Episode
May 18, 2016 at 5:56 am

Gentrification. The word has become ingrained in our society as it spreads across the country. As gentrification changes the nature of cities across America through displacement of long-time residents, a new short documentary Degentrify America, which is part of the Take 5: Justice in America series from AMC Networks’ SundanceNow Doc Club, looks at this trend’s impact closer to home in Crown Heights, Brooklyn. This past March there were 60,000 people in New York City’s homeless shelter system. Over 23,000 were children. Former City Council Speaker Christine Quinn is the head of the city’s largest shelter organization called Women in Need, and invited us to look at how they are helping families rebuild their lives. Next, he’s been to the moon and back, but now he’s taken one giant leap onto MetroFocus. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin continues to explore and advocate for space travel 46 years after the Apollo 11 mission landed him on the moon. We meet Aldrin in the Space Shuttle Pavilion on the deck of the Intrepid Museum where he opens up with us about his famous journey, and talks about the lessons he’s sharing in his new book No Dream is Too High: Life Lessons From a Man Who Walked On The Moon. Finally, the Big Apple is home to a variety of exotic wildlife, and we’re not talking about pigeons and rodents. You might not think wildlife when you hear New York City, but endangered animals inhabit the surrounding waters and face constant danger. Cristián Samper, the President and CEO of the Wildlife Conservation Society, shares what the organization is doing to ensure their survival.

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May 17, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Gentrification. The word has become ingrained in our society as it spreads across the country. As gentrification changes the nature of cities across America through displacement of long-time residents, a new short documentary Degentrify America, which is part of the Take 5: Justice in America series from AMC Networks’ SundanceNow Doc Club, looks at this trend’s impact closer to home in Crown Heights, Brooklyn.

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Clip
May 17, 2016 at 6:25 pm

The Big Apple is home to a variety of exotic wildlife, and we’re not talking about pigeons and rodents. You might not think wildlife when you hear New York City, but endangered animals inhabit the surrounding waters and face constant danger. Cristián Samper, the President and CEO of the Wildlife Conservation Society, shares what the organization is doing to ensure their survival.

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Episode
May 17, 2016 at 5:50 am

Tonight, Amy Goodman, a veteran journalist and host of Democracy Now, breaks down all that is wrong with the media’s coverage of Election 2016, and shares her experiences on the ground covering under-served communities and under-reported stories in her new book Democracy Now: Twenty Years Covering the Movements Changing America. Then, can your trash be another man’s treasure? For some Americans, called Recyclers, gathering bottles, cans and other materials from our nation’s vast rivers of trash is a way of life and their only source of income. In the new documentary Dogtown Redemption, filmmakers Amir Soltani and Chihiro Wimbush chronicle the lives of three recyclers over seven years as they navigate the streets of West Oakland in search of recyclables. Finally, why is a girl from Queens singing country tunes? Cyndi Lauper burst onto the music scene in the 1980’s with the iconic pop song “Girls Just Want To Have Fun” and has covered everything from Rock and Roll to Broadway with her hit show “Kinky Boots.” Now, the music legend is exploring another genre: this time with a good ole’ Nashville country album titled “Detour.” Lauper tells us why her fun isn’t found just with pop music, but country classics that have had a big impact on her life.

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May 16, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Can your trash be another man’s treasure? For some Americans, called Recyclers, gathering bottles, cans and other materials from our nation’s vast rivers of trash is a way of life and their only source of income. In the new documentary Dogtown Redemption, filmmakers Amir Soltani and Chihiro Wimbush chronicle the lives of three recyclers over seven years as they navigate the streets of West Oakland in search of recyclables.

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May 13, 2016 at 6:28 pm

The Bronx is on fire, but probably not the way you’d think. A new report from the Real Estate Board of New York shows that the city’s often forgotten outer boroughs, The Bronx and Staten Island, are hot with buyers. Over the last twelve months, these boroughs have seen a 35% surge in home sales; the largest gains in the metropolitan area so far this year. Reporter Ivan Pereira of amNew York has an inside look at what’s behind this outer borough housing boom.

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Episode
May 10, 2016 at 5:48 am

Kurt Eichenwald, a senior writer for Newsweek, stops by to explain his article “American Democracy Was Broken Before Trump.” How does he view the quality of American democracy and the 2016 Presidential election? We’ll find out tonight. There was outrage and anger in Brooklyn last month when many New Yorkers showed up to the polls for the April 19 primaries and found out they couldn’t vote. Officials say over 125,000 voters were mysteriously removed from the rolls, leading New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer to launch an audit of the city’s Board of Elections. He joins us tonight with the latest on his investigation. Then next, guns and Christianity. For some in America, the two are inextricably linked. Yet is it possible to be pro-gun and pro-life? In her new documentary, The Armor of Light, filmmaker Abigail Disney follows the story of a reverend as he struggles to piece together how guns should fit into his ministry, and how they already do. She joins us to discuss the relationship between the church and guns, and how this documentary challenges those ideas. Finally, survival in the animal kingdom may just depend on making friends. Many animals, from the largest to the smallest, often bond with the most unexpected collaborators to succeed in the wild. Executive Producer of PBS Nature, Fred Kaufman, stops by to discuss the new film Nature’s Perfect Partners, which premieres on May 11th and follows the bond between some of the most unexpected pairs in the animal kingdom.

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Episode
April 26, 2016 at 5:46 am

Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz and John Kasich team up in an effort to deny Donald Trump the republican presidential nomination, while Hillary Clinton is reportedly scouting for potential running mates. Behind the scenes, Bernie Sanders is pressing for a prominent role in drafting the platform for the Democratic Convention. This all continues to unfold as the candidates prepare to face-off tomorrow in the Connecticut primary. FiveThirtyEight’s senior political writer and analyst Harry Enten joins us with the latest and a look at the significance of the Nutmeg State’s primary. Then, are we safe from another big terrorist attack? Juliette Kayyem, former Assistant Secretary for Homeland Security weighs in on the threat assessment post Paris and Brussels, and speaks candidly on how she balances a life on the front lines of terror and as a mom at home. Next, when school budget cuts come up, arts and music programs can be some of the first on the chopping block. Yet research has shown the positive impact of arts education on children’s overall success in school. A non-profit called ProjectArt provides art classes in public libraries around New York City, in neighborhoods where local schools have had to cut art classes. Finally, Central Park is among New York City’s most famous landmarks. But a nearly bankrupt New York City in the 1970’s saw a city-wide disintegration of park services, which left the park crime-ridden and painted with graffiti. Enter Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, who launched the Central Park Conservancy in the 1980’s and restored the park back to its former glory. Rogers chronicles the development of Central Park and six other of the city’s green treasures in her book, Green Metropolis: The Extraordinary Landscapes of New York City as Nature, History, and Design.

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MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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