Episode
February 17, 2016 at 3:55 am

On July 23rd, 2007, two ex-convicts entered the Connecticut home of Dr. William Petit and killed and tortured his wife and two young daughters. Petit was nearly bludgeoned to death but managed to escape. Eight years later, Ryan D’Agostino captures Petit’s story of tragedy and survival in his new book, “The Rising: Murder, Heartbreak, and the Power of Human Resilience in an American Town.” The author joins us tonight. Travel was often perilous and unwelcoming for African Americans prior to 1964, but that’s where the “The Negro Motorist Green Book,” became vital, with suggestions for places to eat, stay and refuel that would be safe and welcoming for black travelers. To preserve this important piece of history, the New York Public Library is making 30 years of the travel guide available for free digitally on its website. MetroFocus Host Jenna Flanagan takes us within the archives to learn about the origin of the Green Book and its journey to the web. Curious about the grid that New York City was built on in the 19th century? Historian and author of “City on a Grid: How New York Became New York,” Gerard Koeppel walks us through the origin’s of our city’s road network and the debate over whether it was effective. Russell Simmons, co-Founder of Def Jam Records, activist and author, joins us for the first of a two-part interview to talk about his new book, ‘The Happy Vegan,’ which serves as a guide to conscious eating, veganism and the benefits of healthy living.

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February 16, 2016 at 6:32 pm

Travel was often perilous and unwelcoming for African Americans prior to 1964, but that’s where the “The Negro Motorist Green Book,” became vital, with suggestions for places to eat, stay and refuel that would be safe and welcoming for black travelers. To preserve this important piece of history, the New York Public Library is making 30 years of the travel guide available for free digitally on its website. MetroFocus Host Jenna Flanagan takes us within the archives to learn about the origin of the Green Book and its journey to the web.

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Episode
February 16, 2016 at 3:15 pm

Politico New York’s Azi Paybarah joins us to discuss Michael Bloomberg’s consideration to make an independent run for the presidency. See how the former New York City mayor might shake up the polls in this year’s election. Emmy Award-winning filmmaker and director Stanley Nelson stops by to talk about his new documentary “The Black Panthers: Vanguard of the Revolution.” Nelson explains how his perception of the group changed after making the film and draws parallels between the Black Panthers and the social justice movements we are witnessing today. Today’s students are overscheduled, overtested, underestimated, according to filmmaker, author and education advocate Vicki Abeles. She explores the issue in her new book “Beyond Measure: Rescuing an Overscheduled, Overtested, Underestimated Generation,” and stops by to share her opinions on the challenges kids face in school and what she thinks can be done to help.

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February 15, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Today’s students are overscheduled, overtested, underestimated, according to filmmaker, author and education advocate Vicki Abeles. She explores the issue in her new book “Beyond Measure: Rescuing an Overscheduled, Overtested, Underestimated Generation,” and stops by to share her opinions on the challenges kids face in school and what she thinks can be done to help.

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Episode
February 13, 2016 at 4:42 pm

In the second installment of a two-part interview and as part of our ongoing American Graduate series, NYS Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia discusses receivership and her request for more education funding. As part of our ongoing American Graduate series, we take a look at Mott Haven Academy, which aims to help educate children in foster care or the welfare system. Charlie Todd, the founder of Improv Everywhere and mastermind behind the “No Pants Subway Ride” prank, stops by to explain where the stunt started and what these viral jokes are trying to achieve.

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February 12, 2016 at 3:57 pm

Say hi to this eighth-grader participating in an active arts class. He and his older classmates are hanging out with a first-grade class at a Lower Manhattan school. You’ll notice he’s not wearing the school uniform. That’s because he goes to a different school for students on the autism spectrum. As part of the Marquis Inclusion Program, he and his […]

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MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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