Episode
April 28, 2016 at 5:46 am

As the chances for scoring the delegates needed to be anointed each party’s standard-bearer becomes slimmer and slimmer with each passing primary, the remaining state contests have become bloodier and bloodier. Yesterday’s primaries in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Delaware, and Maryland were no different, resulting in Donald Trump sweeping all five state contests, and Hillary Clinton winning all but Rhode Island. Both candidates are now looking toward the general election. Political analysts Ellis Henican and Amy Holmes discuss the results, and what the next moves are for the remaining candidates on their path to the White House. Next, New York City wasn’t built in a day. It involved savvy, skill, and sweat for the major “modern day” real estate moguls who built it into the commanding metropolis that it is. Amir Korangy’s publication The Real Deal has been hailed as “the Bible” of the real estate industry by development gurus, and now he gives us a candid glimpse into the genius of the city’s real estate titans in a book of compiled conversations with these men and women. Korangy joins us to talk about real estate mogul-turned presidential candidate Donald Trump, and the influence of power-playing developers in shaping New York City’s famous skyline. Then finally, Shakespeare said “all the world’s a stage,” but not everyone can make it in the cutthroat and competitive world of entertainment. Thousands of young and talented performing artists that live in the city are realizing that it takes much more than just talent to succeed. It takes business savvy too. Dr. William F. Baker, the former president of Thirteen/WNET, and currently a professor at Juilliard and Fordham University, is here with his new book The World’s Your Stage. In it, he shares inside knowledge about the entertainment industry, and his advice for how graduating arts students can make themselves more financially grounded.

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April 27, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Shakespeare said “all the world’s a stage,” but not everyone can make it in the cutthroat and competitive world of entertainment. Thousands of young and talented performing artists that live in the city are realizing that it takes much more than just talent to succeed. It takes business savvy too. Dr. William F. Baker, the former president of Thirteen/WNET, and currently a professor at Juilliard and Fordham University, is here with his new book The World’s Your Stage. In it, he shares inside knowledge about the entertainment industry, and his advice for how graduating arts students can make themselves more financially grounded.

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Episode
April 27, 2016 at 5:46 am

Anti-Israeli sentiment on college campuses has now hit close to home as graduate student unions from New York University and CUNY vote to boycott the Jewish state. But are these protests anti-Zionist or anti-Semitic? And are Jewish students becoming the scapegoats, and the real victims? We speak with an activist who is investigating anti-Semitism on college campuses across the country. The sacrament of communion is banned for divorced and remarried Catholics, but is Pope Francis about to change that? As the pope continues his mission of mercy, his recent exhortation Amoris Laetitia has sparked debate among the world’s 1.2 billion Catholics for its call to welcome divorced and remarried worshipers. Monsignor Jim Lisante, host of the radio and TV program “Personally Speaking,” joins us with reaction to Pope Francis’ recent exhortation, and its future impact on the Catholic Church. The Girl Scouts don’t just sell cookies, they chase dreams. But for around 70% of the 29,000 girls in the Girl Scouts of Greater New York – particularly its Black and Latina scouts – poverty and a lack of resources makes it harder for them to focus on their education. We see how the organization is working to help these girls overcome poverty, and this troubling trend. Finally, as we celebrate the legacy of William Shakespeare four centuries after his death, we offer a look at the bard, with a twist, and five shots of whiskey! Meet the actors behind the theater phenomenon “Drunk Shakespeare”. They give us a taste of their show, and we only hope they’re sober.

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April 26, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Anti-Israeli sentiment on college campuses has now hit close to home as graduate student unions from New York University and CUNY vote to boycott the Jewish state. But are these protests anti-Zionist or anti-Semitic? And are Jewish students becoming the scapegoats, and the real victims? We speak with an activist who is investigating anti-Semitism on college campuses across the country.

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Clip
April 26, 2016 at 6:26 pm

The Girl Scouts don’t just sell cookies, they chase dreams. But for around 70% of the 29,000 girls in the Girl Scouts of Greater New York particularly its Black and Latina scouts – poverty and a lack of resources makes it harder for them to focus on their education. We see how the organization is working to help these girls overcome poverty, and this troubling trend.

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Episode
April 26, 2016 at 5:46 am

Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz and John Kasich team up in an effort to deny Donald Trump the republican presidential nomination, while Hillary Clinton is reportedly scouting for potential running mates. Behind the scenes, Bernie Sanders is pressing for a prominent role in drafting the platform for the Democratic Convention. This all continues to unfold as the candidates prepare to face-off tomorrow in the Connecticut primary. FiveThirtyEight’s senior political writer and analyst Harry Enten joins us with the latest and a look at the significance of the Nutmeg State’s primary. Then, are we safe from another big terrorist attack? Juliette Kayyem, former Assistant Secretary for Homeland Security weighs in on the threat assessment post Paris and Brussels, and speaks candidly on how she balances a life on the front lines of terror and as a mom at home. Next, when school budget cuts come up, arts and music programs can be some of the first on the chopping block. Yet research has shown the positive impact of arts education on children’s overall success in school. A non-profit called ProjectArt provides art classes in public libraries around New York City, in neighborhoods where local schools have had to cut art classes. Finally, Central Park is among New York City’s most famous landmarks. But a nearly bankrupt New York City in the 1970’s saw a city-wide disintegration of park services, which left the park crime-ridden and painted with graffiti. Enter Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, who launched the Central Park Conservancy in the 1980’s and restored the park back to its former glory. Rogers chronicles the development of Central Park and six other of the city’s green treasures in her book, Green Metropolis: The Extraordinary Landscapes of New York City as Nature, History, and Design.

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April 25, 2016 at 6:26 pm

When school budget cuts come up, arts and music programs can be some of the first on the chopping block. Yet research has shown the positive impact of arts education on children’s overall success in school. A non-profit called ProjectArt provides art classes in public libraries around New York City, in neighborhoods where local schools have had to cut art classes.

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Episode
April 23, 2016 at 6:40 am

North Carolina made headlines last month after Governor Pat McCrory signed a bill limiting public restroom access for transgender individuals. This week, a federal appeals court overturned a similar anti-transgender policy at a Virginia high school, which may affect the challenges being made to the North Carolina law. Mitchell Gold, a prominent gay activist and the chairman of North Carolina-based furniture company Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, joins us to discuss North Carolina’s “bathroom bill” and its broader implications. Today is Earth Day, and the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement. We’re getting into the spirit by taking a look at one of New York City’s smelliest treasures. The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn has earned a reputation for its less-than-glamorous odor. What most people don’t know though, is the role the canal played in famous chapters of American history, including the Revolutionary War and the Industrial Revolution. The author and historian of the book Gowanus: Brooklyn’s Curious Canal digs into the waterway’s past and explores how the canal shaped modern-day Brooklyn. Next, Every day, about one hundred thousand New York City kids make their way through metal detectors on their way to class. Metal detectors in schools have become a prominent security measure not only in New York City, but across the country. While supporters point to dangers they’ve prevented, proponents of their removal claim they make schools feel like prisons. Are they necessary? Greg Floyd, president of Teamsters Local 237, which represents the city’s school safety officers, explores the debate. Finally, exclusive and expensive: two words often synonymous with arts and culture in New York City. But think again. NYC Inspires is a new initiative that seeks to change that perception by making city landmarks more affordable and accessible. The program is set on raising forty million dollars in funding with the aim of getting kids out of the classroom and into some of the cultural treasures across all five boroughs. New York City Council Member and Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer is a supporter, and he explains the importance of having students experience these cultural institutions.

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April 22, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Every day, about one hundred thousand New York City kids make their way through metal detectors on their way to class. Metal detectors in schools have become a prominent security measure not only in New York City, but across the country. While supporters point to dangers they’ve prevented, proponents of their removal claim they make schools feel like prisons. Are they necessary? Greg Floyd, president of Teamsters Local 237, which represents the city’s school safety officers, explores the debate..

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