Clip
June 27, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Marilu Henner, best known for starring on the hit sitcom ‘Taxi,’ joins us with her husband Michael Brown to discuss how they beat Brown’s bladder and lung cancer. And get this: they did it without chemotherapy or radiation. Together, they tell the story in Henner’s new autobiography ‘Changing Normal: How I Helped My Husband Beat Cancer.’

Continue Reading

Episode
June 22, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, whether you’re for it or against it, you can’t argue that firearms are a big part of America. But it’s also hard to ignore the fact that they are far too common and easy to obtain. That’s the dialogue that filmmaker Sheldon Candis is trying to start with his new documentary Who Will Survive America which follows his journey to legally purchase a gun. He talks to us about the film, its takeaway, and how he felt going through the gun-buying process. Then finally, according to statistics, 80 percent of teens and young adults have been kicked out of their homes because of their sexuality, and a staggering 60 percent of that demographic is African American. Former NFL player, Wade Davis has become an advocate for LGBT equality and acceptance after revealing he was gay after retiring from the football field. He takes us inside the struggle of being young, black, and gay, and explains how he’s helping these LGBT community members with his organization, the You Can Play Project.

Continue Reading

Clip
June 21, 2016 at 6:28 pm

According to statistics, 80 percent of teens and young adults have been kicked out of their homes because of their sexuality, and a staggering 60 percent of that demographic is African American. Former NFL player, Wade Davis has become an advocate for LGBT equality and acceptance after revealing he was gay after retiring from the football field. He takes us inside the struggle of being young, black, and gay, and explains how he’s helping these LGBT community members with his organization, the You Can Play Project.

Continue Reading

Episode
June 15, 2016 at 5:36 am

Tonight, it’s Gay Pride month, and while New York City is preparing to celebrate with an array of events, many people are paying tribute to those who lost their lives this weekend in Orlando. Since news of the tragedy broke, crowds of people have been gathered outside of the iconic Stonewall Inn to hold vigil and remember the victims. Last night, New York City Council Member Corey Johnson joined mourners to help them cope and grieve over the tragedy. Tonight, he’ll be with us to talk about the LGBT community and discuss how the city will continue to pay homage to the victims as they celebrate this month. Next, investigations of Sunday’s attack in Orlando have revealed that the gunman, Omar Mateen, was previously questioned by the FBI for making inflammatory comments to co-workers in 2013 and for having possible connections to an American suicide bomber in 2014. The agency closed both investigations, finding that Mateen was not a threat at that time. Now questions are swirling about what law enforcement might have missed leading up to the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. Former Director of Central Intelligence James Woolsey joins us to explain the challenges facing investigators as they track suspected ISIS supporters, and how Mateen could have carried out an attack of this magnitude, undetected. Finally, we’ve all heard of smart phones but what about “smart guns”? So-called “smart gun” technology is actually not a thing of the future. It’s here already, and gun control advocates are continuing to push for more of it following the latest mass shooting in Orlando. Now New York City college students could play a role in improving the technology. As part of a competition rolled out earlier this year, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams is asking students to help design a firearm with a trigger that can only be fired by an authorized user. Adams joins us tonight to talk about his plan and tell us why he’s pushing for “smarter” guns.

Continue Reading

Clip
June 14, 2016 at 6:27 pm

We’ve all heard of smart phones but what about “smart guns”? So-called “smart gun” technology is actually not a thing of the future. It’s here already, and gun control advocates are continuing to push for more of it following the latest mass shooting in Orlando. Now New York City college students could play a role in improving the technology. As part of a competition rolled out earlier this year, Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams is asking students to help design a firearm with a trigger that can only be fired by an authorized user. Adams joins us tonight to talk about his plan and tell us why he’s pushing for “smarter” guns.

Continue Reading

Episode
June 04, 2016 at 6:45 am

Tonight, many lead-foot drivers haven’t been able to pass through a school zone undetected in the five boroughs since the introduction of speed cameras. And depending how you look at it, that might be a good thing, since city hall claims students being hit by cars is the leading cause of injury-related deaths for children under 14. So far, there are 140 of these cameras city-wide, issuing fines at fifty dollars for each offense. Now, lawmakers are looking to add over 2,000 more with the intention to run them 24/7 in order to diminish the amount of students being hit by cars. City Council Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer joins us to discuss why he’s pushing Albany to place these cameras in front of all city schools and to debate the criticism against these cameras. Then, legendary entertainer Michael Feinstein has been dubbed the “Ambassador of the American Songbook,” and we sit down with him to talk about how he is using his talent to further entertain and educate and preserve American music classics. He lets us in on his latest projects in music and art and how they will leave lasting impressions on their audiences.

Continue Reading

Episode
June 03, 2016 at 6:41 am

Tonight, New York City food pantries have been running dry and that’s on top of Mayor DeBlasio proposing further funding cuts in his preliminary fiscal budget. Now, the organization Food Bank For New York City is asking the mayor to up funding from $8.2 million to $22 million in order to support the emergency food assistance program. The Vice President for Research and Public Affairs for this organization, Triada Stampas, sits down with us to explain the strain budget cuts have put on the city’s food banks and pantries and how they are working with the Mayor and city council to rectify the issue. We’re also joined by 69-year-old Myriam Rias. She’s worked her entire life but is still dependent on these pantries to feed her family. She offers us her thoughts on the impact further cuts will have on her livelihood and health. Next, he made millions building and selling tech companies and now he’s a star investor, swimming with the sharks on ABC’s hit show Shark Tank. Robert Herjavec, in his new book You Don’t Have to Be A Shark: Creating Your Own Success, draws from his life experiences to share tips on how you too can strike it rich using the skills you didn’t know you had. Then finally, you may know her as Thelma Harper in the hit ’80’s sitcom Mama’s Family but she’s also an alum of The Carol Burnett Show. Tonight, Vicki Lawrence is here reminiscing about some classic moments from The Carol Burnett Show ahead of the upcoming PBS special Carol Burnett’s Favorite Sketches where comedy legend Carol Burnett walks us through the stories behind some of her favorite scenes.

Continue Reading

Episode
June 01, 2016 at 12:42 pm

The year was 1964. Kitty Genovese, a 28-year-old bar manager, was on her way home from work when she was attacked, raped and murdered. Her cries rang out through a sleepy Queens neighborhood. Legend has it that as many as 38 people heard what was going on and did nothing to stop it. That story soon spread around the world, but is that what really happened? Forget what you think you know because tonight we go inside the case with Kitty’s brother, William Genovese, who has made it his personal mission to set the record straight. Genovese is now the star of a documentary about his sister’s murder called The Witness, and he stops by along with the film’s director to talk about the case and its lasting impact on New York City. Next, nearly two weeks after her murder, Kitty Genovese was on her way to becoming just another victim in New York City where hundreds of people are killed every year. But a lunchtime sit-down between the police commissioner and a New York Times editor quickly changed just that. The newspaper ran a story reporting that 38 people had watched as a killer stalked and stabbed Genovese. Years later The New York Times corrected its reporting to say that many facts in the report were not true, but the impact of that original article still shapes public perception of the case today. Tonight, we dissect where the media went wrong and the evolution of the false narrative with investigative journalist and author Diane Dimond. Then finally, despite the urban legend surrounding Kitty Genovese’s murder, her case continues to be studied because of the reportedly large number of people who failed to come to her aid that lonely night. That behavioral reaction has come to be known as “The Bystander Effect” or “Kitty Genovese Syndrome.” Kitty Genovese authority and Fordham University professor Harold Takooshian joins us to discuss what could have happened that night and he’ll show us firsthand, through experiments staged on the streets of New York City, how “The Bystander Effect” or “Kitty Genovese Syndrome” can take hold.

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

WNET

© 2016 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019