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August 30, 2016 at 6:28 pm

2017 is quickly approaching, and for Mayor Bill de Blasio, that would mean having to choose between running for re-election or passing the torch on to someone else. In 2013, de Blasio won the election in a landslide, with nearly 75% of the overall vote and 96% of the Black American vote. Nearly four years later, and the polls may show very different results. In fact, an influential group of Black church leaders is so disappointed with the mayor and some of his economic policies that it’s trying to ensure he doesn’t get a second term. Reverend Dr. Johnnie Green, Pastor of Mount Neboh Baptist Church in Harlem, is the President of Mobilizing Preachers and Communities, the group that is trying to oust de Blasio. Reverend Dr. Green used to fully support the mayor, but he joins us now to discuss why his support has dried up and how he is looking to change things around.

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August 30, 2016 at 6:27 pm

According to a recent study, nearly 64% of Nassau and Suffolk County renters cannot afford a typical two-bedroom apartment on Long Island. Pair that with fair housing law violations such as discrimination of potential renters, and Long Island quickly becomes a difficult place to thrive. What can be done to improve the island’s affordable and fair housing markets? President of Long Island Housing Partnership Peter Elkowitz and Executive Director of Long Island Housing Service Michelle Santantonio discuss that and how to make Long Island a more viable housing market for all in this latest installment of Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America.

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Episode
August 30, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, how was former nursing home Rivington House sold and slated to become luxury condos if there was a deed restriction on the property? That’s what U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara is probing after the De Blasio administration handled the sale of the former nursing home. As we continue our ongoing series, Corruption Watch, former Federal Prosecutor Jennifer Rodgers joins us to discuss just one of the several headaches that the De Blasio administration faces as Bharara investigates City Hall, and the recent court victory that may allow Bharara to pursue the state pensions belonging to disgraced politicians Dean Skelos and Sheldon Silver for unpaid forfeiture from ill-gotten gains.

Next, what was supposed to be Amber Scorah’s first day back at work after the birth of her son would turn out to be something far more tragic. In July of 2015, Amber left her 3 month-old newborn son, Karl, at an unlicensed daycare in SoHo. When she went back to check on him just a few hours later, she made the horrifying discovery that her son had died. It’s a nightmare no parent should ever have to go through, but it was a reality for Amber and now she is fighting to change parental leave laws in the hope that no other parent has to choose between working to provide for their family or being present to care for them. She joins us to discuss how she’s calling on legislators to ensure paid leave for working parents across the country.

Finally, how could a record released more than 35 years ago still be selling out venues like Madison Square Garden? Bruce Springsteen’s “The River Tour” is coming to the iconic New York City arena, but if you’re trying to get tickets, you’ll need nothing short of a miracle. We discuss why the music and its artist is still captivating audiences decades later with Peter Ames Carlin, the author of the New York Times best-seller Bruce, the first biography in 25 years to be written with the musician’s full cooperation.

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August 29, 2016 at 6:29 pm

How was former nursing home Rivington House sold and slated to become luxury condos if there was a deed restriction on the property? That’s what U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara is probing after the De Blasio administration handled the sale of the former nursing home. As we continue our ongoing series, Corruption Watch, former Federal Prosecutor Jennifer Rodgers joins us to discuss just one of the several headaches that the De Blasio administration faces as Bharara investigates City Hall, and the recent court victory that may allow Bharara to pursue the state pensions belonging to disgraced politicians Dean Skelos and Sheldon Silver for unpaid forfeiture from ill-gotten gains.

Continue Reading

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August 29, 2016 at 6:28 pm

What was supposed to be Amber Scorah’s first day back at work after the birth of her son would turn out to be something far more tragic. In July of 2015, Amber left her 3 month-old newborn son, Karl, at an unlicensed daycare in SoHo. When she went back to check on him just a few hours later, she made the horrifying discovery that her son had died. It’s a nightmare no parent should ever have to go through, but it was a reality for Amber and now she is fighting to change parental leave laws in the hope that no other parent has to choose between working to provide for their family or being present to care for them. She joins us to discuss how she’s calling on legislators to ensure paid leave for working parents across the country.

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Episode
August 27, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, the use of excessive force by the police, particularly in relation to Black Americans, has been one of the most pressing local and national issues in recent memory. Now, New York State Assemblyman Michael Blake is making headlines as he files a formal complaint against the New York City Police Department. The Assemblyman claims he was grabbed and forcefully shoved by an officer while trying to defuse a street confrontation at a community event in his district last July. A superior officer intervened, realizing Blake was an elected official, but NYPD Commissioner William Bratton refused to publicly apologize to Blake for the incident. As Commissioner Bratton steps down and passes the torch to James P. O’Neill, Assemblyman Blake joins us to discuss how he’d like to use the transition in a new strategy to improve the relationship between the police and the community.

Next, millions of fish washed up along the shore in Keansburg, New Jersey, which is causing residents to worry about what happened below the surface that could have caused this devastating effect. The community is certainly not benefiting from the fishy situation. Local businesses are usually bustling with end-of-the-summer activities as families try to get in their last chances at fun in the sun before school starts. This year, these beaches look different. Pix-11 News’ Marvin Scott has the story, and he’ll give us the details tonight.

And finally, pizza guru Colin Atrophy Hagendorf tasted more than 400 slices of Manhattan pizza in search of the city’s best pie and recounts his journey in “Slice Harvester: A Memoir In Pizza.” Hagendorf tell us where he found his favorite slice and explains how he discovered it.

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August 26, 2016 at 6:29 pm

The use of excessive force by the police, particularly in relation to Black Americans, has been one of the most pressing local and national issues in recent memory. Now, New York State Assemblyman Michael Blake is making headlines as he files a formal complaint against the New York City Police Department. The Assemblyman claims he was grabbed and forcefully shoved by an officer while trying to defuse a street confrontation at a community event in his district last July. A superior officer intervened, realizing Blake was an elected official, but NYPD Commissioner William Bratton refused to publicly apologize to Blake for the incident. As Commissioner Bratton steps down and passes the torch to James P. O’Neill, Assemblyman Blake joins us to discuss how he’d like to use the transition in a new strategy to improve the relationship between the police and the community.

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August 25, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Late last year, an unusually high number of babies were born in Brazil with abnormally small heads, a condition called microcephaly. The birth defect soon became linked with a mosquito-borne virus called Zika. Since the initial outbreak, the Zika virus has been named a public health emergency by the World Health Organization. But Zika isn’t the first public health emergency in recent memory. In 2014, the world watched in horror as the deadly Ebola virus ripped through West Africa, leaving 10,000 dead. Both viruses are examples of zoonotic diseases, or spillover infections, a term used to define diseases that originate and spread from animals. This is exacerbated by the fact that as our population grows, we are forced to have greater interactions with the wildlife that surrounds us. Veterinarian, epidemiologist, and Associate Vice President of Conservation Medicine at EcoHealth Alliance Dr. Jonathan Epstein joins us to talk about these diseases and his role in a new PBS documentary, Spillover– Zika, Ebola & Beyond.

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August 25, 2016 at 6:28 pm

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then the pictures in this project make up a lifetime story. The New York Times unearthed never before seen images from Black history drawn from old negatives buried in their archives. Once found, editors combed through 5 million photographs and 300,000 negatives to culminate in a project titled “Unpublished Black History.” During Black History Month this year, The New York Times ran pieces of the project with an explanation of their backstories and historical significance. We will speak to two of the editors on the project, New York Times’ photo editor Darcy Eveleigh and reporter Rachel Swarns to learn more about it.

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