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July 27, 2016 at 6:27 pm

The AIDS epidemic still ravages America, and now your kids may be at risk. While a cure is still yet to be found, confidential, affordable treatment and preventative medicine such as PrEP is accessible to adults in need. But according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2013 less than 50 percent of New Yorkers ages 13 to 24 took medications that reduced their HIV to very low levels. Governor Andrew Cuomo is now aiming to end new HIV infections in New York by 2020 by proposing legislature giving minors a right to confidential access to HIV prevention and care. Executive Director of the Ryan/Chelsea-Clinton Community Health Center, William Murphy, joins us to talk about the current state of this virus in New York and advancements in prevention such as Pre-Exposure Prophylasxis, or PrEP

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July 27, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Tonight, we’ll take you to a treasured urban oasis in the northern part of New York City: The New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx. A national landmark, this botanical garden covers 250 acres with beautiful landscapes, is internationally renowned for plant research, education and conservation, and caps off with its classic and iconic conservatory building. To celebrate the 125th anniversary of this New York gem, a newly revised book titled The New York Botanical Garden documents this iconic garden as the unparalleled epitome of New York City’s beauty.

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Episode
July 26, 2016 at 5:39 am

Tonight, with the Republican convention in the rear view, Democrats are now gathering in Philadelphia to begin their own convention and anoint Hillary Clinton for President. But while the anticipation is building, party leader Debbie Wasserman Schultz was met with heckling and disruption as she gave a speech this morning. She will be stepping down as soon as the convention wraps, amid pressure from the WikiLeaks emails release, one of which show staffers discussing how to weaken Sanders’ support by referencing his faith, as well as Hillary’s campaign saying the Russian government may have orchestrated the debacle. Is this an omen for what is to come, or will the Democratic party pull it together? How will Bernie Sanders react when he takes the stage tonight? We speak to New Jersey Assemblyman John Wisniewski, who was the chair of Bernie Sanders’ campaign in that state, about the tumultuous first day of the Democratic convention.

Next, America has the largest prison population in the world, and in New York City, 4000 people are locked up in jail, although they haven’t been convicted of any crime. They remain there, awaiting trial, not because their crime demands it, but because they simply cannot afford to pay their bail. In a new documentary titled Limbo, three prisoners tell their story and the high price they are forced to pay as a result of our country’s bail system. Filmmaker Razan Ghalayini and senior planner at Vera Institute of Justice’s Center on Sentencing and Corrections Insha Rahman join us to talk about the broken criminal justice system in America and whether it discriminates against the poor while costing us $9 billion a year.

Then finally, who said STEM skills were best learned in a classroom? Mohonk Preserve is breaking the status quo for STEM kids and taking their lessons outside, using the natural environment to reinforce science, math, technology and engineering programs. MetroFocus’ Jenna Flanagan takes us to the preserve and shows you how the program is taking kids from areas like Kingston, Poughkeepsie and Newburgh, making them comfortable with the outdoors, and melding it with their interests in STEM.

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Episode
July 12, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, the events of last week concerning the police shooting in Dallas and the deaths of 37 year old Alton Sterling in Louisiana, and 32 year old Philando Castile in Minnesota still affects the nation as it mourns and struggles with what comes next. Sterling died after being pinned down and fatally shot by police officers, and nearly 24 hours later, Castile was shot during a traffic stop and passed away shortly after. In response to the loss of those lives, protests erupted across the country, including Dallas, Texas, where a march for peace turned deadly when 25 year old army reserve veteran Micah Johnson gunned down and killed five police officers and injured more. Johnson was taken out by law enforcement shortly after, and bomb-making material was confirmed to have been found in his house over the weekend. Tonight, we have Manhattan Institute Fellow and author of War on Cops: How the New Attack on Law and Order Makes Everyone Less Safe Heather MacDonald and NYPD veteran Darrin Porcher to put these events in perspective. Finally, sometimes, it’s good to get out into nature and get some fresh air, and that’s what Emmy award-winning journalist Michael Schneider is encouraging people to do with a new series on NJTV. On the Trail with Mike Schneider will guide viewers through the flora and fauna of America’s most iconic and breathtaking scenery. Schneider joins us to talk about this new series and how it’s looking to leave an impact. The first premieres and brings the great outdoors to your home on Wednesday, July 13 at 8 p.m. on NJTV.

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Episode
July 02, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, every weekday over 200,000 people use the “L” train to shuttle between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and now, talks of a shutdown could mean that all of them would need to find another way to get around. The reason? The tunnel linking the two boroughs has needed repairs since Superstorm Sandy flooded the city in 2012. And while another option is on the table, that plan would take twice as long as a full tunnel shutdown and drastically reduce service on one of the city’s busiest subway lines. Vincent Barone, a transportation reporter for amNewYork, is on top of this story and joins us tonight to break down both options and tell us what a shutdown could mean for the city.

Next, the Orlando massacre was a harrowing reminder of the legitimate safety fears that members of the LGBT community face every day. For LGBT youth, these alarming challenges of harassment, abuse, and bullying can be part of their daily lives as they go to school. Research shows that more than 81 percent of LGBT youth reported being harassed because of their sexual orientation. Now, New York City’s Department of Education has taken an important step in providing positive and supportive school environments for LGBT students. For the first time, the department is hiring an LGBT community liaison to facilitate making schools an inclusive space for these students and developing an LGBT curriculum for teachers. New York City Council Member Daniel Dromm spearheaded this initiative and he joins us tonight to talk about it.

Finally, Political commentator and #1 New York Times best-selling author Brad Thor has written over 16 books featuring Scot Haravath, a former navy seal turned espionage and counter-terrorism operative. In his latest installment to this thriller series, Foreign Agent, the story continues as Haravath goes on a journey to track down a dangerous terrorist. It’s certainly a story that bears relevance to current events, and Thor is with us today to talk about the Orlando terror attacks, his latest novel, and to speak on some controversial statements he made on the Glenn Beck Show

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July 01, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Every weekday over 200,000 people use the “L” train to shuttle between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and now, talks of a shutdown could mean that all of them would need to find another way to get around. The reason? The tunnel linking the two boroughs has needed repairs since Superstorm Sandy flooded the city in 2012. And while another option is on the table, that plan would take twice as long as a full tunnel shutdown and drastically reduce service on one of the city’s busiest subway lines. Vincent Barone, a transportation reporter for amNewYork, is on top of this story and joins us tonight to break down both options and tell us what a shutdown could mean for the city.

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June 30, 2016 at 6:28 pm

The New York Aquarium in Brooklyn is the oldest continually operating aquarium in the United States. The Wildlife Conservation Society oversees it and four other zoos in New York, and now this beloved aquarium is getting a face-lift. So what can the city’s marine-life-lovers expect from the changes? Cristian Samper, President and CEO of The Wildlife Conservation Society gives us a preview.

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June 30, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Meryl Meisler first stepped off the subway at the intersection of Myrtle and Wyckoff Avenues in December of 1981. She was about to start a full-time job as a public school art teacher in the neighborhood that hadn’t recovered from the riots four years earlier. Instead of letting devastating scenery get her down, she started a photo project in which she took photos of the people and places that celebrated the spirit of Bushwick. For decades, she kept her photos to herself, but in 2007, she started showing them in galleries, eventually pairing these photos with pictures of the disco era snapshots she had from 1970’s disco clubs. She tells us about her book, A Tale of Two Cities: Disco Era Bushwick and we get a glimpse of the Brooklyn she saw in 1981.

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Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross, and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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