hatchett spent nearly 25 years in prison for a murder he did not commit. His 1991 conviction was based on an unreliable witness, a bad defense team and critical evidence that the prosecution never disclosed to the defense. More than two decades later he was finally exonerated of all charges and his conviction was reversed with the help of The Innocence Project, a national organization dedicated to freeing the wrongly convicted. The organization’s Co-Director Barry Scheck joins us to explain how Hatchett’s new legal counsel worked with the Brooklyn District Attorney’s Conviction Integrity Unit to expose the loopholes in his case and highlight how disturbingly easy it was to convict an innocent person in this country.

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MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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