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August 16, 2016 at 6:28 pm

It was the news no New York City straphanger wanted to hear. The L train, one of the busiest subway lines in the world, is shutting down between Manhattan and Brooklyn for 18 months starting in 2019. The MTA reached that decision earlier this summer as it tries to repair a Superstorm Sandy-damaged tunnel that connects the two boroughs. Now, hundreds of thousands of riders will need to find a different way of commuting. Vin Barone, a transportation reporter for amNewYork, has been following the story closely and takes us inside the impending shutdown.

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August 16, 2016 at 6:26 pm

With a growing number of states establishing medical marijuana programs, in addition to the four states that have legalized recreational use of the drug, a new sector of unexplored business opportunities is emerging. Entrepreneurs, policy makers, and advocates came together to paint New York City green and make sense of this new money-making opportunity at the third annual Cannabis World Congress and Business Exposition. Is cannabis prohibition coming to an end, or will political forces work to ensure former policies surrounding the drug? MetroFocus contributor Andrea Vasquez has your inside look at the Cannabis Expo held at the Jacob Javits Center.

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Episode
August 13, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, fracking: Some say that this energy revolution is turning scarcity into abundance in America, which is giving us energy independence like never before. Furthermore, proponents of fracking say the practice could decrease the price paid for energy, create high paying jobs, and reduce our carbon footprint. But the practice isn’t without its opposition. According to opponents, fracking has negative effects on the health of workers and citizens, damages property, contaminates the environment and even increases earthquake activity. Director Jon Bowermaster presents the arguments surrounding fracking in his new documentary, called “Dear President Obama, The Clean Energy Revolution is Now.” He joins us tonight to talk about the film and the future of clean energy.

Next, about 1.4 million New Yorkers – many of them women, children, elderly and disabled – rely on food pantries and soup kitchens. Tonight’s latest installment of our ongoing reporting initiative, Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America, takes a real look at hunger in our city, and the many New Yorkers who struggle to make ends meet. Photojournalist Joey O’Loughlin spent three years documenting people on food pantry lines around the city, and now some of her portraits are on display at the Brooklyn Historical Society in an exhibit titled “Hidden in Plain Sight: Portraits of Hunger in NYC.” Tonight, we’ll take a look at what O’Loughlin discovered about what the hungry of New York City looks like, and who they are might surprise you.

Finally, how far has the sports world come in terms of LGBT acceptance and equality? Co-Founder of online sports magazine Outsports, expert in LGBTQ athletics, and author of Fair Play: How LGBT Athletes are Claiming Their Rightful Place in Sports, Cyd Ziegler stops by to share his perspective. We’ll take a look at key moments and issues that have transformed sports for today’s LGBT athletes.

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August 12, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Fracking: Some say that this energy revolution is turning scarcity into abundance in America, which is giving us energy independence like never before. Furthermore, proponents of fracking say the practice could decrease the price paid for energy, create high paying jobs, and reduce our carbon footprint. But the practice isn’t without its opposition. According to opponents, fracking has negative effects on the health of workers and citizens, damages property, contaminates the environment and even increases earthquake activity. Director Jon Bowermaster presents the arguments surrounding fracking in his new documentary, called “Dear President Obama, The Clean Energy Revolution is Now.” He joins us tonight to talk about the film and the future of clean energy.

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Clip
August 12, 2016 at 6:28 pm

About 1.4 million New Yorkers – many of them women, children, elderly and disabled – rely on food pantries and soup kitchens. Tonight’s latest installment of our ongoing reporting initiative, Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America, takes a real look at hunger in our city, and the many New Yorkers who struggle to make ends meet. Photojournalist Joey O’Loughlin spent three years documenting people on food pantry lines around the city, and now some of her portraits are on display at the Brooklyn Historical Society in an exhibit titled “Hidden in Plain Sight: Portraits of Hunger in NYC.” Tonight, we’ll take a look at what O’Loughlin discovered about what the hungry of New York City looks like, and who they are might surprise you.

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Episode
August 12, 2016 at 5:32 am

Tonight, after a career boasting 696 home runs, 2,781 games played, and a 12 year-long career with the New York Yankees, Alex Rodriguez will play his last game tomorrow night and then hang up his pinstriped uniform for good. During his time with the Yankees, A-Rod has been one of the most polarizing characters in the game of baseball. But whether you love him or hate him, what will his legacy be? Emmy award-winning sportscaster Len Berman joins us to share his perspective on this Yankee who is considered one of the greatest Major Leaguers.

Next, it has now been 34 years since Kathleen Durst, first wife to real estate heir and suspected serial killer Robert Durst, disappeared. Former prosecutor Jeanine Pirro picked up the cold case 20 years ago when she was Westchester District Attorney and has made it her mission to bring Robert Durst to justice for the murders not only of his wife Kathleen, but also of his neighbor and a longtime friend. Now, after the release of HBO’s The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst, Fox News host Judge Jeanine Pirro joins us to discuss her personal and professional relationship with this case and her book He Killed Them All.

Finally, if you were a millionaire, what would you spend your money on? For some New Yorkers, that’s no fantasy, but they’re not looking to spend their cash on themselves. Filmmaker and CEO of Fork Films Abigail Disney, along with fifty other millionaires in New York, signed a document proposing a plan to Governor Andrew Cuomo that would increase taxes on upper-income New Yorkers. Disney joins us to explain how this plan would work for the state and where they want the money to go.

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Episode
August 10, 2016 at 5:36 am

Tonight, the neighborhood of Chelsea is a neighborhood of sharp contrasts. Home of The High Line, multi-million dollar condos, and tech giants like Google, Chelsea has seen rapid gentrification in the past three decades. And while many residents benefit from the development of the area, some in rent stabilized and public housing continue to struggle as prices and services rise. The New York Times housing reporter Mireya Navarro wrote an article that delved into the gentrification of this neighborhood, the wealth divide, and the anxious people who fear they will be forced out.

Then, he replaced Johnny Carson and made a name for himself on The Tonight Show, and now late-night legend Jay Leno joins us in a one-on-one interview to dish about his time on The Tonight Show, the current state of comedy, his car show Jay Leno’s Garage, and the presidential election. You won’t want to miss it.

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August 09, 2016 at 6:29 pm

The neighborhood of Chelsea is a neighborhood of sharp contrasts. Home of The High Line, multi-million dollar condos, and tech giants like Google, Chelsea has seen rapid gentrification in the past three decades. And while many residents benefit from the development of the area, some in rent stabilized and public housing continue to struggle as prices and services rise. The New York Times housing reporter Mireya Navarro wrote an article that delved into the gentrification of this neighborhood, the wealth divide, and the anxious people who fear they will be forced out.

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Episode
August 05, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, on Tuesday, NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton announced that he will be stepping down from his post next month. We listened in on his press conference where he thanked those who supported him through his 45 year-long career in the public eye. But what lies in store for the New York Police Department after Bratton takes his leave? Journalist Ellis Henican joins us to discuss what’s next for the Big Apple.

Then, Ally Hilfiger’s childhood was not easy despite being the daughter of renowned fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger. Her arduous health ordeal began at the age of seven when she was bitten by a tick. Her test was inconclusive, and for years she dealt with unbearable pain and misdiagnoses- from rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, to fibromyalgia. The pain being too great, Hilfiger says she turned to marijuana for relief. Her habit ultimately led to her being committed to a psychiatric hospital. In her new book Bite Me: How Lyme Disease Stole My Childhood, Made me Crazy, and Almost Killed Me, Hilfiger opens up about her personal battle with Lyme disease, and shares how she hopes to help others.

Finally, it turns out millennials – or those born between 1985 and 1996 – as defined by New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer, are significantly worse off than the generation before them. In fact, the job market they entered several years ago during the Great Recession was similar to that of the Great Depression, or at least according to Scott Stringer. A recent report from his office shows millennials are struggling to make ends meet, earning 20 percent less than their predecessors did in the 1990s. The Comptroller joins us to talk more about his findings and tell us what the city needs to do in order to help this stalled generation.

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Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, Ellen and James S. Marcus, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross.

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