Episode
October 12, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, as time ticks away, the Trump and Clinton campaigns become more and more about numbers, but events from both sides of the aisle this weekend have caused public opinion to sway. Between the release of a 2005 recording of Donald Trump making lewd comments about women and a press conference with women who have accused Bill Clinton of sexual misconduct, everything seemed to come to a head at the second presidential debate on Sunday night. The drama escalated as each candidate took aggressive swipes at each other on every topic possible. As the dust settles from a turbulent weekend in politics, many in the Republican Party are turning their backs on their own nominee, Donald Trump, even going as far as urging him to bow out. All these events have affected the standings of both candidates, but they each seem determined to see this race through to the end. Tonight, we speak to political writer Harry Enten from his headquarters at 538, to update you on everything you need to know from this constantly-changing race to the White House.

Next, if this past Sunday’s presidential debate is any indicator, the presidential race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton could be one of the most contentious in modern times. But what does it take to run for the most powerful office in the world? The Contenders: 16 for ’16 is a PBS series that looks at the most compelling and influential presidential campaigns of the past fifty years using first-hand accounts from many former presidential hopefuls, from Jesse Jackson and Howard Dean to Gary Hart and Pat Buchanan. Carlos Watson, host of The Contenders: 16 for ’16 and editor of OZY Media, takes us inside the next episode titled “The Conservatives,” airing tonight at 8 p.m. on Thirteen, which explores the campaigns of Barry Goldwater, the Republican nominee in the 1964 election, and President Ronald Reagan.

Then, tonight marks the beginning of Yom Kippur, the Jewish ‘Day of Atonement.’ In honor of the reverent holiday, we bring you a unique story in Jewish history that would have been largely forgotten if not for a Catholic priest. Father Patrick Desbois spent over a decade traveling across Eastern Europe in search of mass graves used by Nazi Germany killing squads to bury some 2 million Jews — roughly a third of those who died during the Holocaust. We sit down with Desbois to talk about his work and his goal: to learn from the past and stop this kind of genocide from happening again.

Finally, while New York is working on completing the Second Avenue subway line and Williamsburg prepares for the impending shutdown of the L train, London has embarked on a massive transit project of its own. The Crossrail Project is a super tunnel that will connect one end of London to the other and create 26 miles of new tunnels and connections to existing infrastructure. For the jam-packed, centuries-old city, this feat is no easy task and is filled with challenges and hazards at every turn. A new Nova documentary called Super Tunnel takes its audience underground to explain the importance of the new line while exploring risks this project poses to the city’s existing infrastructure. Tonight, NOVA Senior Producer Chris Schmidt takes us inside the film and gives us an exclusive look at Europe’s largest construction project.

Continue Reading

Clip
October 11, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Tonight marks the beginning of Yom Kippur, the Jewish ‘Day of Atonement.’ In honor of the reverent holiday, we bring you a unique story in Jewish history that would have been largely forgotten if not for a Catholic priest. Father Patrick Desbois spent over a decade traveling across Eastern Europe in search of mass graves used by Nazi Germany killing squads to bury some 2 million Jews — roughly a third of those who died during the Holocaust. We sit down with Desbois to talk about his work and his goal: to learn from the past and stop this kind of genocide from happening again.

Continue Reading

Episode
October 06, 2016 at 10:55 am

What better way to celebrate the birth of America than with Hamilton: an American Musical ? While the musical may chronicle the beginning of American history, the musical and it’s creator, Lin Manuel Miranda, have been makinghistory with this groundbreaking musical. With more than $60 million dollars in ticket sales, a Pulitzer prize, a Grammy, and a whopping 11 Tony Awards, it seems the world just can’t get enough of the famous founding father’s story. Tonight, we take a look at the bestselling book that goes into the making of the hip-hop musical and the Broadway revolution called Hamilton.

Find out where you can catch the hottest Hamilton fan experience in town, where you can get tickets to this sold out show, and for a special cast performance footage, check out our Metrofocus Extra! on Metrofocus.org

Continue Reading

Episode
September 28, 2016 at 5:29 am

Tonight, as the reviews roll in on both candidates from last night’s presidential debate, many believe Hillary Clinton walked away with a clear win. Among Hillary supporters, the verdict is that Trump seemed ill-prepared next to the calm, collected Clinton. Meanwhile, former New York mayor turned Trump advisor, Rudy Giuliani, placed the blame for Trump’s shortcomings on the moderator, Lester Holt. And still, some are calling the whole thing a draw between the Democratic and GOP candidate. Tonight, political analyst for Rasmussen Reports Amy Holmes and former Newsday columnist Ellis Henican join us to break down last night’s debate, give you the highlights, and offer some insights of their own.
Next, yesterday’s presidential debate promised to be a showdown for the ages and to a large extent, it delivered, with the candidates more or less laying out their respective cases amid numerous interruptions and the occasional name-calling. But what did audiences take away from the debate? ABC News correspondent and Intelligence Squared U.S. moderator John Donvan shares results from a debate viewing party hosted by Intelligence Squared and looks at whether last night’s event was any indicator that a new format is needed for future presidential debates.
Then finally, as the news crews pack up to go home and Hofstra University attempts to resume some semblance of normal college life, we hear once again from the students themselves. It seems to be the consensus among the youth at Hofstra that though excitement and Hofstra pride is still high, students are disappointed that the candidates failed to address the issues that affect them, most importantly student debt. Tonight, students and journalists for Hofstra’s Debate TV, Michael Fuller and Megan McGuire follow up with more about the energy on campus and what their peers are taking away from the experience.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 27, 2016 at 6:27 pm

As the news crews pack up to go home and Hofstra University attempts to resume some semblance of normal college life, we hear once again from the students themselves. It seems to be the consensus among the youth at Hofstra that though excitement and Hofstra pride is still high, students are disappointed that the candidates failed to address the issues that affect them, most importantly student debt. Tonight, students and journalists for Hofstra’s Debate TV, Michael Fuller and Megan McGuire follow up with more about the energy on campus and what their peers are taking away from the experience.

Continue Reading

Episode
September 24, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, Monday’s presidential debate has all the makings of something we’ve never seen before in modern politics. But beyond the expected hyperbolic verbal-sparring, will there be anything of substance that American voters will get out of the showdown? Intelligence Squared U.S., a nonpartisan organization whose goal is to raise the level of public discourse in the United States, wants to make sure there is. The organization has planned a handful of their own debates, including a viewing party at Lincoln Center following the first presidential debate that will have the audience analyze the showdown and discuss the way we debate in the U.S. ABC News correspondent and Intelligence Squared moderator John Donvan joins us once again with his take on what debates should look like versus what we may see this Monday.

Next, as November quickly approaches, the race for the White House is heating up. As the gap between the candidates narrows, the focus has fallen on obtaining the millennial vote, which is sure to be a priority as they prepare for the first debate at Hofstra. What can we expect from this coming debate and what do Trump and Clinton need to do to appeal to younger voters? We talk directly to the students at Hofstra University for the answers. Host of Hofstra University’s Debate TV Michael Fuller and production student for the show Megan McGuire join us to give us a preview of what’s to come as the nation waits in anticipation for their school to take the national stage next week.

Then finally, this Sunday, some of music’s biggest names will come together here in New York City for “The Concert Across America to End Gun Violence.” Artists such as Jackson Browne, Eddie Vedder, and Marc Cohn will perform at the Beacon Theatre and at 350 other venues across the United States in remembrance of victims of gun violence and to raise awareness for sensible gun laws during this election season. Among those lending their voice to the cause and concert is singer, songwriter, author, and daughter of the late Johnny Cash, Rosanne Cash. She joins us tonight to talk about the concert, its cause, and how she hopes to make a change.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 23, 2016 at 6:28 pm

As November quickly approaches, the race for the White House is heating up. As the gap between the candidates narrows, the focus has fallen on obtaining the millennial vote, which is sure to be a priority as they prepare for the first debate at Hofstra. What can we expect from this coming debate and what do Trump and Clinton need to do to appeal to younger voters? We talk directly to the students at Hofstra University for the answers. Host of Hofstra University’s Debate TV Michael Fuller and production student for the show Megan McGuire join us to give us a preview of what’s to come as the nation waits in anticipation for their school to take the national stage next week.

Continue Reading

Episode
September 22, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, New Yorkers are always on the move, but one man in East Harlem refuses to move out of his apartment. Raymond Tirado is just one man out of the countless people who are worried about being pushed out of their neighborhood as New York City’s next gentrification project heats up. But while Mayor De Blasio has pledged to preserve and build affordable housing to ensure low-income residents of the area aren’t priced out, Raymond Tirado is digging in his heels and fighting to stay in the home he grew up in. Tirado, the subject of a documentary Last Tenant Standing in East Harlem, joins us with the film’s director, Andrew Padilla, to discuss the issue and how these projects affect other native New Yorkers.

Next, basketball legend and NBA star Shaquille O’Neal retired from the game after 19 seasons, but his name is still greatly revered in the world of basketball. The 7′ 1″ New Jersey native attributes his success on and off the court to the support and values instilled in him while he was young. Recently, he returned to his hometown of Newark to give back to the Boys and Girls Club on Avon Avenue where his story started. NJTV’s Michael Hill caught up with O’Neal at the Boys and Girls Club and asked him what it meant to him to have a place to go to when he was a kid and how he’s giving back. And don’t forget to log on to MetroFocus.org tonight to see the extended interview!

Then finally, young musicians came together from East End Arts Student Orchestra and The Perlman Music Program to harmonize in their fifth annual joint performance on eastern Long Island. East End Arts is an art education nonprofit based in Riverhead, and The Perlman Music Program is a training and mentorship program on Shelter Island founded by Toby Perlman, wife of violin viruoso Itzhak Perlman. Each group runs summer programs for young musicians from nearby and abroad. MetroFocus’ Andrea Vasquez was there as these classical musicians performed, and she gives us a behind-the-scenes look at the powerful music they create together.

Continue Reading

Clip
September 21, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Basketball legend and NBA star Shaquille O’Neal retired from the game after 19 seasons, but his name is still greatly revered in the world of basketball. The 7′ 1″ New Jersey native attributes his success on and off the court to the support and values instilled in him while he was young. Recently, he returned to his hometown of Newark to give back to the Boys and Girls Club on Avon Avenue where his story started. NJTV’s Michael Hill caught up with O’Neal at the Boys and Girls Club and asked him what it meant to him to have a place to go to when he was a kid and how he’s giving back. And don’t forget to log on to MetroFocus.org tonight to see the extended interview!

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, Ellen and James S. Marcus, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross.

WNET

© 2017 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019