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August 04, 2016 at 6:29 pm

On Tuesday, NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton announced that he will be stepping down from his post next month. We listened in on his press conference where he thanked those who supported him through his 45 year-long career in the public eye. But what lies in store for the New York Police Department after Bratton takes his leave? Journalist Ellis Henican joins us to discuss what’s next for the Big Apple.

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Episode
August 03, 2016 at 5:23 am

Tonight, William J. Bratton has announced today that he will be stepping down from his position as commissioner of the New York Police Department next month. After a 45 year-long career that spanned the country, Bratton will take a job within the private sector. Top uniformed officer Chief James O’Neill will fill Bratton’s role after he leaves. We Listen In as Bratton spoke earlier today about his departure in a press conference.

Next, Brian Lehrer’s radio show on WNYC has covered politics, culture, and life in our region for over 25 years. During that time, Lehrer has interviewed both news-makers and regular listeners alike and created a unique community within New York media. Tonight, we go behind the scenes to take a look at how the show came together during last month’s presidential conventions.

Then, Koko the Gorilla isn’t your average ape. This 45-year-old primate was taught sign language as a youngster by an animal psychologist who has gone on to become her surrogate mother. For decades, Koko has received worldwide recognition for her ability to communicate with humans. But some in the scientific community are skeptical about her true ability to understand and respond to what people are saying. A new documentary, Koko: The Gorilla Who Talks, from PBS and the BBC explores this remarkable animal’s life and the controversy surrounding her. Tonight we take a look at the film and sit down with the documentary’s producer to go inside Koko’s story.

Finally, as part of our ongoing series, Listening In, Nathan Lane opens up about fame and coming out as gay during a conversation with comedian Joy Behar at the 92nd Street Y. Lane, perhaps best known for his stage and film portrayals of Max Bialystock in The Producers, is not only a Broadway and television star, but also an LGBT activist and proud member of the gay community.

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August 02, 2016 at 6:29 pm

William J. Bratton has announced today that he will be stepping down from his position as commissioner of the New York Police Department next month. After a 45 year-long career that spanned the country, Bratton will take a job within the private sector. Top uniformed officer Chief James O’Neill will fill Bratton’s role after he leaves. We Listen In as Bratton spoke earlier today about his departure in a press conference.

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Clip
August 02, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Brian Lehrer’s radio show on WNYC has covered politics, culture, and life in our region for over 25 years. During that time, Lehrer has interviewed both news-makers and regular listeners alike and created a unique community within New York media. Tonight, we go behind the scenes to take a look at how the show came together during last month’s presidential conventions.

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Episode
August 02, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, the year was 1968, and our nation was divided by political parties and heated ideological clashes. An unforgettable election season, one filled with triumphs and tragedies. It was marred by violence and assassinations, Vietnam, and a culture clash between the old and young… It was a year that forever changed this country. Then rose a politician who was unafraid to speak his mind, a politician who appealed to the alienated working white voter who was convinced the government had abandoned him. That politician… was George Wallace, but does he remind you of someone else who is currently running for President? Is history repeating itself in the form of Donald Trump? Boston Globe columnist and author Michael Cohen joins us to discuss his latest book, American Maelstrom, which documents the 1968 election and the politics of division. We discuss the 1968 election, how George Wallace and Donald Trump compare, and the significance of both the election of 1968 and 2016.

Next, Claressa Shields, also known as T-Rex, made history at 17 years old. In 2012, she was the first U.S. woman to take home the gold for boxing at the London Olympics. But Claressa’s story wasn’t always gold medals and historic wins; instead it’s an inspiring tale of how with hard work, determination, and perseverance anyone can overcome hardship and struggle. Zackary Canepari is one of the directors for a documentary showcasing the young Olympian, T-Rex: Her Fight for Gold. He stops by to tell us how Claressa Shields became the subject of his film and shares the road they took to follow her journey to Olympic success.

Then, the year was 1936. America was in the midst of the Great Depression. The world was turning its eyes to Berlin for the Olympics and the nation was struggling. Nine working-class young men from the University of Washington were given the opportunity to represent the country in rowing, beating out not only their prestigious Ivy League counterparts here at home, but going on to take the gold medal against Adolf Hitler’s elite German rowers. Hear their story in the new American Experience PBS documentary called The Boys of ’36 premiering tomorrow, August 2.

Finally, have you ever met a 94 year old style maven? Born and bred New Yorker Iris Apfel is known for her oversized glasses and original sense of style. She is the subject of a new documentary titled Iris, directed by the late Albert Maysles. His daughter and producer of the film, Rebekah Maysles, joins us to talk about the film, it’s subject, and her father. Iris will have its broadcast premiere on the POV series tonight on PBS at 10 p.m.

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Clip
August 01, 2016 at 6:29 pm

The year was 1968, and our nation was divided by political parties and heated ideological clashes. An unforgettable election season, one filled with triumphs and tragedies. It was marred by violence and assassinations, Vietnam, and a culture clash between the old and young… It was a year that forever changed this country. Then rose a politician who was unafraid to speak his mind, a politician who appealed to the alienated working white voter who was convinced the government had abandoned him. That politician… was George Wallace, but does he remind you of someone else who is currently running for President? Is history repeating itself in the form of Donald Trump? Boston Globe columnist and author Michael Cohen joins us to discuss his latest book, American Maelstrom, which documents the 1968 election and the politics of division. We discuss the 1968 election, how George Wallace and Donald Trump compare, and the significance of both the election of 1968 and 2016.

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Episode
July 30, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, the right to vote is a large part of American democracy, but what makes a voter choose a candidate when they go to the polls? Filmmakers Sarah Klein and Tom Mason set out to create a documentary with the mission to discover just that. They join us to discuss their film How to Win an Election and to share their surprising conclusion that the issues discussed in debates and campaigns might not matter to voters as much as you’d think.

Next, is the drinking water safe in New Jersey? After the water crisis in Flint, the quality of water has been questioned in many areas throughout the country. Lead-contaminated water was found in many Newark public schools, heightening the concern of people in the region. New Jersey Capitol Report co-anchor and MetroFocus contributor Steve Adubato is here to break down the larger problems surrounding New Jersey water.

Then finally, in just a week, Rio de Janeiro will be awash with athletes, media, and tourists as the world tunes in for the Olympic Games. In 2009, the International Olympic Committee crowned the city as the host of the 2016 Olympics and the reaction was joyous. But despite the celebrations that took place seven years ago, Rio has faced many struggles including an economic downturn, political scandal, corruption, and organized crime. What legacy will this city leave on the Olympics this year? Award-winning journalist and Associated Press Correspondant in Rio de Janiero, Juliana Barbassa witnessed it all. She chronicles it in Dancing with the Devil in the City of God and she joins us to talk about the roadblocks this Olympic host has run into leading up to the games.

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Clip
July 29, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Is the drinking water safe in New Jersey? After the water crisis in Flint, the quality of water has been questioned in many areas throughout the country. Lead-contaminated water was found in many Newark public schools, heightening the concern of people in the region. New Jersey Capitol Report co-anchor and MetroFocus contributor Steve Adubato is here to break down the larger problems surrounding New Jersey water.

Continue Reading

Clip
July 29, 2016 at 6:28 pm

In just a week, Rio de Janeiro will be awash with athletes, media, and tourists as the world tunes in for the Olympic Games. In 2009, the International Olympic Committee crowned the city as the host of the 2016 Olympics and the reaction was joyous. But despite the celebrations that took place seven years ago, Rio has faced many struggles including an economic downturn, political scandal, corruption, and organized crime. What legacy will this city leave on the Olympics this year? Award-winning journalist and Associated Press Correspondant in Rio de Janiero, Juliana Barbassa witnessed it all. She chronicles it in Dancing with the Devil in the City of God and she joins us to talk about the roadblocks this Olympic host has run into leading up to the games.

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Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, Ellen and James S. Marcus, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross.

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