Episode
November 15, 2016 at 5:30 am

Bullying in schools is reportedly on the rise after President-elect Trump’s victory last week. Parents across the Tri-state are already raising concerns after hearing about taunting between classmates involving the campaign. Tonight we take a look at the issue with help from NBC New York, which recently investigated reports of bullying in Suffolk County, Long Island. Then we’ll be joined […]

Continue Reading

Clip
November 14, 2016 at 6:27 pm

New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has found a new target: gun trafficking. A new report from his office called “Target on Trafficking” reveals the glaring trends he says are undermining New York’s strong gun laws, which are some of the toughest in the nation. In that report, was this glaring statistic: 74 percent of all crime guns recovered […]

Continue Reading

Episode
November 09, 2016 at 5:27 am

Tonight, today is a historic day in the making, but we don’t know how the election will turn out yet. It could be a blowout, a traditional victory that separates the candidates by several points, or it could be a real nail-biter such as the 2000 race between Al Gore and George W. Bush, where weeks of political disputes and recounting delayed the final results. Besides that infamous contest, which immortalized “the hanging chad,” what other election thrillers have there been in our nation’s history? Presidential historian and CNN contributor Tim Naftali joins us with a look back at more close calls in American election history.

Then, on June 11, 2016, 28-year-old Jessica White watched her children play on a playground outside of the John Adams Housing project in the Bronx. She was talking with her mother, Gola White when shots rang out in the area. In a split-second decision that any mother would have made, Jessica ran over to protect her three children; but that decision would ultimately cost her her life. Jessica White is just one of many who have fallen victim to crime in the Bronx’s 40th precinct, and although New York City crime is at a historic low, each tragic loss of life calls more attention to an issue of security in the South Bronx. To understand why these killings persist, The New York Times committed a team of reporters to the neighborhood at the beginning of this year. In a series of in-depth articles published throughout 2016, they documented the lives of those lost. Two members of that reporting team Benjamin Mueller and Al Baker join us tonight.

Finally, between 2001 and 2014, more than 5,300 U.S. service members were killed in action during the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, but out of the thousands of wounded soldiers who made it to combat hospitals, 96% made it home alive. Now, a new NJTV documentary, Military Medicine: Beyond the Battlefield, follows ABC News Correspondent Bob Woodruff to the front lines of medicine and explores how medical techniques have advanced and given hope to our wounded military service members.

Woodruff, who was critically injured in 2006 while covering the War in Iraq, joins us to share his deeply personal perspective towards military medicine and gives us a preview of the special before it airs on NJTV tomorrow night at 8 p.m. and nationally on PBS stations at 10 p.m. (Check your local listings).

Continue Reading

Clip
November 08, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Between 2001 and 2014, more than 5,300 U.S. service members were killed in action during the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, but out of the thousands of wounded soldiers who made it to combat hospitals, 96% made it home alive. Now, a new NJTV documentary, Military Medicine: Beyond the Battlefield, follows ABC News Correspondent Bob Woodruff to the front lines of medicine and explores how medical techniques have advanced and given hope to our wounded military service members.
Woodruff, who was critically injured in 2006 while covering the War in Iraq, joins us to share his deeply personal perspective towards military medicine and gives us a preview of the special before it airs on NJTV tomorrow night at 8 p.m. and nationally on PBS stations at 10 p.m. (Check your local listings).

Continue Reading

Episode
November 03, 2016 at 5:52 am

Tonight, by the end of the 21st century, over 80% of the world’s population will live in cities just like New York. But with a projected world population reaching over 10 billion by the year 2050, that migration to cities calls a series of global megatrends to attention, including climate change, growing income inequality, disparities in education and health, and unaffordable housing. These megatrends threaten the security of some of our greatest regions of economic and social innovations, as well as the overall ability of the Earth to sustain the resources to accommodate for a growing world population. Author and urban planner Jonathan Rose joins us to discuss some key strategies that will help create a harmonious, urban society as outlined in his book The Well-Tempered City: What Modern Science, Ancient Civilizations and Human Behavior Teach Us About the Future of Urban Life.

Then, we shine a light on what has been called one of the most powerful generations heading to the ballot box next week. Millennials, now a group close to 80 million in number, could play a crucial role in electing the next president… that is if they show up to the polls. In 2008, 51 percent of millennials cast their vote for the president, and in 2012, that number only decreased. This year, things might be looking up for this generation, as more and more get involved in politics spanning all walks of American life. A few weeks after the votes were counted in 2012, millennials David and Jack Cahn packed their bags and began a two-year road trip across the country to figure out how their peers would reshape America’s future. After more than 10,000 interviews, their journey led them to us, and tonight, they are sharing the findings from their trip in their new book, When Millennials Rule.

Finally, gems, metals, and power: They’re aspects of our everyday lives, and in their own ways, they are the very backbone of our modern-day civilization. Their history, the science behind their creation, and the vital roles they’ve played in the formation of society are documented in a new, three-part series from NOVA, called Treasures of the Earth. The producer, director, and writer behind this television event, Doug Hamilton joins us tonight with an exciting inside look at the series and shares his perspective on what makes these treasures so vital to the society in which we live.

Continue Reading

Clip
November 02, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Gems, metals, and power: They’re aspects of our everyday lives, and in their own ways, they are the very backbone of our modern-day civilization. Their history, the science behind their creation, and the vital roles they’ve played in the formation of society are documented in a new, three-part series from NOVA, called Treasures of the Earth. The producer, director, and writer behind this television event, Doug Hamilton joins us tonight with an exciting inside look at the series and shares his perspective on what makes these treasures so vital to the society in which we live.

Continue Reading

Episode
October 29, 2016 at 5:41 am

Tonight, Nate Silver has earned a reputation for getting it very right when it comes to our presidential elections. He first burst onto the scene in 2008, when he correctly predicted the results of the presidential race in 49 out of 50 states. Then he shocked everyone by getting all 50 states right in 2012. Now Silver is back at it again. Tonight, Nate Silver joins us to share what his team at FiveThirtyEight, the Manhattan-based website that uses statistical analysis to forecast results and predict outcomes in everything from politics to sports, is forecasting for Election night. It’s a segment you surely don’t want to miss!

Next, October is National Bullying Prevention Month, and in this age of technology and social media, a bully’s reach goes far beyond the classroom. Cyberbullying puts harassment on a more public stage: the internet, where photos, videos, and text can circulate far beyond verbal attacks. Now, students from New York City schools are teaming up with AT&T to raise awareness about the reach of online bullying through film. MetroFocus’ Andrea Vasquez shows us how these young filmmakers are making an impact and speaking out against cyberbullying.

Then, Director Sidney Lumet is known for his mastery in cinema and his ability to pull first-rate performances out of the actors in his films. He’s had a hand in cinematic classics like 12 Angry Men, Dog Day Afternoon, and Network, but now he’s stepping in front of the camera in American Master’s By Sidney Lumet. This documentary casts a lens over his life and 50-year career as one of the most accomplished and influential directors in the history of film. The documentary’s director, Nancy Buirski, joins us to discuss this Hollywood legend ahead of the film’s premiere tonight at New York City’s Lincoln Plaza Cinema and on PBS in early 2017.

Finally, Halloween is only three days away! If you don’t have any petrifying plans yet, never fear, because tonight, we’ll be sitting down with David Goldberg from Time Out New York to get some of the best haunts in the city. Whether you’re looking for family-friendly Jack-o-lantern jamborees, ghost tours, or a politically themed haunted house, we’ll let you know about all the Halloweekend events you definitely don’t want to miss out on.

Continue Reading

Clip
October 28, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Nate Silver has earned a reputation for getting it very right when it comes to our presidential elections. He first burst onto the scene in 2008, when he correctly predicted the results of the presidential race in 49 out of 50 states. Then he shocked everyone by getting all 50 states right in 2012. Now Silver is back at it […]

Continue Reading

Episode
October 27, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, new developments in the Eric Garner case are making headlines today as the Justice Department shakes up the investigation against Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD officer responsible for putting Garner in the chokehold that became the catalyst for his death. Garner’s last words, “I can’t breathe,” caused national outrage and have become a mantra for Black Lives Matter protests and the conversation surrounding the use of force in police encounters. The New York Times reports that the Justice Department replaced the federal investigators handling the case in Brooklyn with their counterparts from Washington D.C. While New York feds are furious about the decision, saying that the shuffle is a move to make an example of Pantaleo, some believe that it’s a step in ensuring that justice is served. Tonight, former NYPD lieutenant Darren Porcher weighs in on this case and the significance of this shift in power.

Next, earlier this year, a water main break on the Upper West Side flooded the streets, damaged basements, and opened up a large sinkhole on Amsterdam Avenue that swallowed an SUV. This is hardly a first for New York. Last year an even larger sinkhole swallowed a whole intersection in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn. This phenomenon of the ground suddenly and unexpectedly collapsing beneath our feet is occurring more frequently around the globe and is a dangerous and sometimes even fatal occurrence. The threat they pose and their causes are documented in the NOVA film, Sinkholes— Buried Alive. Tonight, we’ll take an in-depth look at the film with its producer Larry Klein.

Then, while there have been monumental victories in the fight for equality among the LGBT community, advocates are quick to point out that there is still a long way to go. In fact, many LGBT youth are rejected by their own families and forced to leave home because of their sexuality. Studies show that LGBTQ youth make up about 40 percent of the homeless youth population in New York City. Not only that, but LGBTQ youth on the streets experience higher rates of sexual assault, violence, trauma, HIV infection, mental health issues, and substance abuse compared to their heterosexual peers living on the streets. The Ali Forney Center is dedicated to helping this vulnerable part of the population, providing safe shelter, health care, and a nurturing environment to get young people back on their feet. In this latest installment of Giving Back, we Listen In to a recent benefit gala the Ali Forney Center held to honor the legacy of the late Bea Arthur, an actress who fought for LGBT rights and was a key benefactor for the center’s work.

Finally, dealing with big oil, poachers and gunfire is nothing new to animal rescue missions in Africa. But while much attention has been paid to the real possibility that elephants and rhinos could be extinct within two decades, wildlife experts may have let giraffes slip through the cracks to suffer their own “silent extinction.” One particularly committed giraffe researcher, however, has not ignored their plight, and with his family and extended rescue team, has committed himself to relocating and protecting these long-necked-leaf-eaters before it’s too late. PBS Nature’s executive producer, Fred Kaufman joins us with a look at the series’ new documentary Giraffes: Africa’s Gentle Giants which shines a light on the efforts to protect these threatened animals.

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, Ellen and James S. Marcus, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross.

WNET

© 2017 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019