Episode
July 21, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, the GOP Convention heads into Day 3 as the focus shifts to opportunity and prosperity, and we continue to keep you updated on the highlights. Tonight, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, Texas Senator Ted Cruz, Eric Trump, and Indiana Governor and presumptive Republican vice-presidential nominee Mike Pence are set to speak. New York State Senator and alternate at-large delegate Thomas Croci sits down with us to talk about what’s been going on in Cleveland, and what is to come.

Next, today is the 47th anniversary since the first man walked on the moon. That first man might have been Neil Armstrong, but tonight, we talk to the man who was just a few steps behind him. Astronaut Buzz Aldrin continues to explore and advocate for space travel decades after the Apollo 11 mission landed him on the moon in 1969. We meet Aldrin in the Space Shuttle Pavilion on the deck of the Intrepid Museum where he opens up with us about his famous journey, and talks about the lessons he’s sharing in his new book No Dream is Too High: Life Lessons From a Man Who Walked On The Moon.

Then finally, growing up, most of what kids know is the world right outside their doorstep, but ABC News veteran Melvin McCray is trying to broaden the horizons of student journalists through the lens of a camera. McCray created and directs the Digital Media Training Program in Harlem where he hopes to teach students video reporting skills so they can better understand the communities they live in and tell the stories that are important to them. Nathalie Cabrera, a student reporter in the program, is covering the ongoing Boko Haram tragedy in Africa. But it turns out that what seems like a situation half a world away still impacts New York City. Melvin McCray and Nathalie Cabrera stop by to discuss the program and how Cabrera’s project relates back to our larger community here.

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July 20, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Growing up, most of what kids know is the world right outside their doorstep, but ABC News veteran Melvin McCray is trying to broaden the horizons of student journalists through the lens of a camera. McCray created and directs the Digital Media Training Program in Harlem where he hopes to teach students video reporting skills so they can better understand the communities they live in and tell the stories that are important to them. Nathalie Cabrera, a student reporter in the program, is covering the ongoing Boko Haram tragedy in Africa. But it turns out that what seems like a situation half a world away still impacts New York City. Melvin McCray and Nathalie Cabrera stop by to discuss the program and how Cabrera’s project relates back to our larger community here.

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Episode
July 08, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, former Fox News anchor Gretchen Carlson filed a sexual harassment claim against her former boss Roger Ailes, one of the most powerful media executives in America. Tonight, Gretchen gets real and shares in detail about her past personal journey as the victim of the sexual assault she was subjected to as she built her early career in television. Next, every June, the New York Yankees reach out to shine a spotlight on five people, families, or organizations that are giving back to the community and impacting them in a positive way. This year, one of the honorees Alvin Irby has been recognized for starting a non-profit called Barbershop Books, which helps young boys connect and get excited about reading. We were invited to help tell that story and get in on the fun as a group of school children were surprised by several Yankee players at a Harlem Bookshop. Then, more and more families are turning to New York City’s homeless shelters as an affordable housing crisis grips the region. In fact, the city’s 2016 Social Indicators Report shows that nearly 65,000 people entered city homeless shelters in 2015, and more than two thirds were families with children. Now, the NYC Department of Social Services has partnered with WNET Public Media to open a children’s waiting room in the homeless services intake center. MetroFocus contributor Andrea Vasquez takes us to the new space, designed to let children play and learn while their parents undergo the long process of entering the homeless system. Finally, every once in a while, a band comes together and redefines an entire genre of music that influences a generation. In the 50’s, there was the Four Seasons, in the 60’s there was the Beatles, and in the 70’s there was the Ramones, and they took punk to another level. The band took shape in Forest Hills, Queens, and their 1976 debut album titled simply “The Ramones” launched a career that spanned two decades. Although the four original Ramones from Forest Hills have since passed away, their music and their fans live on. Now, the Queens Museum is displaying their art and other memorabilia in an exhibit called “Hey! Ho! Let’s Go: The Ramones and the Birth of Punk.” We take you through the exhibit and talk about the illustrious career of these punk rockers.

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July 07, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Every June, the New York Yankees reach out to shine a spotlight on five people, families, or organizations that are giving back to the community and impacting them in a positive way. This year, one of the honorees Alvin Irby has been recognized for starting a non-profit called Barbershop Books, which helps young boys connect and get excited about reading. We were invited to help tell that story and get in on the fun as a group of school children were surprised by several Yankee players at a Harlem Bookshop.

Continue Reading

Clip
July 07, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Every once in a while, a band comes together and redefines an entire genre of music that influences a generation. In the 50’s, there was the Four Seasons, in the 60’s there was the Beatles, and in the 70’s there was the Ramones, and they took punk to another level. The band took shape in Forest Hills, Queens, and their 1976 debut album titled simply “The Ramones” launched a career that spanned two decades. Although the four original Ramones from Forest Hills have since passed away, their music and their fans live on. Now, the Queens Museum is displaying their art and other memorabilia in an exhibit called “Hey! Ho! Let’s Go: The Ramones and the Birth of Punk.” We take you through the exhibit and talk about the illustrious career of these punk rockers.

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Episode
July 06, 2016 at 5:30 am

Have you ever heard of the expression ‘mob shaming?’ It’s formal definition is “a large group or crowd of people who are angry or difficult to control. Mob shaming has happened since the beginning of civilization and with the invention of social media and the internet, a cyber mob can dole out more damage than the stereotypical torch-and-pitchforks horde. It’s hard to imagine being the subject of such hate, but one 18-year-old, Tyler Clementi, didn’t have to. Clementi was a talented violinist and a freshman at Rutgers University when he was outed by his college roommate as gay by having an intimate encounter secretly streamed live not only to the entire campus, but to the world via Twitter. He experienced it, paid the ultimate price for it, and remains an example of not only how mob shaming can affect a person, but the struggles that LGBT youth face. Now, Tyler Clementi’s mother, Jane, and older brother, James, join us to talk about their personal tragedy and how they turned his death into something powerful.

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Episode
July 02, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, every weekday over 200,000 people use the “L” train to shuttle between Brooklyn and Manhattan, and now, talks of a shutdown could mean that all of them would need to find another way to get around. The reason? The tunnel linking the two boroughs has needed repairs since Superstorm Sandy flooded the city in 2012. And while another option is on the table, that plan would take twice as long as a full tunnel shutdown and drastically reduce service on one of the city’s busiest subway lines. Vincent Barone, a transportation reporter for amNewYork, is on top of this story and joins us tonight to break down both options and tell us what a shutdown could mean for the city.

Next, the Orlando massacre was a harrowing reminder of the legitimate safety fears that members of the LGBT community face every day. For LGBT youth, these alarming challenges of harassment, abuse, and bullying can be part of their daily lives as they go to school. Research shows that more than 81 percent of LGBT youth reported being harassed because of their sexual orientation. Now, New York City’s Department of Education has taken an important step in providing positive and supportive school environments for LGBT students. For the first time, the department is hiring an LGBT community liaison to facilitate making schools an inclusive space for these students and developing an LGBT curriculum for teachers. New York City Council Member Daniel Dromm spearheaded this initiative and he joins us tonight to talk about it.

Finally, Political commentator and #1 New York Times best-selling author Brad Thor has written over 16 books featuring Scot Haravath, a former navy seal turned espionage and counter-terrorism operative. In his latest installment to this thriller series, Foreign Agent, the story continues as Haravath goes on a journey to track down a dangerous terrorist. It’s certainly a story that bears relevance to current events, and Thor is with us today to talk about the Orlando terror attacks, his latest novel, and to speak on some controversial statements he made on the Glenn Beck Show

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Clip
July 01, 2016 at 6:28 pm

The Orlando massacre was a harrowing reminder of the legitimate safety fears that members of the LGBT community face every day. For LGBT youth, these alarming challenges of harassment, abuse, and bullying can be part of their daily lives as they go to school. Research shows that more than 81 percent of LGBT youth reported being harassed because of their sexual orientation. Now, New York City’s Department of Education has taken an important step in providing positive and supportive school environments for LGBT students. For the first time, the department is hiring an LGBT community liaison to facilitate making schools an inclusive space for these students and developing an LGBT curriculum for teachers. New York City Council Member Daniel Dromm spearheaded this initiative and he joins us tonight to talk about it.

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Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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