Episode
April 26, 2016 at 5:46 am

Republican presidential candidates Ted Cruz and John Kasich team up in an effort to deny Donald Trump the republican presidential nomination, while Hillary Clinton is reportedly scouting for potential running mates. Behind the scenes, Bernie Sanders is pressing for a prominent role in drafting the platform for the Democratic Convention. This all continues to unfold as the candidates prepare to face-off tomorrow in the Connecticut primary. FiveThirtyEight’s senior political writer and analyst Harry Enten joins us with the latest and a look at the significance of the Nutmeg State’s primary. Then, are we safe from another big terrorist attack? Juliette Kayyem, former Assistant Secretary for Homeland Security weighs in on the threat assessment post Paris and Brussels, and speaks candidly on how she balances a life on the front lines of terror and as a mom at home. Next, when school budget cuts come up, arts and music programs can be some of the first on the chopping block. Yet research has shown the positive impact of arts education on children’s overall success in school. A non-profit called ProjectArt provides art classes in public libraries around New York City, in neighborhoods where local schools have had to cut art classes. Finally, Central Park is among New York City’s most famous landmarks. But a nearly bankrupt New York City in the 1970’s saw a city-wide disintegration of park services, which left the park crime-ridden and painted with graffiti. Enter Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, who launched the Central Park Conservancy in the 1980’s and restored the park back to its former glory. Rogers chronicles the development of Central Park and six other of the city’s green treasures in her book, Green Metropolis: The Extraordinary Landscapes of New York City as Nature, History, and Design.

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April 25, 2016 at 6:25 pm

Central Park is among New York City’s most famous landmarks. But a nearly bankrupt New York City in the 1970’s saw a city-wide disintegration of park services, which left the park crime-ridden and painted with graffiti. Enter Elizabeth Barlow Rogers, who launched the Central Park Conservancy in the 1980’s and restored the park back to its former glory. Rogers chronicles the development of Central Park and six other of the city’s green treasures in her book, Green Metropolis: The Extraordinary Landscapes of New York City as Nature, History, and Design.

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Episode
April 23, 2016 at 6:40 am

North Carolina made headlines last month after Governor Pat McCrory signed a bill limiting public restroom access for transgender individuals. This week, a federal appeals court overturned a similar anti-transgender policy at a Virginia high school, which may affect the challenges being made to the North Carolina law. Mitchell Gold, a prominent gay activist and the chairman of North Carolina-based furniture company Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, joins us to discuss North Carolina’s “bathroom bill” and its broader implications. Today is Earth Day, and the anniversary of the birth of the modern environmental movement. We’re getting into the spirit by taking a look at one of New York City’s smelliest treasures. The Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn has earned a reputation for its less-than-glamorous odor. What most people don’t know though, is the role the canal played in famous chapters of American history, including the Revolutionary War and the Industrial Revolution. The author and historian of the book Gowanus: Brooklyn’s Curious Canal digs into the waterway’s past and explores how the canal shaped modern-day Brooklyn. Next, Every day, about one hundred thousand New York City kids make their way through metal detectors on their way to class. Metal detectors in schools have become a prominent security measure not only in New York City, but across the country. While supporters point to dangers they’ve prevented, proponents of their removal claim they make schools feel like prisons. Are they necessary? Greg Floyd, president of Teamsters Local 237, which represents the city’s school safety officers, explores the debate. Finally, exclusive and expensive: two words often synonymous with arts and culture in New York City. But think again. NYC Inspires is a new initiative that seeks to change that perception by making city landmarks more affordable and accessible. The program is set on raising forty million dollars in funding with the aim of getting kids out of the classroom and into some of the cultural treasures across all five boroughs. New York City Council Member and Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer is a supporter, and he explains the importance of having students experience these cultural institutions.

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April 22, 2016 at 6:25 pm

Exclusive and expensive: two words often synonymous with arts and culture in New York City. But think again. NYC Inspires is a new initiative that seeks to change that perception by making city landmarks more affordable and accessible. The program is set on raising forty million dollars in funding with the aim of getting kids out of the classroom and into some of the cultural treasures across all five boroughs. New York City Council Member and Majority Leader Jimmy Van Bramer is a supporter, and he explains the importance of having students experience these cultural institutions.

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Episode
April 21, 2016 at 5:58 am

The polls are closed, and the results are in: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have won the Empire State. Yesterday’s New York primary promised to be a game-changer in the race to the White House, and we explore its impact with the help of The Blaze anchor Amy Holmes, and Mike Morey, a democratic strategist and former communications director for Senator Chuck Schumer. Next, former NYPD officer Peter Liang was convicted by a jury in February for fatally shooting unarmed Akai Gurley. Yesterday, a judge spared him from prison time: reducing that conviction from manslaughter to criminally negligent homicide, and sentencing him to five years’ probation and at least 800 hours of community service. In a MetroFocus exclusive, the family reacts and Akai Gurley’s aunt, Hertencia Petersen, expresses their outrage. She’s joined by amNewYork reporter Alison Fox, who brings us the latest city-wide reaction to the sentencing. Finally, Senator Bernie Sanders is making waves as he goes toe-to-toe with some of America’s biggest corporations, accusing them of “destroying the moral fabric of America.” According to the Democratic presidential candidate, these large companies are guilty of tax avoidance. Douglas Holtz-Eakin, president of the American Action Forum and former chair of the Congressional Budget Office, joins us to share his perspective on the battle that’s brewing.

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April 20, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Senator Bernie Sanders is making waves as he goes toe-to-toe with some of America’s biggest corporations, accusing them of “destroying the moral fabric of America.” According to the Democratic presidential candidate, these large companies are guilty of tax avoidance. Douglas Holtz-Eakin, president of the American Action Forum and former chair of the Congressional Budget Office, joins us to share his perspective on the battle that’s brewing.

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Episode
April 15, 2016 at 5:24 am

We couldn’t have media legend Larry King sit down with us and not discuss Election 2016. King has interviewed just about every major player in politics and media, and he shares his perspective on the candidates and discusses the role of media in shaping the campaign. Next,the cost of living in the state of New York is sky high, so it’s surprising when someone steps up and asks to pay more in taxes. Filmmaker and CEO of Fork Films Abigail Disney, along with fifty other millionaires in New York, signed a document proposing a plan to Governor Andrew Cuomo that would increase taxes on upper-income New Yorkers. Disney joins us to explain how this plan would alleviate the financial burden on the middle class and fund infrastructure and programs for the less fortunate. Finally,
In honor of the Ken Burns latest documentary on baseball legend Jackie Robinson, we talk about the 1964 election and discuss how Jackie went up against GOP candidate Barry Goldwater. And we find out why the icon aligned himself with the Republican party during the Civil Rights movement.

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April 14, 2016 at 6:27 pm

The cost of living in the state of New York is sky high, so it’s surprising when someone steps up and asks to pay more in taxes. Filmmaker and CEO of Fork Films Abigail Disney, along with fifty other millionaires in New York, signed a document proposing a plan to Governor Andrew Cuomo that would increase taxes on upper-income New Yorkers. Disney joins us to explain how this plan would alleviate the financial burden on the middle class and fund infrastructure and programs for the less fortunate.

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Episode
April 09, 2016 at 6:09 am

In the second of a two-part interview, former U.S. Senator and Nebraska Gov. Bob Kerrey discusses why he’s backing Hillary Clinton for president despite being critical of the way in which the former secretary of state handled the turmoil in Libya and her email servers. Kerrey, a Democrat, also explains why he believes Republicans in Congress are failing to do their jobs by refusing to consider President Obama’s nominee to the Supreme Court. Also, PFLAG, the nation’s largest organization for families, friends and allies of the LGBTQ community, honored entertainers, media stars, and businesses at its 8th Annual Straight for Equality Gala. Reporter Andrea Vasquez talked to stars and supporters on the red carpet about the important role of LGBTQ allies in the fight for equal rights. Next, in the second installment of our two-part interview, media mogul, and author of The Sleep Revolution Arianna Huffington tells us how we can all sleep our way to being the best person we can be and how a good dose of rest can transform your life one night at a time. Finally, when Jackie Robinson stepped up to the plate in 1947 and broke Major League Baseball’s color barrier, it was a game-changer for the sport and the country and has since inspired numerous films, books, plays, and songs. Why did Robinson and the rest of the then-Brooklyn Dodgers generate so much passion and what was the impact on American culture? To find out, we sit down with David Krell, journalist and author of Our Bums: The Brooklyn Dodgers in History, Memory and the Popular Culture.

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