clip
October 26, 2016 at 6:29 pm

New developments in the Eric Garner case are making headlines today as the Justice Department shakes up the investigation against Daniel Pantaleo, the NYPD officer responsible for putting Garner in the chokehold that became the catalyst for his death. Garner‘s last words, “I can’t breathe,” caused national outrage and have become a mantra for Black Lives Matter protests and the […]

Continue Reading

episode
October 26, 2016 at 5:46 am

Tonight, it was Halloween night in 1975 when the quiet town of Greenwich, Connecticut, discovered the body of 15-year-old Martha Moxley, who had been bludgeoned to death with a golf club. The gruesome murder caused a lot of buzz with law enforcement and the media, but it took 27 years to make a conviction in the case. Michael Skakel, a neighbor of the victim and relative of the famous Kennedy family, was convicted and sentenced to 20 years to life behind bars despite the scant amount of evidence connecting him to the crime. He would go on to serve 11 years of his sentence until he was released when a judge threw out his conviction citing an unfair trial with inept defense. After all that time, Robert Kennedy Jr. is releasing his book, Framed: Why Michael Skakel Spent Over a Decade in Prison For a Murder He Didn’t Commit, which gives the acclaimed attorney the chance to shed new light on the case, attempt to prove his cousin’s innocence, and add two more names to the list of suspects. Tonight, Robert Kennedy Jr. joins us to discuss this thrilling exposé and why he felt writing this book was necessary.

Then, we continue our conversation with television producer Norman Lear, who is the latest subject of the new American Masters documentary depicting his life. The documentary, titled Norman Lear: Another Version of You, takes a look at how he became the man behind the screen that shaped a new generation of sitcoms in the 1970’s. Tonight, we switch gears from his legendary career to his heart for political activism, speaking on subjects such as organizations he has started and what his opinions are concerning this current Presidential election.

Finally, this year, millenials are not the only youth who will vote in the election, some high schoolers will also gain the privilege to head to the polls and cast their voteS on Election Day. But the reality is, most of them won’t show up, as youth voter turnout is at an all-time low. During the 2014 midterm election, only 20 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds participated in the election, which is the lowest youth turnout in the past 40 years. Gina Figliozzi, a recent graduate from Smithtown High School East on Long Island, wanted to try and turn those dismal numbers around. After voting for the first time during April’s primaries, she made a poster in the hope that she would interest her peers to vote. Her teacher, Tim Needles, took notice of the poster and entered it in a national contest from PBS LearningMedia called “Meet Me in D.C.” Out of 400 entries, Gina was chosen to be one of the competition’s two winners and earned herself a free trip to Washington D.C. She joins us tonight with Tim Needles to discuss why youth turnout on Election Day is going to be vital, and why simple acts like hers could make a difference.

Continue Reading

clip
October 25, 2016 at 6:29 pm

It was Halloween night in 1975 when the quiet town of Greenwich, Connecticut, discovered the body of 15-year-old Martha Moxley, who had been bludgeoned to death with a golf club. The gruesome murder caused a lot of buzz with law enforcement and the media, but it took 27 years to make a conviction in the case. Michael Skakel, a neighbor of the victim and relative of the famous Kennedy family, was convicted and sentenced to 20 years to life behind bars despite the scant amount of evidence connecting him to the crime. He would go on to serve 11 years of his sentence until he was released when a judge threw out his conviction citing an unfair trial with inept defense. After all that time, Robert Kennedy Jr. is releasing his book, Framed: Why Michael Skakel Spent Over a Decade in Prison For a Murder He Didn’t Commit, which gives the acclaimed attorney the chance to shed new light on the case, attempt to prove his cousin’s innocence, and add two more names to the list of suspects. Tonight, Robert Kennedy Jr. joins us to discuss this thrilling exposé and why he felt writing this book was necessary.

Continue Reading

clip
October 25, 2016 at 6:28 pm

We continue our conversation with television producer Norman Lear, who is the latest subject of the new American Masters documentary depicting his life. The documentary, titled Norman Lear: Another Version of You, takes a look at how he became the man behind the screen that shaped a new generation of sitcoms in the 1970’s. Tonight, we switch gears from his legendary career to his heart for political activism, speaking on subjects such as organizations he has started and what his opinions are concerning this current Presidential election.

Continue Reading

clip
October 25, 2016 at 6:27 pm

This year, millenials are not the only youth who will vote in the election, some high schoolers will also gain the privilege to head to the polls and cast their voteS on Election Day. But the reality is, most of them won’t show up, as youth voter turnout is at an all-time low. During the 2014 midterm election, only 20 percent of 18- to 29-year-olds participated in the election, which is the lowest youth turnout in the past 40 years. Gina Figliozzi, a recent graduate from Smithtown High School East on Long Island, wanted to try and turn those dismal numbers around. After voting for the first time during April’s primaries, she made a poster in the hope that she would interest her peers to vote. Her teacher, Tim Needles, took notice of the poster and entered it in a national contest from PBS LearningMedia called “Meet Me in D.C.” Out of 400 entries, Gina was chosen to be one of the competition’s two winners and earned herself a free trip to Washington D.C. She joins us tonight with Tim Needles to discuss why youth turnout on Election Day is going to be vital, and why simple acts like hers could make a difference.

Continue Reading

episode
October 25, 2016 at 5:30 am

After 11 Tony awards, a Pulitzer Prize, and sold out shows until summer of 2017, it’s no doubt: Hamilton is Lin-Manuel Miranda’s biggest Broadway hit to date. In July, Miranda stepped away from the show and his role as the title character, Alexander Hamilton. The torch passed on to his alternate, Javier Muñoz, who has been stepping in as Hamilton […]

Continue Reading

clip
October 24, 2016 at 6:29 pm

After 11 Tony awards, a Pulitzer Prize, and sold out shows until summer of 2017, it’s no doubt: Hamilton is Lin-Manuel Miranda‘s biggest Broadway hit to date. In July, Miranda stepped away from the show and his role as the title character, Alexander Hamilton. The torch passed on to his alternate, Javier Muñoz, who has been stepping in as Hamilton […]

Continue Reading

clip
October 24, 2016 at 6:28 pm

New York City, home to over 8 million residents, has a history of bringing people together across all religions, races, and social classes. Now, 3,000 religious leaders are preparing to gather at the Jacob Javits Center for this year’s Movement Day Global Cities, an annual conference that aims to address various issues facing New York and other major cities all […]

Continue Reading

clip
October 24, 2016 at 12:01 pm

Victoria Pannell may only be 17 years old, but that hasn’t stopped her from leaving her mark on the world through activism and social justice. Pannell has been a vocal figure on a variety of issues ranging from stemming the K2 epidemic to calling for relief for victims of Hurricane Katrina.  One issue, however, stands above the rest.  At 13 […]

Continue Reading