Episode
June 23, 2016 at 6:35 pm

A simple walk down 8th Avenue would be more than enough proof that New York City deals with homelessness on a broad scale. Shelters overflow with men, women, and children on a daily basis, and it’s to the point where the city is relying on low-budget hotels to house the homeless along with regularly paying guests. WPIX-11’s Jay Dow and Mario Diaz started reporting on New York’s homelessness crisis more than one year ago, before the subject started making major headlines. This special Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America episode of MetroFocus goes into the new reality of homelessness across our region and takes takes us into the shelters that you might have stayed in during your last stay in the city.

Continue Reading

Episode
June 21, 2016 at 5:30 am

We’re kicking off this week by celebrating the LGBT community, as the city gears up in anticipation of the Pride Parade that is taking place this coming Sunday. But while this month is a celebration of the rights this community has obtained thus far, it is important to remember that there is still much to do. Michealangelo Signorile, radio talk show host and a leading voice for gay activism, is here to tell us why homophobia is still very much an issue that this community faces and what’s next in their fight. Next, last week in our nation’s capitol, both elected representatives and the media gathered to break bread at the 72nd Annual Radio and Television Correspondents’ Association Dinner. The night, normally intended for putting partisanship aside and enjoying each others company, usually involves a few laughs courtesy of a featured entertainer. But this year’s speaker, Daily Show Correspondent Hasan Minhaj, wasn’t there just for the comedy. We listen in to his sobering speech concerning gun control laws in the wake of the Orlando massacre. Finally, Pride Month all started on June 28th, 1969, when LGBT New Yorkers rioted following a police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in the West Village that was a safe haven for those in the community. The raid, and subsequent riot, was the spark that ignited the modern gay rights movement, and is still celebrated each June. Decades later, the mass shooting at a gar night club in Orlando is a remind of how far the LGBT community still has to go in their quest for equality and to feel safe. The community will continue marching forward for this year’s Pride Month, with countless gatherings, rallies, fundraisers, parades, and parties planned. Having trouble deciding which celebrations to participate in and show your pride? Time Out New York editor Will Pulos is here to tell you about the top five blowouts that you don’t want to miss.

Continue Reading

Clip
June 20, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Pride Month all started on June 28th, 1969, when LGBT New Yorkers rioted following a police raid on the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in the West Village that was a safe haven for those in the community. The raid, and subsequent riot, was the spark that ignited the modern gay rights movement, and is still celebrated each June. Decades later, the mass shooting at a gar night club in Orlando is a remind of how far the LGBT community still has to go in their quest for equality and to feel safe. The community will continue marching forward for this year’s Pride Month, with countless gatherings, rallies, fundraisers, parades, and parties planned. Having trouble deciding which celebrations to participate in and show your pride? Time Out New York editor Will Pulos is here to tell you about the top five blowouts that you don’t want to miss.

Continue Reading

Episode
June 03, 2016 at 6:41 am

Tonight, New York City food pantries have been running dry and that’s on top of Mayor DeBlasio proposing further funding cuts in his preliminary fiscal budget. Now, the organization Food Bank For New York City is asking the mayor to up funding from $8.2 million to $22 million in order to support the emergency food assistance program. The Vice President for Research and Public Affairs for this organization, Triada Stampas, sits down with us to explain the strain budget cuts have put on the city’s food banks and pantries and how they are working with the Mayor and city council to rectify the issue. We’re also joined by 69-year-old Myriam Rias. She’s worked her entire life but is still dependent on these pantries to feed her family. She offers us her thoughts on the impact further cuts will have on her livelihood and health. Next, he made millions building and selling tech companies and now he’s a star investor, swimming with the sharks on ABC’s hit show Shark Tank. Robert Herjavec, in his new book You Don’t Have to Be A Shark: Creating Your Own Success, draws from his life experiences to share tips on how you too can strike it rich using the skills you didn’t know you had. Then finally, you may know her as Thelma Harper in the hit ’80’s sitcom Mama’s Family but she’s also an alum of The Carol Burnett Show. Tonight, Vicki Lawrence is here reminiscing about some classic moments from The Carol Burnett Show ahead of the upcoming PBS special Carol Burnett’s Favorite Sketches where comedy legend Carol Burnett walks us through the stories behind some of her favorite scenes.

Continue Reading

Clip
June 02, 2016 at 8:12 pm

New York City food pantries have been running dry and that’s on top of Mayor DeBlasio proposing further funding cuts in his preliminary fiscal budget. Now, the organization Food Bank For New York City is asking the mayor to up funding from $8.2 million to $22 million in order to support the emergency food assistance program. The Vice President for Research and Public Affairs for this organization, Triada Stampas, sits down with us to explain the strain budget cuts have put on the city’s food banks and pantries and how they are working with the Mayor and city council to rectify the issue. We’re also joined by 69-year-old Myriam Rias. She’s worked her entire life but is still dependent on these pantries to feed her family. She offers us her thoughts on the impact further cuts will have on her livelihood and health.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 21, 2016 at 5:59 am

She was one of the more than fifty women featured in The New York Times’ recent expose about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s treatment of women. Barbara Res was the lead engineer on the Trump Tower project, and now she’s sharing her experience working for the billionaire businessman. In light of some of Trump’s more controversial comments, how does she feel about her former boss seeking the highest office? Earlier this month, the New York state legislature passed a bill to raise New York’s minimum wage from $9 an hour to as much as $15 an hour. But how much you make may all depend on where you live in New York. Upstate workers will only reach $12.50 an hour, and that increase won’t be met until 2021. Though the legislation has been hailed as a victory by many in the state and around the country, for some low wage earners and small business owners, the pay increase comes with a dose of uncertainty. Jenna Flanagan has the story. Next, for 70 years, the non–profit Northside Center for Child Development in New York City has been an important resource for making sure children and families that are touched by mental illness have access to the support, acceptance and enrichment they deserve. For National Mental Health Awareness Month, ABC News correspondent and anchor Deborah Roberts, who supports the non-profit, and Dr. Thelma Dye, the center’s executive director, share how they are working to overcome the stigmas associated with mental health conditions. Then finally,over the course of a handful of months, New York Magazine reporters went to one block in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn. They knocked on every door, crashed the block party, and hunted through public records to track down and interview over sixty current and former block residents. The results not only revealed the transformation of the people there, but also the history of a single neighborhood over the past 135 years. Senior Editor of New York Magazine Genevieve Smith shares their story.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 20, 2016 at 6:25 pm

Over the course of a handful of months, New York Magazine reporters went to one block in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn. They knocked on every door, crashed the block party, and hunted through public records to track down and interview over sixty current and former block residents. The results not only revealed the transformation of the people there, but also the history of a single neighborhood over the past 135 years. Senior Editor of New York Magazine Genevieve Smith shares their story.

Continue Reading

Episode
April 13, 2016 at 5:26 am

The political climate is heating up here in New York as Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton prepare to duke it out Thursday night in Brooklyn. So what can we expect when they take center stage for their debate later this week? Political analyst and Sanders supporter Nomiki Konst joins Mike Morey, a Clinton backer and the former communications director for New York Senator Chuck Schumer, for a preview of the much anticipated debate.
The gloves have been off for quite some time, and as the New York primary campaign wages on, there’s little suggestion the tides will change. Indeed, Texas Senator and Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz’s first appearance in the city was met with jeering and heckling. Even Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. had words for the candidate, calling him a “hypocrite.” He explains his position with us. Next, the remarkable life of baseball legend Jackie Robinson is the focus of Ken Burns latest series airing tonight on PBS. Years since the baseball luminary’s passing, he continues to excite public fascination, but for those who actually lived this history firsthand, it left an indelible mark. Media legend Larry King shares what it was like to witness Robinson take to the field for the first time. Finally, anyone who has visited Central Park knows it’s not just a walk in any old park, but a 750-acre nature oasis in the middle of a bustling metropolis. Well, tune in tonight and prepare to explore the city parks that have transformed the face of our country. The PBS and WTTW series 10 That Changed America transports viewers to the public spaces that have influenced the way we live, work, and play. Of course, Central Park and the High Line get their 15 minutes and for good reason.

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

WNET

© 2016 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019