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May 13, 2016 at 6:28 pm

The Bronx is on fire, but probably not the way you’d think. A new report from the Real Estate Board of New York shows that the city’s often forgotten outer boroughs, The Bronx and Staten Island, are hot with buyers. Over the last twelve months, these boroughs have seen a 35% surge in home sales; the largest gains in the metropolitan area so far this year. Reporter Ivan Pereira of amNew York has an inside look at what’s behind this outer borough housing boom.

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Episode
May 10, 2016 at 5:48 am

Kurt Eichenwald, a senior writer for Newsweek, stops by to explain his article “American Democracy Was Broken Before Trump.” How does he view the quality of American democracy and the 2016 Presidential election? We’ll find out tonight. There was outrage and anger in Brooklyn last month when many New Yorkers showed up to the polls for the April 19 primaries and found out they couldn’t vote. Officials say over 125,000 voters were mysteriously removed from the rolls, leading New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer to launch an audit of the city’s Board of Elections. He joins us tonight with the latest on his investigation. Then next, guns and Christianity. For some in America, the two are inextricably linked. Yet is it possible to be pro-gun and pro-life? In her new documentary, The Armor of Light, filmmaker Abigail Disney follows the story of a reverend as he struggles to piece together how guns should fit into his ministry, and how they already do. She joins us to discuss the relationship between the church and guns, and how this documentary challenges those ideas. Finally, survival in the animal kingdom may just depend on making friends. Many animals, from the largest to the smallest, often bond with the most unexpected collaborators to succeed in the wild. Executive Producer of PBS Nature, Fred Kaufman, stops by to discuss the new film Nature’s Perfect Partners, which premieres on May 11th and follows the bond between some of the most unexpected pairs in the animal kingdom.

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Episode
April 26, 2016 at 5:46 am

Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz and John Kasich team up in an effort to deny Donald Trump the republican presidential nomination, while Hillary Clinton is reportedly scouting for potential running mates. Behind the scenes, Bernie Sanders is pressing for a prominent role in drafting the platform for the Democratic Convention. This all continues to unfold as the candidates prepare to face-off tomorrow in the Connecticut primary. FiveThirtyEight’s senior political writer and analyst Harry Enten joins us with the latest and a look at the significance of the Nutmeg State’s primary. Then, are we safe from another big terrorist attack? Juliette Kayyem, former Assistant Secretary for Homeland Security weighs in on the threat assessment post Paris and Brussels, and speaks candidly on how she balances a life on the front lines of terror and as a mom at home. Next, when school budget cuts come up, arts and music programs can be some of the first on the chopping block. Yet research has shown the positive impact of arts education on children’s overall success in school. A non-profit called ProjectArt provides art classes in public libraries around New York City, in neighborhoods where local schools have had to cut art classes. Finally, Central Park is among New York City’s most famous landmarks. But a nearly bankrupt New York City in the 1970’s saw a city-wide disintegration of park services, which left the park crime-ridden and painted with graffiti. Enter Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, who launched the Central Park Conservancy in the 1980’s and restored the park back to its former glory. Rogers chronicles the development of Central Park and six other of the city’s green treasures in her book, Green Metropolis: The Extraordinary Landscapes of New York City as Nature, History, and Design.

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Episode
April 23, 2016 at 6:40 am

North Carolina made headlines last month after Governor Pat McCrory signed a bill limiting public restroom access for transgender individuals. This week, a federal appeals court overturned a similar anti-transgender policy at a Virginia high school, which may affect the challenges being made to the North Carolina law. Mitchell Gold, a prominent gay activist and the chairman of North Carolina-based furniture company Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, joins us to discuss North Carolina’s “bathroom bill” and its broader implications. Today is Earth Day, and the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement. We’re getting into the spirit by taking a look at one of New York City’s smelliest treasures. The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn has earned a reputation for its less-than-glamorous odor. What most people don’t know though, is the role the canal played in famous chapters of American history, including the Revolutionary War and the Industrial Revolution. The author and historian of the book Gowanus: Brooklyn’s Curious Canal digs into the waterway’s past and explores how the canal shaped modern-day Brooklyn. Next, Every day, about one hundred thousand New York City kids make their way through metal detectors on their way to class. Metal detectors in schools have become a prominent security measure not only in New York City, but across the country. While supporters point to dangers they’ve prevented, proponents of their removal claim they make schools feel like prisons. Are they necessary? Greg Floyd, president of Teamsters Local 237, which represents the city’s school safety officers, explores the debate. Finally, exclusive and expensive: two words often synonymous with arts and culture in New York City. But think again. NYC Inspires is a new initiative that seeks to change that perception by making city landmarks more affordable and accessible. The program is set on raising forty million dollars in funding with the aim of getting kids out of the classroom and into some of the cultural treasures across all five boroughs. New York City Council Member and Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer is a supporter, and he explains the importance of having students experience these cultural institutions.

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April 22, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Today is Earth Day, and the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement. We’re getting into the spirit by taking a look at one of New York City’s smelliest treasures. The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn has earned a reputation for its less-than-glamorous odor. What most people don’t know though, is the role the canal played in famous chapters of American history, including the Revolutionary War and the Industrial Revolution. The author and historian of the book Gowanus: Brooklyn’s Curious Canal digs into the waterway’s past and explores how the canal shaped modern-day Brooklyn.

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Episode
April 13, 2016 at 5:26 am

The political climate is heating up here in New York as Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton prepare to duke it out Thursday night in Brooklyn. So what can we expect when they take center stage for their debate later this week? Political analyst and Sanders supporter Nomiki Konst joins Mike Morey, a Clinton backer and the former communications director for New York Senator Chuck Schumer, for a preview of the much anticipated debate.
The gloves have been off for quite some time, and as the New York primary campaign wages on, there’s little suggestion the tides will change. Indeed, Texas Senator and Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz’s first appearance in the city was met with jeering and heckling. Even Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr. had words for the candidate, calling him a “hypocrite.” He explains his position with us. Next, the remarkable life of baseball legend Jackie Robinson is the focus of Ken Burns latest series airing tonight on PBS. Years since the baseball luminary’s passing, he continues to excite public fascination, but for those who actually lived this history firsthand, it left an indelible mark. Media legend Larry King shares what it was like to witness Robinson take to the field for the first time. Finally, anyone who has visited Central Park knows it’s not just a walk in any old park, but a 750-acre nature oasis in the middle of a bustling metropolis. Well, tune in tonight and prepare to explore the city parks that have transformed the face of our country. The PBS and WTTW series 10 That Changed America transports viewers to the public spaces that have influenced the way we live, work, and play. Of course, Central Park and the High Line get their 15 minutes and for good reason.

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April 12, 2016 at 6:25 pm

Anyone who has visited Central Park knows it’s not just a walk in any old park, but a 750-acre nature oasis in the middle of a bustling metropolis. Well, tune in tonight and prepare to explore the city parks that have transformed the face of our country. The PBS and WTTW series 10 That Changed America transports viewers to the public spaces that have influenced the way we live, work, and play. Of course, Central Park and the High Line get their 15 minutes and for good reason.

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Episode
March 19, 2016 at 5:00 am

The New York Times Reporter Steve Eder shares the findings from his investigation into claims against Donald Trump’s business school, Trump University. We hear from Newark Teachers Union President John Abeigon about the threat of lead in New Jersey schools’ water. Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams tells us why he thinks New York should lift the ban on professional mixed martial arts fighting. And actor and 80s heartthrob Andrew McCarthy of the “Brat Pack” joins us to discuss his career in beloved movies like “St. Elmo’s Fire” and “Pretty In Pink” and his role in ABC’s new drama, “The Family.”

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