Clip
May 26, 2016 at 6:27 pm

The public four-year high school graduation rate for New York City students has recently hit a high of 70 percent, and although that number may not sound like much, it is 2 percentage points higher than the previous year. As part of our ongoing initiative, Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America, we spotlight one Harlem school who has proved that the average is not the norm. At the St. Aloysius School in Harlem, students go on to graduate from high school at a rate of 96 percent. But that success may soon be cut short because the school, which has been a fixture in the community for 76 years, will be forced to close its doors for good. If St. Aloysius cannot reach its fundraising goals by next month, the community will lose this Harlem beacon of hope forever.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 25, 2016 at 5:59 am

Trailer parks. Beyond the stigma and the stereotypes, for families who can’t afford a traditional home, they can be a lifeline worth fighting for. That’s why neighbors from a Long Island trailer park in Nassau County recently banded together to stave off eviction and save their homes. Their struggle is the subject of a Newsday documentary, The Last Trailer Park. Tonight, as part of our ongoing initiative, “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” we take a look at the film and speak with its producer. Then tonight, we also delve into an epidemic impacting thousands of Americans across the Tri-State every year: eviction. Harvard University professor Matthew Desmond gives us a firsthand look at the harsh realities of living in a trailer park. The sociologist made one his home for about half a year and watched as families were evicted and forced into shelters. Desmond took thousands of pages of notes as he chronicled their stories. That research has been called “the most comprehensive, detailed data on American urban poverty, housing and eviction” and is now the foundation of his book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 21, 2016 at 5:59 am

She was one of the more than fifty women featured in The New York Times’ recent expose about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s treatment of women. Barbara Res was the lead engineer on the Trump Tower project, and now she’s sharing her experience working for the billionaire businessman. In light of some of Trump’s more controversial comments, how does she feel about her former boss seeking the highest office? Earlier this month, the New York state legislature passed a bill to raise New York’s minimum wage from $9 an hour to as much as $15 an hour. But how much you make may all depend on where you live in New York. Upstate workers will only reach $12.50 an hour, and that increase won’t be met until 2021. Though the legislation has been hailed as a victory by many in the state and around the country, for some low wage earners and small business owners, the pay increase comes with a dose of uncertainty. Jenna Flanagan has the story. Next, for 70 years, the non–profit Northside Center for Child Development in New York City has been an important resource for making sure children and families that are touched by mental illness have access to the support, acceptance and enrichment they deserve. For National Mental Health Awareness Month, ABC News correspondent and anchor Deborah Roberts, who supports the non-profit, and Dr. Thelma Dye, the center’s executive director, share how they are working to overcome the stigmas associated with mental health conditions. Then finally,over the course of a handful of months, New York Magazine reporters went to one block in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn. They knocked on every door, crashed the block party, and hunted through public records to track down and interview over sixty current and former block residents. The results not only revealed the transformation of the people there, but also the history of a single neighborhood over the past 135 years. Senior Editor of New York Magazine Genevieve Smith shares their story.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 20, 2016 at 6:26 pm

For 70 years, the non–profit Northside Center for Child Development in New York City has been an important resource for making sure children and families that are touched by mental illness have access to the support, acceptance and enrichment they deserve. For National Mental Health Awareness Month, ABC News correspondent and anchor Deborah Roberts, who supports the non-profit, and Dr. Thelma Dye, the center’s executive director, share how they are working to overcome the stigmas associated with mental health conditions.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 10, 2016 at 6:10 pm

More than 23-million adults and adolescents in the United States struggle with addiction every day. If you are battling an addiction and need help, please contact the American Addiction Centers at 888-969-8083. The number is toll free and they are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. HEROIN FAQS: COMMON TREATMENTS I. MEDICATION Methadone: tricks the brain into […]

Continue Reading

Episode
May 10, 2016 at 5:48 am

Kurt Eichenwald, a senior writer for Newsweek, stops by to explain his article “American Democracy Was Broken Before Trump.” How does he view the quality of American democracy and the 2016 Presidential election? We’ll find out tonight. There was outrage and anger in Brooklyn last month when many New Yorkers showed up to the polls for the April 19 primaries and found out they couldn’t vote. Officials say over 125,000 voters were mysteriously removed from the rolls, leading New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer to launch an audit of the city’s Board of Elections. He joins us tonight with the latest on his investigation. Then next, guns and Christianity. For some in America, the two are inextricably linked. Yet is it possible to be pro-gun and pro-life? In her new documentary, The Armor of Light, filmmaker Abigail Disney follows the story of a reverend as he struggles to piece together how guns should fit into his ministry, and how they already do. She joins us to discuss the relationship between the church and guns, and how this documentary challenges those ideas. Finally, survival in the animal kingdom may just depend on making friends. Many animals, from the largest to the smallest, often bond with the most unexpected collaborators to succeed in the wild. Executive Producer of PBS Nature, Fred Kaufman, stops by to discuss the new film Nature’s Perfect Partners, which premieres on May 11th and follows the bond between some of the most unexpected pairs in the animal kingdom.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 09, 2016 at 6:25 pm

Survival in the animal kingdom may just depend on making friends. Many animals, from the largest to the smallest, often bond with the most unexpected collaborators to succeed in the wild. Executive Producer of PBS Nature, Fred Kaufman, stops by to discuss the new film Nature’s Perfect Partners, which premieres on May 11th and follows the bond between some of the most unexpected pairs in the animal kingdom.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 07, 2016 at 5:49 am

On Wednesday, April 27th, over 700 law enforcement officers conducted a bust in a New York City housing authority complex in The Bronx. This one bust led to the arrest and indictment of over 120 suspected gang members. Despite this success and the success of similar sweeps in the city, gang-related violence has increased, accounting for half of 2015’s 1,042 shootings and 40% of its 318 murders. Shanduke McPhatter, a rehabilitated gang member, is the founder and the executive director of the nonprofit organization Gangstas Making Astronomical Community Changes, which works with formally incarcerated men and women to help them transition back into society. We discuss the increase in gang violence, G.M.A.C.C., and what steps are being taken to combat the city’s gang problems.

Next, you’ve probably heard of “The Three Tenors” and the “Three Musketeers,” but what about the “Three Doctors?” As part of our ongoing initiative “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” MetroFocus contributor Mike Schneider talks to Dr. Sampson Davis about how a pact between him and his friends when they were teenagers helped him survive the mean streets of Newark and achieve his dream of being a doctor. Then finally, love horse racing? Live in New York? Want to place a bet? You can’t! Not anymore. Tomorrow is the Kentucky Derby, but as some prepare to bet on those competing on the track, we’ll look back on New York in the 1970’s when the city was the only place outside of Nevada to legalize off-track betting. During that time, OTB parlors generated millions of dollars in bets each year, before it was wiped out in 2010. Filmmaker Joseph Fusco covers the rise and fall of this notorious chapter in his new documentary “Finish Line: The Rise and Demise of Off Track Betting.”

Continue Reading

Clip
May 06, 2016 at 6:26 pm

You’ve probably heard of “The Three Tenors” and the “Three Musketeers,” but what about the “Three Doctors?” As part of our ongoing initiative “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” MetroFocus contributor Mike Schneider talks to Dr. Sampson Davis about how a pact between him and his friends when they were teenagers helped him survive the mean streets of Newark and achieve his dream of being a doctor.

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

WNET

© 2016 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019