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June 02, 2016 at 6:27 pm

He made millions building and selling tech companies and now he’s a star investor, swimming with the sharks on ABC’s hit show Shark Tank. Robert Herjavec, in his new book You Don’t Have to Be A Shark: Creating Your Own Success, draws from his life experiences to share tips on how you too can strike it rich using the skills you didn’t know you had.

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Episode
May 27, 2016 at 5:58 am

The battlefield is not the last place where our troops face combat. For many veterans who return from the trials of war, they can be locked in an ongoing struggle with their own minds that can lead to drugs or suicide just to quell their suffering. The new POV documentary Of Men and War, which premieres May 30 at 10pm on PBS, follows the grueling journey of returning soldiers and their families at The Pathway Home in California, where they are set on their own path to recovering from PTSD and the emotional pain of their memories. Next, the public four-year high school graduation rate for New York City students has recently hit a high of 70 percent, and although that number may not sound like much, it is 2 percentage points higher than the previous year. As part of our ongoing initiative, Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America, we spotlight one Harlem school who has proved that the average is not the norm. At the St. Aloysius School in Harlem, students go on to graduate from high school at a rate of 96 percent. But that success may soon be cut short because the school, which has been a fixture in the community for 76 years, will be forced to close its doors for good. If St. Aloysius cannot reach its fundraising goals by next month, the community will lose this Harlem beacon of hope forever. Then finally, they were called the Mount Rushmore of country music. In 1985, Johnny Cash, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings and Kris Kristofferson formed the greatest country-western music super group of all time: The Highwaymen. Their legendary story is the subject of the new American Masters documentary The Highwaymen: Friends Till the End which premieres May 27 at 9pm on PBS. Country music artist Jessi Colter, who was married to Waylon Jennings, shines light on the lasting impact of the iconic quartet.

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May 26, 2016 at 6:27 pm

The public four-year high school graduation rate for New York City students has recently hit a high of 70 percent, and although that number may not sound like much, it is 2 percentage points higher than the previous year. As part of our ongoing initiative, Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America, we spotlight one Harlem school who has proved that the average is not the norm. At the St. Aloysius School in Harlem, students go on to graduate from high school at a rate of 96 percent. But that success may soon be cut short because the school, which has been a fixture in the community for 76 years, will be forced to close its doors for good. If St. Aloysius cannot reach its fundraising goals by next month, the community will lose this Harlem beacon of hope forever.

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Episode
May 25, 2016 at 5:59 am

Trailer parks. Beyond the stigma and the stereotypes, for families who can’t afford a traditional home, they can be a lifeline worth fighting for. That’s why neighbors from a Long Island trailer park in Nassau County recently banded together to stave off eviction and save their homes. Their struggle is the subject of a Newsday documentary, The Last Trailer Park. Tonight, as part of our ongoing initiative, “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” we take a look at the film and speak with its producer. Then tonight, we also delve into an epidemic impacting thousands of Americans across the Tri-State every year: eviction. Harvard University professor Matthew Desmond gives us a firsthand look at the harsh realities of living in a trailer park. The sociologist made one his home for about half a year and watched as families were evicted and forced into shelters. Desmond took thousands of pages of notes as he chronicled their stories. That research has been called “the most comprehensive, detailed data on American urban poverty, housing and eviction” and is now the foundation of his book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.

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May 24, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Trailer parks. Beyond the stigma and the stereotypes, for families who can’t afford a traditional home, they can be a lifeline worth fighting for. That’s why neighbors from a Long Island trailer park in Nassau County recently banded together to stave off eviction and save their homes. Their struggle is the subject of a Newsday documentary, The Last Trailer Park. Tonight, as part of our ongoing initiative, “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” we take a look at the film and speak with its producer.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 24, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Tonight, we also delve into an epidemic impacting thousands of Americans across the Tri-State every year: eviction. Harvard University professor Matthew Desmond gives us a firsthand look at the harsh realities of living in a trailer park. The sociologist made one his home for about half a year and watched as families were evicted and forced into shelters. Desmond took thousands of pages of notes as he chronicled their stories. That research has been called “the most comprehensive, detailed data on American urban poverty, housing and eviction” and is now the foundation of his book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.

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Episode
May 21, 2016 at 5:59 am

She was one of the more than fifty women featured in The New York Times’ recent expose about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s treatment of women. Barbara Res was the lead engineer on the Trump Tower project, and now she’s sharing her experience working for the billionaire businessman. In light of some of Trump’s more controversial comments, how does she feel about her former boss seeking the highest office? Earlier this month, the New York state legislature passed a bill to raise New York’s minimum wage from $9 an hour to as much as $15 an hour. But how much you make may all depend on where you live in New York. Upstate workers will only reach $12.50 an hour, and that increase won’t be met until 2021. Though the legislation has been hailed as a victory by many in the state and around the country, for some low wage earners and small business owners, the pay increase comes with a dose of uncertainty. Jenna Flanagan has the story. Next, for 70 years, the non–profit Northside Center for Child Development in New York City has been an important resource for making sure children and families that are touched by mental illness have access to the support, acceptance and enrichment they deserve. For National Mental Health Awareness Month, ABC News correspondent and anchor Deborah Roberts, who supports the non-profit, and Dr. Thelma Dye, the center’s executive director, share how they are working to overcome the stigmas associated with mental health conditions. Then finally,over the course of a handful of months, New York Magazine reporters went to one block in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn. They knocked on every door, crashed the block party, and hunted through public records to track down and interview over sixty current and former block residents. The results not only revealed the transformation of the people there, but also the history of a single neighborhood over the past 135 years. Senior Editor of New York Magazine Genevieve Smith shares their story.

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May 20, 2016 at 6:28 pm

She was one of the more than fifty women featured in The New York Times’ recent expose about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s treatment of women. Barbara Res was the lead engineer on the Trump Tower project, and now she’s sharing her experience working for the billionaire businessman. In light of some of Trump’s more controversial comments, how does she feel about her former boss seeking the highest office?

Continue Reading

Clip
May 20, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Earlier this month, the New York state legislature passed a bill to raise New York’s minimum wage from $9 an hour to as much as $15 an hour. But how much you make may all depend on where you live in New York. Upstate workers will only reach $12.50 an hour, and that increase won’t be met until 2021. Though the legislation has been hailed as a victory by many in the state and around the country, for some low wage earners and small business owners, the pay increase comes with a dose of uncertainty. Jenna Flanagan has the story.

Continue Reading

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MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross, and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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