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September 28, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Another day, another corruption charge in Albany. First Sheldon Silver, then Dean Skelos. Now, the latest corruption case finds two former aides of Governor Cuomo charged by the U.S. Attorney’s office, along with a senior state official and others in connection to the governor’s signature upstate economic development program dubbed “Buffalo Billion.” This, of course, not only raises major questions about how the governor’s programs were managed, but also how the governor has handled corruption in the capitol, something he vowed to clean up when he took office. Albany Bureau Chief for Politico, Jimmy Vielkind sheds light on the current political climate in Albany and what it means for the governor and his administration.

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September 28, 2016 at 6:26 pm

The fight over gentrification and affordable housing in New York City is all too real for some New Yorkers. Last week, we introduced you to one of them, Raymond Tirado, who refuses to move out of his East Harlem apartment. He has turned down several buyout offers from his landlord, and is now the subject of the documentary “Last Tenant Standing in East Harlem.” Tonight we’re bringing you the other side of this story. Yi Han, the co-owner of Tirado’s building, has plans to redevelop the property and feels her project will make the Manhattan neighborhood more accessible to the middle class. She joins us with her response to the film and to tell us what challenges developers are facing as they try to build in the city.

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Episode
September 28, 2016 at 5:29 am

Tonight, as the reviews roll in on both candidates from last night’s presidential debate, many believe Hillary Clinton walked away with a clear win. Among Hillary supporters, the verdict is that Trump seemed ill-prepared next to the calm, collected Clinton. Meanwhile, former New York mayor turned Trump advisor, Rudy Giuliani, placed the blame for Trump’s shortcomings on the moderator, Lester Holt. And still, some are calling the whole thing a draw between the Democratic and GOP candidate. Tonight, political analyst for Rasmussen Reports Amy Holmes and former Newsday columnist Ellis Henican join us to break down last night’s debate, give you the highlights, and offer some insights of their own.
Next, yesterday’s presidential debate promised to be a showdown for the ages and to a large extent, it delivered, with the candidates more or less laying out their respective cases amid numerous interruptions and the occasional name-calling. But what did audiences take away from the debate? ABC News correspondent and Intelligence Squared U.S. moderator John Donvan shares results from a debate viewing party hosted by Intelligence Squared and looks at whether last night’s event was any indicator that a new format is needed for future presidential debates.
Then finally, as the news crews pack up to go home and Hofstra University attempts to resume some semblance of normal college life, we hear once again from the students themselves. It seems to be the consensus among the youth at Hofstra that though excitement and Hofstra pride is still high, students are disappointed that the candidates failed to address the issues that affect them, most importantly student debt. Tonight, students and journalists for Hofstra’s Debate TV, Michael Fuller and Megan McGuire follow up with more about the energy on campus and what their peers are taking away from the experience.

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September 27, 2016 at 6:29 pm

As the reviews roll in on both candidates from last night’s presidential debate, many believe Hillary Clinton walked away with a clear win. Among Hillary supporters, the verdict is that Trump seemed ill-prepared next to the calm, collected Clinton. Meanwhile, former New York mayor turned Trump advisor, Rudy Giuliani, placed the blame for Trump’s shortcomings on the moderator, Lester Holt. And still, some are calling the whole thing a draw between the Democratic and GOP candidate. Tonight, political analyst for Rasmussen Reports Amy Holmes and former Newsday columnist Ellis Henican join us to break down last night’s debate, give you the highlights, and offer some insights of their own.

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Clip
September 27, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Yesterday’s presidential debate promised to be a showdown for the ages and to a large extent, it delivered, with the candidates more or less laying out their respective cases amid numerous interruptions and the occasional name-calling. But what did audiences take away from the debate? ABC News correspondent and Intelligence Squared U.S. moderator John Donvan shares results from a debate viewing party hosted by Intelligence Squared and looks at whether last night’s event was any indicator that a new format is needed for future presidential debates.

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Clip
September 27, 2016 at 6:27 pm

As the news crews pack up to go home and Hofstra University attempts to resume some semblance of normal college life, we hear once again from the students themselves. It seems to be the consensus among the youth at Hofstra that though excitement and Hofstra pride is still high, students are disappointed that the candidates failed to address the issues that affect them, most importantly student debt. Tonight, students and journalists for Hofstra’s Debate TV, Michael Fuller and Megan McGuire follow up with more about the energy on campus and what their peers are taking away from the experience.

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Episode
September 27, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight is a political television event months in the making. Anticipated to have more viewers around the nation than the Super Bowl, the first presidential debate at Hofstra University is supposed to pull an audience of approximately 100 million people. But with 40 days to go before Election Day, numbers, polls, and ratings are becoming more important than ever. Polls have been crunching numbers non-stop. Currently, Bloomberg.com says it’s a dead heat with a 46 percent tie between the candidates and Nate Silver at 538.com predicts 51.5 percent for Clinton and 48.5 percent for Trump. While the gap closes between the candidates, things are sure to be different by this time tomorrow, and we will have the latest tomorrow night with an in-depth analysis of what’s to come.

Then finally, in 1967, a new show aired on a local station in Dayton, Ohio, that audiences had never seen. The Phil Donahue Show put thought-provoking topics, controversial guests, and the audience together for the first time to create conversations not previously seen on television. The show ran for 29 years and defined the genre of daytime talk TV forever, paving the way for talk show sensations from Oprah Winfrey to Ellen DeGeneres. At the helm of this trail-blazing talk show is Phil Donahue himself, someone who has never been shy to discuss anything from politics, to the media, to Washington, and anything in between. This pioneer of daytime talk joins us tonight to discuss the highs and lows of his career.

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September 26, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Tonight is a political television event months in the making. Anticipated to have more viewers around the nation than the Super Bowl, the first presidential debate at Hofstra University is supposed to pull an audience of approximately 100 million people. But with 40 days to go before Election Day, numbers, polls, and ratings are becoming more important than ever. Polls have been crunching numbers non-stop. Currently, Bloomberg.com says it’s a dead heat with a 46 percent tie between the candidates and Nate Silver at 538.com predicts 51.5 percent for Clinton and 48.5 percent for Trump. While the gap closes between the candidates, things are sure to be different by this time tomorrow, and we will have the latest tomorrow night with an in-depth analysis of what’s to come.

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Episode
September 24, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, Monday’s presidential debate has all the makings of something we’ve never seen before in modern politics. But beyond the expected hyperbolic verbal-sparring, will there be anything of substance that American voters will get out of the showdown? Intelligence Squared U.S., a nonpartisan organization whose goal is to raise the level of public discourse in the United States, wants to make sure there is. The organization has planned a handful of their own debates, including a viewing party at Lincoln Center following the first presidential debate that will have the audience analyze the showdown and discuss the way we debate in the U.S. ABC News correspondent and Intelligence Squared moderator John Donvan joins us once again with his take on what debates should look like versus what we may see this Monday.

Next, as November quickly approaches, the race for the White House is heating up. As the gap between the candidates narrows, the focus has fallen on obtaining the millennial vote, which is sure to be a priority as they prepare for the first debate at Hofstra. What can we expect from this coming debate and what do Trump and Clinton need to do to appeal to younger voters? We talk directly to the students at Hofstra University for the answers. Host of Hofstra University’s Debate TV Michael Fuller and production student for the show Megan McGuire join us to give us a preview of what’s to come as the nation waits in anticipation for their school to take the national stage next week.

Then finally, this Sunday, some of music’s biggest names will come together here in New York City for “The Concert Across America to End Gun Violence.” Artists such as Jackson Browne, Eddie Vedder, and Marc Cohn will perform at the Beacon Theatre and at 350 other venues across the United States in remembrance of victims of gun violence and to raise awareness for sensible gun laws during this election season. Among those lending their voice to the cause and concert is singer, songwriter, author, and daughter of the late Johnny Cash, Rosanne Cash. She joins us tonight to talk about the concert, its cause, and how she hopes to make a change.

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MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, Ellen and James S. Marcus, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross.

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