Episode
April 02, 2016 at 5:09 am

Small government, low taxes and fiscal restraint. Words synonymous with the origins of the tea party. Or are they? Author Jeff Nesbit was in the room when he witnessed the beginning of an alliance between big oil and big tobacco that would align with the aims of the tea party movement.
In part two of our candid conversation with former Democratic Sen. Bob Kerrey, he tells us why he’s backing Hillary Clinton even though he’s critical of her time as Secretary of State. The former Nebraska governor also shares his disappointment on how Congress has handled President Barack Obama’s Supreme Court nominee.
Move over Elmo, Grover, Oscar and Big Bird — there’s a new character coming to Sesame Street and her name is Julia. She’s part of a Sesame Workshop’s new nationwide initiative, “Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children.” Autism is the fastest-growing developmental disabilities, and we hear from Vice President of Community and Family Engagement Dr. Jeanette Betancourt about how Sesame Workshop’s new initiative aims to help families and children address its challenges.
With the season finale of AMC’s zombie juggernaut “The Walking Dead” on Sunday, we sit down with the man who brought you Rick Grimes and his gang. In the second of our two-part interview, AMC Networks President and CEO Josh Sapan joins us to discuss how the TV network is not only surviving but thriving amid the threat of nearly limitless channels, fractured viewership and competition from online venues.

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April 01, 2016 at 6:25 pm

Move over Elmo, Grover, Oscar and Big Bird — there’s a new character coming to Sesame Street and her name is Julia. She’s part of a Sesame Workshop’s new nationwide initiative, “Sesame Street and Autism: See Amazing in All Children.” Autism is the fastest-growing developmental disabilities, and we hear from Vice President of Community and Family Engagement Dr. Jeanette Betancourt about how Sesame Workshop’s new initiative aims to help families and children address its challenges.

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Episode
March 30, 2016 at 5:00 am

Under Republican Party rules, a candidate has to win at least 1,237 delegates during the primaries to clinch the presidential nomination. If every candidate falls short, then delegates will choose their nominee at an open convention. Candidate Donald Trump says he expects to have enough delegates to win the nomination over Sen. Ted Cruz and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, but just in case he doesn’t, the New York real estate mogul is working on a plan. American University History Professor Allan Lichtman joins us to discuss the likelihood of a contested Republican National Convention, and how Trump is working to avoid that fate.
The terrorist attacks in Belgium reignited the debate here in America over the surveillance of Muslim communities, with presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz stating law enforcement should increase patrols in “Muslim neighborhoods.” How is the Muslim community reacting to these comments? We sit down with Arab American Association of New York Director Linda Sarsour to hear her take.
Are you saving for retirement? If not, you might want to start considering it: about one in five New Yorkers over the age of 65 is living in poverty. For our ongoing initiative “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity and America,” we look at the growing problem with AARP New York State Director Beth Finkel and AARP Member Soossan Salmassi. So whether you’re already retired or have just begun to think about it, tune in to hear about the resources available to help you (and your parents and grandparents) make ends meet.
For the first time in its history, The Whitney Museum of American Art gets a new education center. Board of Trustees Co-Chair Laurie M. Tisch and Helena Rubinstein Chair of Education Kathryn Potts join us to share how the museum’s new education space is inspiring children, families and artists.

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Episode
March 23, 2016 at 5:00 am

Rabbis from across the country rally against Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump with a demonstration in our nation’s capitol. We’re speaking with Rabbi Joseph Potasnik, Executive Vice President of the New York Board of Rabbis, to find out why America’s Jewish leaders do not want to see him as Commander-in-Chief. It’s a murder case gripping Upstate New York: a 12-year-old boy strangled and his mother’s boyfriend is charged. The New York Times Albany Bureau Chief Jesse McKinley takes us inside a killing and upcoming trial that has put a small town on edge and has raised questions about racial bias and the people in charge of protecting us. For years a young special needs student endured vicious verbal, emotional and at times, even physical abuse at the hands of a school bully, all while administrators turned a blind eye. After two years of torment, the young girl transferred to a private institution and her parents sued her previous school. Now, after an eight-year legal battle, the courts have ruled in the family’s favor. In our ongoing American Graduate series, we get the details from the girl’s father and learn about a student’s rights and a school’s responsibilities from their family lawyer. Tomorrow is the Jewish holiday of Purim, which dictates one should drink to excess and celebrate, but it’s underlying message is sobering. But before you pick up that glass of wine tomorrow, take a visit with us to the Museum of Jewish Heritage in Manhattan.

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March 22, 2016 at 6:26 pm

For years a young special needs student endured vicious verbal, emotional and at times, even physical abuse at the hands of a school bully, all while administrators turned a blind eye. After two years of torment, the young girl transferred to a private institution and her parents sued her previous school. Now, after an eight-year legal battle, the courts have ruled in the family’s favor. In our ongoing American Graduate series, we get the details from the girl’s father and learn about a student’s rights and a school’s responsibilities from their family lawyer.

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Episode
March 22, 2016 at 5:00 am

We look at the latest on the presidential election with Journalist Ellis Henican and Manhattan Republican Party Chairwoman Adele Malpass. Plus, we discuss President Barack Obama’s historic trip to Cuba. Director of Columbia Law School’s Immigrants’ Rights Clinic Elora Mukherjee talks to us about the rights many immigrants do not know they have. In part three of our conversation with former late-night talk show host Dick Cavett, we hear about his next adventure.

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March 21, 2016 at 6:26 pm

New York City serves as a home for immigrants and asylum seekers all over but for many navigating the legal system alone is a challenge. Director of Columbia Law School’s Immigrants’ Rights Clinic Elora Mukherjee talks to us the rights many immigrants do not know they have and the importance of representing them.

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MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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