Clip
September 23, 2016 at 6:27 pm

This Sunday, some of music’s biggest names will come together here in New York City for “The Concert Across America to End Gun Violence.” Artists such as Jackson Browne, Eddie Vedder, and Marc Cohn will perform at the Beacon Theatre and at 350 other venues across the United States in remembrance of victims of gun violence and to raise awareness for sensible gun laws during this election season. Among those lending their voice to the cause and concert is singer, songwriter, author, and daughter of the late Johnny Cash, Rosanne Cash. She joins us tonight to talk about the concert, its cause, and how she hopes to make a change.

Continue Reading

Episode
September 23, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, bad behavior in Albany is making headlines once again after two former aides to Governor Cuomo along with other members of his inner circle were charged with corruption. Joseph Percoco and Todd Howe are named as part of a 79-page criminal complaint unsealed this morning in federal court. The charges include counts of bribery, corruption, and fraud involving the governor’s upstate economic development programs. And it’s T-minus 4 days until the first presidential debate at Hofstra University. Anticipation is building as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump prepare to duke it out at the Long Island college during an event that could shatter the record for the most watched debate ever. (That title has been held since 1980 by Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.) Here to share their perspectives on all this is Amy Holmes, a political analyst for the polling company Rasmussen Reports, and former Newsday columnist Ellis Henican.

Next, today, busy schedules keep many of us on a diet of fast foods and on-the-go meals, but what do we compromise by eating like this all the time? Do we really know how the food we eat gets to the table? The Slow Food movement encourages people to eat local, sustainable, and seasonally grown foods. MetroFocus’ Andrea Vasquez takes us to the eastern end of Long Island to meet some Slow Food supporters and see how they’re taking the guesswork out of the recipe.

Finally, it was a sitcom that started off in 1989 as a self-proclaimed show about nothing. Fast forward nine years and many successful seasons later, and Seinfeld aired its final episode to an audience of more than 76 million viewers. In 2016, it still remains as a recognizable facet of American culture, with fan-favorite episodes and relevant quotes that are still a part of our mainstream lives. A new book Seinfeldia celebrates creators Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld, bringing fans behind the scenes of the show that became an American television phenomenon. T.V. historian, entertainment writer, and author of Seinfeldia, Jennifer Keishin Armstrong joins us to discuss how this show went from humble, comedic beginnings to a television series with a lasting impact.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 22, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Bad behavior in Albany is making headlines once again after two former aides to Governor Cuomo along with other members of his inner circle were charged with corruption. Joseph Percoco and Todd Howe are named as part of a 79-page criminal complaint unsealed this morning in federal court. The charges include counts of bribery, corruption, and fraud involving the governor’s upstate economic development programs. And it’s T-minus 4 days until the first presidential debate at Hofstra University. Anticipation is building as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump prepare to duke it out at the Long Island college during an event that could shatter the record for the most watched debate ever. (That title has been held since 1980 by Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.) Here to share their perspectives on all this is Amy Holmes, a political analyst for the polling company Rasmussen Reports, and former Newsday columnist Ellis Henican.

Continue Reading

Episode
September 22, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, New Yorkers are always on the move, but one man in East Harlem refuses to move out of his apartment. Raymond Tirado is just one man out of the countless people who are worried about being pushed out of their neighborhood as New York City’s next gentrification project heats up. But while Mayor De Blasio has pledged to preserve and build affordable housing to ensure low-income residents of the area aren’t priced out, Raymond Tirado is digging in his heels and fighting to stay in the home he grew up in. Tirado, the subject of a documentary Last Tenant Standing in East Harlem, joins us with the film’s director, Andrew Padilla, to discuss the issue and how these projects affect other native New Yorkers.

Next, basketball legend and NBA star Shaquille O’Neal retired from the game after 19 seasons, but his name is still greatly revered in the world of basketball. The 7′ 1″ New Jersey native attributes his success on and off the court to the support and values instilled in him while he was young. Recently, he returned to his hometown of Newark to give back to the Boys and Girls Club on Avon Avenue where his story started. NJTV’s Michael Hill caught up with O’Neal at the Boys and Girls Club and asked him what it meant to him to have a place to go to when he was a kid and how he’s giving back. And don’t forget to log on to MetroFocus.org tonight to see the extended interview!

Then finally, young musicians came together from East End Arts Student Orchestra and The Perlman Music Program to harmonize in their fifth annual joint performance on eastern Long Island. East End Arts is an art education nonprofit based in Riverhead, and The Perlman Music Program is a training and mentorship program on Shelter Island founded by Toby Perlman, wife of violin viruoso Itzhak Perlman. Each group runs summer programs for young musicians from nearby and abroad. MetroFocus’ Andrea Vasquez was there as these classical musicians performed, and she gives us a behind-the-scenes look at the powerful music they create together.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 21, 2016 at 6:29 pm

New Yorkers are always on the move, but one man in East Harlem refuses to move out of his apartment. Raymond Tirado is just one man out of the countless people who are worried about being pushed out of their neighborhood as New York City’s next gentrification project heats up. But while Mayor De Blasio has pledged to preserve and build affordable housing to ensure low-income residents of the area aren’t priced out, Raymond Tirado is digging in his heels and fighting to stay in the home he grew up in. Tirado, the subject of a documentary Last Tenant Standing in East Harlem, joins us with the film’s director, Andrew Padilla, to discuss the issue and how these projects affect other native New Yorkers.

Continue Reading

Episode
September 21, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, who is the Chelsea bomber and did he have help? Yesterday, we followed reports of a shootout between police and Ahmad Khan Rahami, the suspect taken into custody for the New York and New Jersey bombings that hit both states this past weekend. And although they are scenes of what some are speculating to be acts of terror, New Yorkers remain calm and unfazed. Tonight, we look at new details that have surfaced about Rahami and his family, and how the attacks are making their mark on the election ahead of next week’s first presidential debate.

Next, after four years, $65 billion dollars in damage, and countless relief efforts, the region is still rebuilding the damage Superstorm Sandy left behind in its wake. Families and homeowners are still struggling to piece their lives back together, even after billions of dollars in relief money has been raised. So where did the money go? A new FRONTLINE documentary “Business of Disaster” follows the money trail and reveals who made a small fortune off of others misfortune. Correspondent Laura Sullivan, joins us to discuss the film and who makes their living off of disasters like Sandy.

Next, Wyandanch in the town of Babylon has earned a reputation for being one of the poorest communities on Long Island. Surrounded by some of the most well-to-do areas in the United States, this working class hamlet has struggled with poverty and crime. But that’s all changing. Wyandanch is currently is the middle of a $500 million redevelopment plan, which calls for affordable housing, commercial businesses, infrastructure and transportation improvements. In our continuing series, Chasing the Dream, Long Island Business Report anchor Jim Paymar takes us to this little corner of Suffolk County to tell us what the plan could mean for other struggling communities across our area and across the country.

Finally, back in 1939, Waitstill and Martha Sharp left their children behind in Massachusetts to rescue refugees and dissidents from the Nazis. Over the course of two years, the Sharps would save more than 130 people from the horrors of the Holocaust. Despite their heroics, the Sharps’ story remained largely untold for decades. Now it is coming to light as part of a documentary co-directed by their grandson and the filmmaker Ken Burns. Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War makes its PBS premiere tonight at 9 p.m. on THIRTEEN. Ahead of its debut, we sit down with Artemis Joukowsky, the Sharps’ grandson, to talk more about the film and his grandparents.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 20, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Who is the Chelsea bomber and did he have help? Yesterday, we followed reports of a shootout between police and Ahmad Kahn Rahami, the suspect taken into custody for the New York and New Jersey bombings that hit both states this past weekend. And although they are scenes of what some are speculating to be acts of terror, New Yorkers remain calm and unfazed. Tonight, we look at new details that have surfaced about Rahami and his family, and how the attacks are making their mark on the election ahead of next week’s first presidential debate.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 20, 2016 at 6:28 pm

After four years, $65 billion dollars in damage, and countless relief efforts, the region is still rebuilding the damage Superstorm Sandy left behind in its wake. Families and homeowners are still struggling to piece their lives back together, even after billions of dollars in relief money has been raised. So where did the money go? A new FRONTLINE documentary “Business of Disaster” follows the money trail and reveals who made a small fortune off of others misfortune. Correspondent Laura Sullivan, joins us to discuss the film and who makes their living off of disasters like Sandy.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 20, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Wyandanch in the town of Babylon has earned a reputation for being one of the poorest communities on Long Island. Surrounded by some of the most well-to-do areas in the United States, this working class hamlet has struggled with poverty and crime. But that’s all changing. Wyandanch is currently is the middle of a $500 million redevelopment plan, which calls for affordable housing, commercial businesses, infrastructure and transportation improvements. In our continuing series, Chasing the Dream, Long Island Business Report anchor Jim Paymar takes us to this little corner of Suffolk County to tell us what the plan could mean for other struggling communities across our area and across the country.

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

WNET

© 2016 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019