Episode
November 18, 2016 at 5:46 am

Tonight, Mayor de Blasio and President-Elect Donald Trump met for more than an hour yesterday where they discussed, among many things, Trump’s campaign promise to deport millions of undocumented immigrants, and build a wall along the Mexican border. But what are the realities of his policies, and are the fears of undocumented immigrants legitimate? Michael Wildes, the immigration lawyer who defended the citizenship status of Melania Trump, joins us with his take on the future of immigration under Donald Trump.

Next, we’ve witnessed a significant increase in hate crimes across the country following last week’s election, including here in New York, where Governor Cuomo launched an investigation after swastika graffiti was discovered at student accommodation buildings at SUNY Geneseo. President-Elect Donald Trump has recently confronted the issue on 60 Minutes, but that has done little to assuage the fears of many who have been targeted. We discuss it all with Huffington Post journalist and Muslim-American Rowaida Abdelaziz and New York City Council-member Ritchie Torres.

Then, when natural disaster strikes, one New York-based organization is there to wade through flood waters and dig through debris to save animals. They’re the Guardians of Rescue, but they do much more than just enter disaster zones. Founder Robert Misseri joins us with a look at their mission protecting the well-being of animals in our community that are homeless, helpless and in need of a hug.

Finally, scattered across the five boroughs of New York City are vibrant organizations serving children and adults of all ages and from every walk of life. These are the settlement houses: centers that provide help and new opportunity to our urban population. The new documentary Treasures of New York: Settlement Houses, which airs tonight at 8pm on WLIW, explores how the 130-year old settlement house movement remains integral to New York City.

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November 17, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Scattered across the five boroughs of New York City are vibrant organizations serving children and adults of all ages and from every walk of life. These are the settlement houses: centers that provide help and new opportunity to our urban population. The new documentary Treasures of New York: Settlement Houses, which airs tonight at 8pm on WLIW, explores how the 130-year old settlement house movement remains integral to New York City.

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Episode
November 16, 2016 at 5:30 am

New York City is once again stepping up security after ISIS stated in their magazine, Rumiyah, that the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade was an “excellent target” for an act of terrorism. The threat goes on to suggest the use of a car or vehicle to maximize destruction, reminiscent of the recent attack in Nice, where a 20-ton truck plowed through a crowded Bastille Day celebration. So is this a real threat? And if it is, what safety measures are being put in place to protect this holiday tradition? On tonight’s Listening In, NYPD Deputy Commissioner of Intelligence and Counter-Terrorism, John Miller discusses his assessment of this Thanksgiving threat and how New York City law enforcement will answer it.

One of the most notorious jails in the country is located in the East River, right across from the Manhattan skyline. Rikers Island is New York City’s largest correctional facility and the abuse and corruption that runs rampant within its walls have been well documented by authors, journalists, and detainees alike. Yet almost 80 percent of the more than 7,500 men and women detained at Rikers on any given day have not been convicted of the charges they face. Whether guilty or innocent, all the detainees find themselves in a culture of violence and fear that forces them to do whatever is necessary to survive. In this installment of Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America, we take a look at a candid and harrowing documentary by Bill Moyers, Rikers brings viewers face to face with the men and women who have endured the correctional facility and lived to tell the tale. Tonight, award-winning director, longtime colleague of Bill Moyers, and producer of the film, Marc Levin joins us with Glenn E. Martin, a former Rikers detainee and President of JustLeadershipUSA, to discuss the film and the horrible truths within the walls at Rikers Island.

In the United States alone, more than 65 million people provide care for a chronically ill, disabled, or elderly loved one during any given year. Caregiving is a job that can take its toll physically and emotionally, as the duty of looking after loved ones can add additional pressure to life’s day-to-day responsibilities. T.V. host and advocate Leeza Gibbons understands this struggle after taking care of her own mother during her fight with Alzheimer’s and going through additional health problems with her father. But while others might feel overwhelmed, Leeza is empowered to help other caregivers cope with the unique role of looking after their loved ones with her charity, Leeza’s Care Connection, using the money she won on President-elect Donald Trump’s former program, The Celebrity Apprentice. Tonight, in honor of National Caregivers Month, Leeza Gibbons joins us to talk about her organization, share her advice, and support other caregivers around the country.

You can’t see where you’re going unless you know where you’ve been. At least, that’s the way the Museum of the City of New York sees it in a new exhibit, “New York at Its Core.” The permanent display takes visitors through a comprehensive history of the Big Apple, from its colonial beginnings as a Dutch village to the beloved mecca of art, culture, and innovation it is today. MetroFocus’ Andrea Vasquez takes us to the first-of-its-kind exhibit before its premiere this weekend and shows us how the history of our city comes alive and helps us envision its bright future.

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November 15, 2016 at 6:26 pm

You can’t see where you’re going unless you know where you’ve been. At least, that’s the way the Museum of the City of New York sees it in a new exhibit, “New York at Its Core.” The permanent display takes visitors through a comprehensive history of the Big Apple, from its colonial beginnings as a Dutch village to the beloved mecca of art, culture, and innovation it is today. MetroFocus’ Andrea Vasquez takes us to the first-of-its-kind exhibit before its premiere this weekend and shows us how the history of our city comes alive and helps us envision its bright future.

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November 14, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Bullying in schools is reportedly on the rise after President-elect Trump’s victory last week. Parents across the Tri-state are already raising concerns after hearing about taunting between classmates involving the campaign. Tonight we take a look at the issue with help from NBC New York, which recently investigated reports of bullying in Suffolk County, Long Island. Then we’ll be joined […]

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Episode
November 11, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, President Obama welcomed Donald Trump to the White House this morning to begin the process of passing the presidential torch to his newly-elected successor. Last night, anti-Trump protests erupted across the country, from Los Angeles, where American flags were burned in the streets, to Chicago, where police barricades were erected to try and control the crowds. The streets of Manhattan were no exception. Thousands chanted slogans such as, “Donald Trump, go away. Racist. Sexist. Anti-gay,” as they marched from Union Square to Trump Tower. 65 New Yorkers were arrested, mostly on charges of disorderly conduct outside of Trump’s headquarters and penthouse apartment, and some burned the American flag and effigies of Donald Trump in the street. All of this comes after the Democratic candidate, Hillary Clinton, asked her supporters to give the president-elect a “chance to lead.” Tonight, we fill you in on the protesting and give updates on the many pending legal battles that are moving forward despite Trump’s win.

Next, President-Elect Donald Trump may have taken home a big win for the Republican party, which is not only poised to hold the presidency but the majority in Congress as well. While many in the GOP are excited to hold much of the nation’s power, one prominent Republican is not enthused at the thought of having Donald Trump as our Commander in Chief. Christine Todd Whitman was formerly the Governor of New Jersey and hasn’t been a fan of Trump since the beginning of his campaign. In fact, she’s gone so far as to urge her fellow Republicans to vote for Hillary Clinton. Tonight, she joins us to react to Trump’s victory and discuss how these developments may affect her party.

Then, tomorrow is Veterans Day, a U.S. holiday that commemorates the signing of the armistice between the Allied nations and Germany in 1918 and the official end of World War I. In the 98 years that have passed, we take the day to remember and thank veterans for their service to protect our beloved Land of the Free. Here in Manhattan, the New York City Veterans Day Parade pays homage to our servicemen at home and abroad and allows New Yorkers to show their respect and support every November 11th. Held and organized by the United War Veterans Council, this year’s parade is sure to be an amazing event. Tonight, we discuss the festivities with Dan McSweeney and Ryan Hegg, two members of the council who organize the parade every year.

Also, in 2010 DOC NYC began it’s inaugural year in the West Village’s IFC Center, hosting over 60 events over the course of seven days. Six years later DOC NYC has become one of, if not the largest, documentary film festivals in the country, having showcased over 200 films and events last year. This festival promises to continue the tradition as they host hundreds of new, ground-breaking films. We have an inside look at the cinematic excitement to come as DOC NYC’s Artistic Director Thom Powers gives us a preview of what’s to come.

Finally, the Hearst Tower stands as an impressive, geometric contribution to the iconic New York City skyline. The 46-story-tall steel and glass skyscraper sits atop an art deco base that was originally built in 1928 and gives a stunning picture of New York City’s past and present. The building, its construction, and its history is explored in Treasures of New York, Hearst Tower. We have a preview of this documentary with Lord Norman Foster, Pritzker Prize-winning architect, as well as the architect behind the design of the Hearst Tower, who will take us for a unique tour of the building. Also, don’t miss the full episode, which airs tonight at 8 p.m. on WLIW and Sunday November 13th at 7 p.m. on Thirteen.

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November 10, 2016 at 6:26 pm

The Hearst Tower stands as an impressive, geometric contribution to the iconic New York City skyline. The 46-story-tall steel and glass skyscraper sits atop an art deco base that was originally built in 1928 and gives a stunning picture of New York City’s past and present. The building, its construction, and its history is explored in Treasures of New York, Hearst Tower. We have a preview of this documentary with Lord Norman Foster, Pritzker Prize-winning architect, as well as the architect behind the design of the Hearst Tower, who will take us for a unique tour of the building. Also, don’t miss the full episode, which airs tonight at 8 p.m. on WLIW and Sunday November 13th at 7 p.m. on Thirteen.

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Episode
November 09, 2016 at 5:27 am

Tonight, today is a historic day in the making, but we don’t know how the election will turn out yet. It could be a blowout, a traditional victory that separates the candidates by several points, or it could be a real nail-biter such as the 2000 race between Al Gore and George W. Bush, where weeks of political disputes and recounting delayed the final results. Besides that infamous contest, which immortalized “the hanging chad,” what other election thrillers have there been in our nation’s history? Presidential historian and CNN contributor Tim Naftali joins us with a look back at more close calls in American election history.

Then, on June 11, 2016, 28-year-old Jessica White watched her children play on a playground outside of the John Adams Housing project in the Bronx. She was talking with her mother, Gola White when shots rang out in the area. In a split-second decision that any mother would have made, Jessica ran over to protect her three children; but that decision would ultimately cost her her life. Jessica White is just one of many who have fallen victim to crime in the Bronx’s 40th precinct, and although New York City crime is at a historic low, each tragic loss of life calls more attention to an issue of security in the South Bronx. To understand why these killings persist, The New York Times committed a team of reporters to the neighborhood at the beginning of this year. In a series of in-depth articles published throughout 2016, they documented the lives of those lost. Two members of that reporting team Benjamin Mueller and Al Baker join us tonight.

Finally, between 2001 and 2014, more than 5,300 U.S. service members were killed in action during the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, but out of the thousands of wounded soldiers who made it to combat hospitals, 96% made it home alive. Now, a new NJTV documentary, Military Medicine: Beyond the Battlefield, follows ABC News Correspondent Bob Woodruff to the front lines of medicine and explores how medical techniques have advanced and given hope to our wounded military service members.

Woodruff, who was critically injured in 2006 while covering the War in Iraq, joins us to share his deeply personal perspective towards military medicine and gives us a preview of the special before it airs on NJTV tomorrow night at 8 p.m. and nationally on PBS stations at 10 p.m. (Check your local listings).

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November 08, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Between 2001 and 2014, more than 5,300 U.S. service members were killed in action during the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, but out of the thousands of wounded soldiers who made it to combat hospitals, 96% made it home alive. Now, a new NJTV documentary, Military Medicine: Beyond the Battlefield, follows ABC News Correspondent Bob Woodruff to the front lines of medicine and explores how medical techniques have advanced and given hope to our wounded military service members.
Woodruff, who was critically injured in 2006 while covering the War in Iraq, joins us to share his deeply personal perspective towards military medicine and gives us a preview of the special before it airs on NJTV tomorrow night at 8 p.m. and nationally on PBS stations at 10 p.m. (Check your local listings).

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Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, Ellen and James S. Marcus, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross.

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