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May 13, 2016 at 6:26 pm

In 1981, six gay men and their supporters gathered in playwright, author and LGBT rights activist Larry Kramer’s living room to address what was being called “gay cancer” at the time: AIDS. That meeting would provide the foundation for the first HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy organization now known as Gay Men’s Health Crisis. Anthony Hayes, the organization’s vice president of public affairs and policy, joins us to celebrate their 35th anniversary and to discuss their annual AIDS walk happening this Sunday May 15th in Central Park.

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Episode
May 13, 2016 at 5:30 am

He was once one of the most powerful lawmakers in New York. Now, former Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos is facing the possibility of spending the next decade behind bars. On the heels of former state Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s 12-year prison sentence last month, Skelos and his son Adam will learn their fates in a Manhattan courtroom today. They were convicted last December of charges including bribery, conspiracy and extortion after the elder Skelos used his office to get his son roughly $300,000 worth of consulting work and a no-show job. Tonight, we are breaking down what happens in court, and taking a look at what is next for ethics reform in Albany. Then finally, he replaced Johnny Carson and made a name for himself on The Tonight Show, and now late-night legend Jay Leno joins us in a one-on-one interview to dish about his time on The Tonight Show, the current state of comedy, his car show Jay Leno’s Garage, and the presidential election. You won’t want to miss it.

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May 12, 2016 at 6:28 pm

He was once one of the most powerful lawmakers in New York. Now, former Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos is facing the possibility of spending the next decade behind bars. On the heels of former state Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s 12-year prison sentence last month, Skelos and his son Adam will learn their fates in a Manhattan courtroom today. They were convicted last December of charges including bribery, conspiracy and extortion after the elder Skelos used his office to get his son roughly $300,000 worth of consulting work and a no-show job. Tonight, we are breaking down what happens in court, and taking a look at what is next for ethics reform in Albany.

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Episode
May 11, 2016 at 5:58 am

Statistics are showing that young Americans are dying at rates not seen since the end of the AIDS epidemic. What is the cause of these deaths? It may surprise you: drug overdose. It turns out that since 1999, deaths caused by drug overdoses have multiplied five-times among young, white Americans. The New York Times investigative reporter Sarah Cohen joins us with a look at the data she’s been collecting, and explains the importance of geography in determining who is dying from the disease. Next, dragon, smack, dope. Whatever you may call it, heroin has made a big comeback across the nation, and the consequences are fatal. In New York City alone, over 400 deaths in 2013 were due to the drug, a number that outpaced all other drug overdoses and even the city’s homicide rate. In his new book, Sheer Madness: From Federal Prosecutor to Federal Prisoner, Andrew McKenna details his own struggles with heroin and how he went from convicting criminals to living alongside them. Then finally, in many cases, the shrinking gender gap would be celebrated, but in the case of heroin use, the number of women who are heroin addicts has just about doubled in the last decade. In upstate New York, an Albany-based addiction treatment center called The Next Step has seen this growing trend first-hand, and is working to help recovering heroin addicts find their next step in life away from the drug. A group of women at the facility share their story with us about what their lives were like on heroin and the everyday struggle it takes for them to stay clean.

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May 10, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Dragon, smack, dope. Whatever you may call it, heroin has made a big comeback across the nation, and the consequences are fatal. In New York City alone, over 400 deaths in 2013 were due to the drug, a number that outpaced all other drug overdoses and even the city’s homicide rate. In his new book, Sheer Madness: From Federal Prosecutor to Federal Prisoner, Andrew McKenna details his own struggles with heroin and how he went from convicting criminals to living alongside them.

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Clip
May 10, 2016 at 6:26 pm

In many cases, the shrinking gender gap would be celebrated, but in the case of heroin use, the number of women who are heroin addicts has just about doubled in the last decade. In upstate New York, an Albany-based addiction treatment center called The Next Step has seen this growing trend first-hand, and is working to help recovering heroin addicts find their next step in life away from the drug. A group of women at the facility share their story with us about what their lives were like on heroin and the everyday struggle it takes for them to stay clean.

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Episode
May 10, 2016 at 5:48 am

Kurt Eichenwald, a senior writer for Newsweek, stops by to explain his article “American Democracy Was Broken Before Trump.” How does he view the quality of American democracy and the 2016 Presidential election? We’ll find out tonight. There was outrage and anger in Brooklyn last month when many New Yorkers showed up to the polls for the April 19 primaries and found out they couldn’t vote. Officials say over 125,000 voters were mysteriously removed from the rolls, leading New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer to launch an audit of the city’s Board of Elections. He joins us tonight with the latest on his investigation. Then next, guns and Christianity. For some in America, the two are inextricably linked. Yet is it possible to be pro-gun and pro-life? In her new documentary, The Armor of Light, filmmaker Abigail Disney follows the story of a reverend as he struggles to piece together how guns should fit into his ministry, and how they already do. She joins us to discuss the relationship between the church and guns, and how this documentary challenges those ideas. Finally, survival in the animal kingdom may just depend on making friends. Many animals, from the largest to the smallest, often bond with the most unexpected collaborators to succeed in the wild. Executive Producer of PBS Nature, Fred Kaufman, stops by to discuss the new film Nature’s Perfect Partners, which premieres on May 11th and follows the bond between some of the most unexpected pairs in the animal kingdom.

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May 09, 2016 at 6:28 pm

There was outrage and anger in Brooklyn last month when many New Yorkers showed up to the polls for the April 19 primaries and found out they couldn’t vote. Officials say over 125,000 voters were mysteriously removed from the rolls, leading New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer to launch an audit of the city’s Board of Elections. He joins us tonight with the latest on his investigation.

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