Clip
October 17, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Nearly 60,000 people are sleeping in New York City shelters every night, according to the most recent statistics from City Hall. That number is up 18 percent since Mayor de Blasio took office two years ago, but city officials say congestion in shelters would be much worse if not for large investments in homeless programs. For many people on the […]

Continue Reading

Episode
October 15, 2016 at 5:02 am

Tonight, New Yorkers in Harlem are furious with Jon Girodes, the Republican candidate running to represent their district in the New York State Senate. These feelings ignited after the candidate made promises to serve racially stereotypical food at a local campaign event. Residents of New York’s 30th District, a primarily Black community, are making it completely clear that they don’t approve of the Girodes’ comments to serve “Kool-Aid, KFC and Watermelons.” NBC 4 I-Team Investigative Reporter, Sarah Wallace broke the story and tonight, joins us to tell us more.

Then, what once was a place for New Yorkers to enjoy the simple pleasures of nature in the middle of a bustling Manhattan has now become the dangerous backdrop for a number of robberies, assaults, and gang violence. Cell phone robbery and brutal assaults by roaming gangs have been on the rise in Central Park, with multiple incidents reported in the past month. This week, a woman in the park was robbed and assaulted before she managed to get away during an attempted rape. Her alleged assailant was arrested two days later after authorities tracked him down by using the victim’s “Find My iPhone” app. Luckily, that story has a better ending than most, but the public still remains on edge as these crimes become a trend, despite the fact that police say crime is down for the year in Central Park by about 35 percent. New York City Park Advocates’ Geoffrey Croft joins us to make sense of the statistics and share how the police plan to ensure the public’s safety.

Finally, tensions are hitting an all-time high in police forces across the country as countless videos come to light showing police shootings of unarmed black men. As Americans grow more irate over daily headlines, the debate over the use of force has come to the forefront of policing. Some veteran cops are even admitting to feeling uneasy when they don their badges, but what is the next generation of this occupation thinking? Tonight, MetroFocus’ William Jones heads to Monroe College in the Bronx where their criminal justice program is moving away from textbook learning in favor of putting their students on the virtual front lines.

Continue Reading

Clip
October 14, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Tensions are hitting an all-time high in police forces across the country as countless videos come to light showing police shootings of unarmed black men. As Americans grow more irate over daily headlines, the debate over the use of force has come to the forefront of policing. Some veteran cops are even admitting to feeling uneasy when they don their badges, but what is the next generation of this occupation thinking? Tonight, MetroFocus’ William Jones heads to Monroe College in the Bronx where their criminal justice program is moving away from textbook learning in favor of putting their students on the virtual front lines.

Continue Reading

Episode
October 04, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, for one night only, America’s political focus will shift from presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton to their vice presidential picks, Indiana Governor Mike Pence and Virginia Senator Tim Kaine. Tomorrow night, these vice presidential candidates will take center stage at Longwood University in Virginia for their first and only debate before the election in November. In the past, vice presidential face-offs haven’t always been as momentous as the presidential debates, but in a race as contentious as this, is tomorrow’s debate going to be one to watch and will it have an impact? Amy Holmes, a political analyst for the polling company Rasmussen Reports, and former Newsday columnist Ellis Henican join us with a preview of the showdown.

Next, last week’s presidential debate clearly displayed the bitter hatred between candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, but it couldn’t hold a candle to the contention witnessed during the 1968 debates. Liberal Gore Vidal and Conservative William Buckley were bitter political enemies that the media followed closely during the two presidential conventions. The resulting fireworks between the ideological opposites would change political media coverage and shape it into the blood sport it is today. Tonight, Director and Producer Robert Gordon joins us to discuss his Independent Lens documentary, Best of Enemies, which examines these men and their rivalry and the film “Best of Enemies” before it airs tonight on PBS.

Then, it’s been over 15 years since Amadou Diallo was brutally killed by four New York City police officers in February of 1999. Although his name may be a forgotten headline for some, his mother Kadiatou, the message that was ignited by her son’s death is as important as ever. In fact, Kadiatou is worried that the country is headed in the wrong direction. She has said, “What is going on here is like many years ago…We’re going backwards, so each time I relive my tragedy.” And the same is true for the countless other mothers of unarmed, black men that lost their lives at the hands of the police, including Eric Garner, Akai Gurley, and many others. In this installment of Listening In, we take you to a panel discussion including Kadiatou and the mother of Eric Gardner where they discuss healing New York City’s communities and putting an end to events like the ones that claimed the lives of their sons.

Finally, Rosh Hashanah marks the beginning of the Jewish High Holidays. It’s a time of year when many in the Jewish community come together at their local synagogue for prayer, self-reflection and a greater sense of community. But for some, it’s physically impossible to make a trip to the synagogue. And for others, the attendance fees for holiday services may well be unaffordable. In an effort to reach more of their community, one synagogue on Long Island has gone high tech, and we take you there to see how they’re making the high holidays more accessible.

Continue Reading

Clip
October 03, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Rosh Hashanah marks the beginning of the Jewish High Holidays. It’s a time of year when many in the Jewish community come together at their local synagogue for prayer, self-reflection and a greater sense of community. But for some, it’s physically impossible to make a trip to the synagogue. And for others, the attendance fees for holiday services may well be unaffordable. In an effort to reach more of their community, one synagogue on Long Island has gone high tech, and we take you there to see how they’re making the high holidays more accessible.

Continue Reading

Episode
September 15, 2016 at 5:31 am

Tonight, results from yesterday’s primary may have disappointed some New York incumbents, but it turns out a dead man can still pull in votes. We let you know where the votes fell and who will be taking over political office. With what is sure to be an exciting general election quickly approaching in November, how do the results from yesterday shift power in New York?

Next, all studies point to one thing that has a positive effect on not only the success of an individual but the national economy they live in: a quality education. That simple fact doesn’t change that America, once known as one of the top countries in educational achievement, has fallen behind, especially in topics such as math and science. So what is keeping our nation’s students back and how can we become top achievers again in a global market that becomes more competitive with each day? A new Nova documentary, School of the Future, explores those questions and the challenges facing today’s students. Dr. Pamela Cantor is one of the subjects in this film and she will join us to discuss the issues our kids deal with in and out of the classroom.

Then, as America’s youth heads back to school, high school seniors are facing the daunting task of applying to college. Between taking the SATs, writing admissions essays, and completing scholarship applications, the payoff has increasingly been a rejection letter from some of the most elite schools in the world. It’s a hard blow for many students and their parents, but does the university you attend really determine how bright your future could be? The New York Times columnist Frank Bruni joins us to discuss the stressful time students have applying for college and whether picking the right school is as important as we think it is.

Finally, what makes the world round, the sky blue, or gives every snowflake a unique shape? Those seemingly unanswerable questions are explored in a new PBS series called Forces of Nature. This four-part series will show how we experience the natural forces that shape our world and the fundamental laws governing all life and matter on Earth. Tonight, PBS’ Vice President of Programming Bill Gardner will join us to discuss the making of Forces of Nature and what you can expect from the program before it premieres tonight.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 14, 2016 at 6:28 pm

All studies point to one thing that has a positive effect on not only the success of an individual but the national economy they live in: a quality education. That simple fact doesn’t change that America, once known as one of the top countries in educational achievement, has fallen behind, especially in topics such as math and science. So what is keeping our nation’s students back and how can we become top achievers again in a global market that becomes more competitive with each day? A new Nova documentary, School of the Future, explores those questions and the challenges facing today’s students. Dr. Pamela Cantor is one of the subjects in this film and she will join us to discuss the issues our kids deal with in and out of the classroom.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 14, 2016 at 6:26 pm

What makes the world round, the sky blue, or gives every snowflake a unique shape? Those seemingly unanswerable questions are explored in a new PBS series called Forces of Nature. This four-part series will show how we experience the natural forces that shape our world and the fundamental laws governing all life and matter on Earth. Tonight, PBS’ Vice President of Programming Bill Gardner will join us to discuss the making of Forces of Nature and what you can expect from the program before it premieres tonight.

Continue Reading

Episode
September 02, 2016 at 5:28 am

Tonight, he’s made you chuckle in beloved film classics like The Princess Bride, City Slickers, and When Harry Met Sally…, but now Emmy and Tony award winner Billy Crystal takes the anchor chair tonight for a very special interview with baseball legend Joe Torre.

Joe Torre may be responsible for one of the most successful periods in recent Yankees history, but until 1995, his childhood remained a relative mystery. Joe’s father was a respected NYPD detective, a pillar in the community and a symbol of safety in their neighborhood, but behind the closed doors of his Brooklyn home, it was anything but safe. Decades later, Torre began to open up about the abuse he and his family endured, which led to the creation of the Joe Torre Safe at Home Foundation. Tonight, Joe and his wife, Ali Torre, discuss Joe’s childhood and how their foundation works to give hope to those suffering from domestic abuse at home.

Next, without a doubt, one of the biggest fads of the summer has been Pokemon GO, a mobile app that brings the animated Japanese anime to life. Since the app’s release in early July, users have had the opportunity to virtually catch and collect Pokemon in their communities and around the world. It sounds harmless enough, but a report by New York State Senators Jeffrey Klein and Diane Savino found that many of these Pokemon wound up popping up at addresses of known sex offenders in New York City. New York State Senator Jeffrey Klein joins us to discuss bills he and other lawmakers are sponsoring and how he hopes to help kids still have fun playing Pokemon GO and similar games while ensuring their safety.

Finally, Huma Abedin may be making headlines as the now estranged and embarrassed wife of disgraced former Congressman Anthony Weiner, but she is not just the woman who stood by his side through his first two sexting scandals as well as his 2013 campaign for mayor of New York City. Abedin is one of the top aides and closest confidantes to Democratic Presidential Nominee Hillary Clinton and an instrumental part of the campaign trail. She’s been described as the candidate’s second daughter and has even stood in for Clinton at several campaign-related events. Even though she lives and works so close to the public eye, the question still remains: Who, exactly, is Huma Abedin? Vanity Fair Contributing Editor William D. Cohan joins us to shine some light on the story behind this enigmatic political figure.

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, Ellen and James S. Marcus, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross.

WNET

© 2017 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019