Episode
November 19, 2016 at 8:22 am

Tonight, after multiple setbacks and numerous protests, New York City is pressing play on its body camera program. The NYPD will be moving forward with a $6.4 million contract with the company VieVu to provide cameras and data storage for what would be one of the country’s largest body camera programs. Across the river in New Jersey, another city is already testing out police body cameras: Camden, one of the poorest and most dangerous cities in the country. But now, after decades of economic downturn and violent crime, change is coming with help from the newly formed police force. MetroFocus producer William Jones takes to the streets of Camden, where officers are testing out this new technology to improve policing.

Next, as life expectancy reaches an all-time high, we as a city are aging. More than 1.4 million New Yorkers are 60 years of age or older. By 2030 that number is estimated to swell to more than 1.8 million, or 20% of city residents, raising demand for affordable housing and health and social services. We get a look at how the nonprofit Selfhelp is answering that call, providing care and services to thousands of aging New Yorkers.

Finally, maybe you’ve caught a compelling story on The Moth Radio Hour on WNYC, downloaded a podcast, or been to a live “story-slam”. The Moth has been dedicated to the art of simple storytelling, told live on stage with no script, just a microphone, a spotlight and a room full of strangers. We caught a behind the scenes look at one woman’s personal storytelling journey from the rural mountains of Nepal to women’s health advocate as part of The Moth’s global community program “Women In The World,” recently performed at Jazz At Lincoln Center.

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November 18, 2016 at 6:42 pm

As life expectancy reaches an all-time high, we as a city are aging. More than 1.4 million New Yorkers are 60 years of age or older. By 2030 that number is estimated to swell to more than 1.8 million, or 20% of city residents, raising demand for affordable housing and health and social services. We get a look at how the nonprofit Selfhelp is answering that call, providing care and services to thousands of aging New Yorkers.

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November 18, 2016 at 6:41 pm

Maybe you’ve caught a compelling story on The Moth Radio Hour on WNYC, downloaded a podcast, or been to a live “story-slam”. The Moth has been dedicated to the art of simple storytelling, told live on stage with no script, just a microphone, a spotlight and a room full of strangers. We caught a behind the scenes look at one woman’s personal storytelling journey from the rural mountains of Nepal to women’s health advocate as part of The Moth’s global community program “Women In The World,” recently performed at Jazz At Lincoln Center.

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Episode
November 18, 2016 at 5:46 am

Tonight, Mayor de Blasio and President-Elect Donald Trump met for more than an hour yesterday where they discussed, among many things, Trump’s campaign promise to deport millions of undocumented immigrants, and build a wall along the Mexican border. But what are the realities of his policies, and are the fears of undocumented immigrants legitimate? Michael Wildes, the immigration lawyer who defended the citizenship status of Melania Trump, joins us with his take on the future of immigration under Donald Trump.

Next, we’ve witnessed a significant increase in hate crimes across the country following last week’s election, including here in New York, where Governor Cuomo launched an investigation after swastika graffiti was discovered at student accommodation buildings at SUNY Geneseo. President-Elect Donald Trump has recently confronted the issue on 60 Minutes, but that has done little to assuage the fears of many who have been targeted. We discuss it all with Huffington Post journalist and Muslim-American Rowaida Abdelaziz and New York City Council-member Ritchie Torres.

Then, when natural disaster strikes, one New York-based organization is there to wade through flood waters and dig through debris to save animals. They’re the Guardians of Rescue, but they do much more than just enter disaster zones. Founder Robert Misseri joins us with a look at their mission protecting the well-being of animals in our community that are homeless, helpless and in need of a hug.

Finally, scattered across the five boroughs of New York City are vibrant organizations serving children and adults of all ages and from every walk of life. These are the settlement houses: centers that provide help and new opportunity to our urban population. The new documentary Treasures of New York: Settlement Houses, which airs tonight at 8pm on WLIW, explores how the 130-year old settlement house movement remains integral to New York City.

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November 17, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Scattered across the five boroughs of New York City are vibrant organizations serving children and adults of all ages and from every walk of life. These are the settlement houses: centers that provide help and new opportunity to our urban population. The new documentary Treasures of New York: Settlement Houses, which airs tonight at 8pm on WLIW, explores how the 130-year old settlement house movement remains integral to New York City.

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Episode
November 17, 2016 at 5:15 am

Tonight, Staten Island is ground zero for heroin addiction in New York City. So far, the island alone has seen over 70 suspected heroin related deaths this year. We investigate this growing opioid problem on “Heroin Island” with Staten Island District Attorney Michael E. Mcmahon, who has made combating this crisis a central focus for his office.

Then, with Donald Trump’s unexpected upset victory over Hillary Clinton, there is now a sense of urgency among many Americans to fight for gender equality, regardless of class or race. That fight for women’s freedom is something author Erica Jong has advocated for throughout her long writing career, from her groundbreaking first book Fear of Flying to her recent novel Fear of Dying. Erica Jong joins us to share her thoughts on the factors that truly lead to women’s liberation.

Finally, it’s the story of groundbreaking music-making you don’t want to miss. A new 8-episode PBS series, SOUNDBREAKING: STORIES FROM THE CUTTING EDGE OF RECORDED MUSIC, reveals the innovative changes in studio recording that have driven the evolution of music. Joshua Bennett, one of the series producers, and Hank Shocklee, record producer for the ‘80s and ‘90s hip- hop group Public Enemy join us with an inside look.

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November 16, 2016 at 6:28 pm

With Donald Trump’s unexpected upset victory over Hillary Clinton, there is now a sense of urgency among many Americans to fight for gender equality, regardless of class or race. That fight for women’s freedom is something author Erica Jong has advocated for throughout her long writing career, from her groundbreaking first book Fear of Flying to her recent novel Fear of Dying. Erica Jong joins us to share her thoughts on the factors that truly lead to women’s liberation.

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November 16, 2016 at 6:27 pm

It’s the story of groundbreaking music-making you don’t want to miss. A new 8-episode PBS series, SOUNDBREAKING: STORIES FROM THE CUTTING EDGE OF RECORDED MUSIC, reveals the innovative changes in studio recording that have driven the evolution of music. Joshua Bennett, one of the series producers, and Hank Shocklee, record producer for the ‘80s and ‘90s hip- hop group Public Enemy join us with an inside look.

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Episode
November 05, 2016 at 5:30 am

The verdict is in, and two former members of Governor Chris Christie’s administration were found guilty on all counts related to the 2013 Bridgegate scandal. Bill Baroni and Bridget Anne Kelly were convicted this morning for coordinating the inexplicable closure of toll lanes in New Jersey that caused massive traffic jams on the George Washington Bridge. The transit fiasco was […]

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