Episode
June 03, 2016 at 6:41 am

Tonight, New York City food pantries have been running dry and that’s on top of Mayor DeBlasio proposing further funding cuts in his preliminary fiscal budget. Now, the organization Food Bank For New York City is asking the mayor to up funding from $8.2 million to $22 million in order to support the emergency food assistance program. The Vice President for Research and Public Affairs for this organization, Triada Stampas, sits down with us to explain the strain budget cuts have put on the city’s food banks and pantries and how they are working with the Mayor and city council to rectify the issue. We’re also joined by 69-year-old Myriam Rias. She’s worked her entire life but is still dependent on these pantries to feed her family. She offers us her thoughts on the impact further cuts will have on her livelihood and health. Next, he made millions building and selling tech companies and now he’s a star investor, swimming with the sharks on ABC’s hit show Shark Tank. Robert Herjavec, in his new book You Don’t Have to Be A Shark: Creating Your Own Success, draws from his life experiences to share tips on how you too can strike it rich using the skills you didn’t know you had. Then finally, you may know her as Thelma Harper in the hit ’80’s sitcom Mama’s Family but she’s also an alum of The Carol Burnett Show. Tonight, Vicki Lawrence is here reminiscing about some classic moments from The Carol Burnett Show ahead of the upcoming PBS special Carol Burnett’s Favorite Sketches where comedy legend Carol Burnett walks us through the stories behind some of her favorite scenes.

Continue Reading

Clip
June 02, 2016 at 8:12 pm

New York City food pantries have been running dry and that’s on top of Mayor DeBlasio proposing further funding cuts in his preliminary fiscal budget. Now, the organization Food Bank For New York City is asking the mayor to up funding from $8.2 million to $22 million in order to support the emergency food assistance program. The Vice President for Research and Public Affairs for this organization, Triada Stampas, sits down with us to explain the strain budget cuts have put on the city’s food banks and pantries and how they are working with the Mayor and city council to rectify the issue. We’re also joined by 69-year-old Myriam Rias. She’s worked her entire life but is still dependent on these pantries to feed her family. She offers us her thoughts on the impact further cuts will have on her livelihood and health.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 31, 2016 at 10:41 am

For Memorial Day, in honor of the men and women who gave their lives serving our country in the armed forces, we follow Toba Potosky, president of the Cadman Park Conservancy, on his mission to re-open and restore the Brooklyn World War II memorial erected by New York City Parks Commissioner Robert Moses in 1951. And, on his third and […]

Continue Reading

Episode
May 27, 2016 at 5:58 am

The battlefield is not the last place where our troops face combat. For many veterans who return from the trials of war, they can be locked in an ongoing struggle with their own minds that can lead to drugs or suicide just to quell their suffering. The new POV documentary Of Men and War, which premieres May 30 at 10pm on PBS, follows the grueling journey of returning soldiers and their families at The Pathway Home in California, where they are set on their own path to recovering from PTSD and the emotional pain of their memories. Next, the public four-year high school graduation rate for New York City students has recently hit a high of 70 percent, and although that number may not sound like much, it is 2 percentage points higher than the previous year. As part of our ongoing initiative, Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America, we spotlight one Harlem school who has proved that the average is not the norm. At the St. Aloysius School in Harlem, students go on to graduate from high school at a rate of 96 percent. But that success may soon be cut short because the school, which has been a fixture in the community for 76 years, will be forced to close its doors for good. If St. Aloysius cannot reach its fundraising goals by next month, the community will lose this Harlem beacon of hope forever. Then finally, they were called the Mount Rushmore of country music. In 1985, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson formed the greatest country-western music super group of all time: The Highwaymen. Their legendary story is the subject of the new American Masters documentary The Highwaymen: Friends Till the End which premieres May 27 at 9pm on PBS. Country music artist Jessi Colter, who was married to Waylon Jennings, shines light on the lasting impact of the iconic quartet.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 26, 2016 at 6:28 pm

The battlefield is not the last place where our troops face combat. For many veterans who return from the trials of war, they can be locked in an ongoing struggle with their own minds that can lead to drugs or suicide just to quell their suffering. The new POV documentary Of Men and War, which premieres May 30 at 10pm on PBS, follows the grueling journey of returning soldiers and their families at The Pathway Home in California, where they are set on their own path to recovering from PTSD and the emotional pain of their memories.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 25, 2016 at 5:59 am

Trailer parks. Beyond the stigma and the stereotypes, for families who can’t afford a traditional home, they can be a lifeline worth fighting for. That’s why neighbors from a Long Island trailer park in Nassau County recently banded together to stave off eviction and save their homes. Their struggle is the subject of a Newsday documentary, The Last Trailer Park. Tonight, as part of our ongoing initiative, “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” we take a look at the film and speak with its producer. Then tonight, we also delve into an epidemic impacting thousands of Americans across the Tri-State every year: eviction. Harvard University professor Matthew Desmond gives us a firsthand look at the harsh realities of living in a trailer park. The sociologist made one his home for about half a year and watched as families were evicted and forced into shelters. Desmond took thousands of pages of notes as he chronicled their stories. That research has been called “the most comprehensive, detailed data on American urban poverty, housing and eviction” and is now the foundation of his book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 24, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Trailer parks. Beyond the stigma and the stereotypes, for families who can’t afford a traditional home, they can be a lifeline worth fighting for. That’s why neighbors from a Long Island trailer park in Nassau County recently banded together to stave off eviction and save their homes. Their struggle is the subject of a Newsday documentary, The Last Trailer Park. Tonight, as part of our ongoing initiative, “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” we take a look at the film and speak with its producer.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 24, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Tonight, we also delve into an epidemic impacting thousands of Americans across the Tri-State every year: eviction. Harvard University professor Matthew Desmond gives us a firsthand look at the harsh realities of living in a trailer park. The sociologist made one his home for about half a year and watched as families were evicted and forced into shelters. Desmond took thousands of pages of notes as he chronicled their stories. That research has been called “the most comprehensive, detailed data on American urban poverty, housing and eviction” and is now the foundation of his book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 24, 2016 at 5:48 am

Sex, lies and social media come together on the big screen in the documentary Weiner, which follows former congressman Anthony Weiner after his highly publicized sexting scandal as he made a bid to rehabilitate his image and become mayor of New York City in 2013. The film paints a candid portrait of the politician and his fall from grace, shot by his former staffer turned filmmaker. We have a preview of what is being hailed as one of the best documentaries about a political campaign ever. Then, for director Jason Moore, the world of theater exists both on stage and in Tinseltown. Then a young director, he took a small off-Broadway hit and brought it to Broadway. That show? The 2004 Tony Award-winner Avenue Q. Jason then made his transition to Hollywood directing a little feature film you may have heard of called Pitch Perfect. But now he’s back on the Great White Way helming the comedy Fully Committed with Modern Family star Jesse Tyler Ferguson. Moore joins us to discuss Fully Committed and why he loves directing in New York City and Hollywood.

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

WNET

© 2016 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019