Episode
December 17, 2016 at 7:18 am

ABC News correspondent Bob Woodruff gives us a fascinating look at how advances in military medicine are changing the lives of America’s service members. Woodruff, who was critically injured covering the War in Iraq in 2006 and was saved by military medical care, brings his personal understanding of the issues to this special half-hour exploration.

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Episode
November 24, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, nearly 60,000 people are sleeping in New York City shelters every night, according to the most recent statistics from City Hall. That number is up 18 percent since Mayor de Blasio took office two years ago, but city officials say congestion in shelters would be much worse if not for large investments in homeless programs. For many people on the streets, part of the problem is that they don’t know where their families are or how to contact them. That’s where Miracle Messages steps in. The organization uses videos and social media to track down and reunite the homeless with their families. The group’s founder, Kevin Adler, joins us tonight to talk more about the city’s homeless problem and the miracles his organization is facilitating every day.

Next, Koko the Gorilla isn’t your average ape. This 45-year-old primate was taught sign language as a youngster by an animal psychologist who has gone on to become her surrogate mother. For decades, Koko has received worldwide recognition for her ability to communicate with humans. But some in the scientific community are skeptical about her true ability to understand and respond to what people are saying. The documentary, Koko: The Gorilla Who Talks, from PBS and the BBC explores this remarkable animal’s life and the controversy surrounding her. Tonight we take a look at the film and sit down with the documentary’s producer to go inside Koko’s story.

Finally, while you snuggle up with your loved ones in front of the TV, what are some of the top films sure to get you in the holiday spirit? Our friends from Fandango share their list of the best season-starters.

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Episode
November 22, 2016 at 5:43 am

Tonight, the challenges of having a president-elect living in the heart of Manhattan are posing unprecedented problems for New York. News this weekend that future First Lady Melania Trump will stay in the city as Barron Trump finishes out the school year is only expected to further complicate plans to protect the incoming first family while also allowing New Yorkers to go about their daily lives. Former New York City traffic commissioner and leading transportation advocate Sam Schwartz, otherwise known as Gridlock Sam, tells us what the city can do to prevent “Trump-lock Armageddon.”

Next, President-Elect Donald Trump campaigned on repealing and replacing Obamacare, which he often called a catastrophe. But his recent interview on CBS 60 Minutes suggests he may have changed his mind about completely repealing the Affordable Care Act. Is the new posture merely a change in tone? And if he does still intend to at least radically reform Obamacare, how will the changes affect us here in New York? Paul Howard, senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, explores what healthcare could look like under a Trump administration.

Finally, for more than 140 years, New York city’s 92nd Street Y has been a valuable center for the arts, culture and the community. They are now expanding their reach to connect people and communities around the world with their newly named Belfer Center for Innovation and Social Impact. We look at how the new addition is re-imagining the role of the community center in the digital world, allowing everyone to give back and transform lives.

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November 21, 2016 at 6:27 pm

For more than 140 years, New York city’s 92nd Street Y has been a valuable center for the arts, culture and the community. They are now expanding their reach to connect people and communities around the world with their newly named Belfer Center for Innovation and Social Impact. We look at how the new addition is re-imagining the role of the community center in the digital world, allowing everyone to give back and transform lives.

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Episode
November 19, 2016 at 8:22 am

Tonight, after multiple setbacks and numerous protests, New York City is pressing play on its body camera program. The NYPD will be moving forward with a $6.4 million contract with the company VieVu to provide cameras and data storage for what would be one of the country’s largest body camera programs. Across the river in New Jersey, another city is already testing out police body cameras: Camden, one of the poorest and most dangerous cities in the country. But now, after decades of economic downturn and violent crime, change is coming with help from the newly formed police force. MetroFocus producer William Jones takes to the streets of Camden, where officers are testing out this new technology to improve policing.

Next, as life expectancy reaches an all-time high, we as a city are aging. More than 1.4 million New Yorkers are 60 years of age or older. By 2030 that number is estimated to swell to more than 1.8 million, or 20% of city residents, raising demand for affordable housing and health and social services. We get a look at how the nonprofit Selfhelp is answering that call, providing care and services to thousands of aging New Yorkers.

Finally, maybe you’ve caught a compelling story on The Moth Radio Hour on WNYC, downloaded a podcast, or been to a live “story-slam”. The Moth has been dedicated to the art of simple storytelling, told live on stage with no script, just a microphone, a spotlight and a room full of strangers. We caught a behind the scenes look at one woman’s personal storytelling journey from the rural mountains of Nepal to women’s health advocate as part of The Moth’s global community program “Women In The World,” recently performed at Jazz At Lincoln Center.

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November 18, 2016 at 6:43 pm

After multiple setbacks and numerous protests, New York City is pressing play on its body camera program. The NYPD will be moving forward with a $6.4 million contract with the company VieVu to provide cameras and data storage for what would be one of the country’s largest body camera programs. Across the river in New Jersey, another city is already testing out police body cameras: Camden, one of the poorest and most dangerous cities in the country. But now, after decades of economic downturn and violent crime, change is coming with help from the newly formed police force. MetroFocus producer William Jones takes to the streets of Camden, where officers are testing out this new technology to improve policing.

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November 14, 2016 at 6:27 pm

New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has found a new target: gun trafficking. A new report from his office called “Target on Trafficking” reveals the glaring trends he says are undermining New York’s strong gun laws, which are some of the toughest in the nation. In that report, was this glaring statistic: 74 percent of all crime guns recovered […]

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Episode
November 09, 2016 at 5:27 am

Tonight, today is a historic day in the making, but we don’t know how the election will turn out yet. It could be a blowout, a traditional victory that separates the candidates by several points, or it could be a real nail-biter such as the 2000 race between Al Gore and George W. Bush, where weeks of political disputes and recounting delayed the final results. Besides that infamous contest, which immortalized “the hanging chad,” what other election thrillers have there been in our nation’s history? Presidential historian and CNN contributor Tim Naftali joins us with a look back at more close calls in American election history.

Then, on June 11, 2016, 28-year-old Jessica White watched her children play on a playground outside of the John Adams Housing project in the Bronx. She was talking with her mother, Gola White when shots rang out in the area. In a split-second decision that any mother would have made, Jessica ran over to protect her three children; but that decision would ultimately cost her her life. Jessica White is just one of many who have fallen victim to crime in the Bronx’s 40th precinct, and although New York City crime is at a historic low, each tragic loss of life calls more attention to an issue of security in the South Bronx. To understand why these killings persist, The New York Times committed a team of reporters to the neighborhood at the beginning of this year. In a series of in-depth articles published throughout 2016, they documented the lives of those lost. Two members of that reporting team Benjamin Mueller and Al Baker join us tonight.

Finally, between 2001 and 2014, more than 5,300 U.S. service members were killed in action during the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, but out of the thousands of wounded soldiers who made it to combat hospitals, 96% made it home alive. Now, a new NJTV documentary, Military Medicine: Beyond the Battlefield, follows ABC News Correspondent Bob Woodruff to the front lines of medicine and explores how medical techniques have advanced and given hope to our wounded military service members.

Woodruff, who was critically injured in 2006 while covering the War in Iraq, joins us to share his deeply personal perspective towards military medicine and gives us a preview of the special before it airs on NJTV tomorrow night at 8 p.m. and nationally on PBS stations at 10 p.m. (Check your local listings).

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November 08, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Between 2001 and 2014, more than 5,300 U.S. service members were killed in action during the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, but out of the thousands of wounded soldiers who made it to combat hospitals, 96% made it home alive. Now, a new NJTV documentary, Military Medicine: Beyond the Battlefield, follows ABC News Correspondent Bob Woodruff to the front lines of medicine and explores how medical techniques have advanced and given hope to our wounded military service members.
Woodruff, who was critically injured in 2006 while covering the War in Iraq, joins us to share his deeply personal perspective towards military medicine and gives us a preview of the special before it airs on NJTV tomorrow night at 8 p.m. and nationally on PBS stations at 10 p.m. (Check your local listings).

Continue Reading