Episode
May 25, 2016 at 5:59 am

Trailer parks. Beyond the stigma and the stereotypes, for families who can’t afford a traditional home, they can be a lifeline worth fighting for. That’s why neighbors from a Long Island trailer park in Nassau County recently banded together to stave off eviction and save their homes. Their struggle is the subject of a Newsday documentary, The Last Trailer Park. Tonight, as part of our ongoing initiative, “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” we take a look at the film and speak with its producer. Then tonight, we also delve into an epidemic impacting thousands of Americans across the Tri-State every year: eviction. Harvard University professor Matthew Desmond gives us a firsthand look at the harsh realities of living in a trailer park. The sociologist made one his home for about half a year and watched as families were evicted and forced into shelters. Desmond took thousands of pages of notes as he chronicled their stories. That research has been called “the most comprehensive, detailed data on American urban poverty, housing and eviction” and is now the foundation of his book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 24, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Trailer parks. Beyond the stigma and the stereotypes, for families who can’t afford a traditional home, they can be a lifeline worth fighting for. That’s why neighbors from a Long Island trailer park in Nassau County recently banded together to stave off eviction and save their homes. Their struggle is the subject of a Newsday documentary, The Last Trailer Park. Tonight, as part of our ongoing initiative, “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” we take a look at the film and speak with its producer.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 24, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Tonight, we also delve into an epidemic impacting thousands of Americans across the Tri-State every year: eviction. Harvard University professor Matthew Desmond gives us a firsthand look at the harsh realities of living in a trailer park. The sociologist made one his home for about half a year and watched as families were evicted and forced into shelters. Desmond took thousands of pages of notes as he chronicled their stories. That research has been called “the most comprehensive, detailed data on American urban poverty, housing and eviction” and is now the foundation of his book Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 21, 2016 at 5:59 am

She was one of the more than fifty women featured in The New York Times’ recent expose about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s treatment of women. Barbara Res was the lead engineer on the Trump Tower project, and now she’s sharing her experience working for the billionaire businessman. In light of some of Trump’s more controversial comments, how does she feel about her former boss seeking the highest office? Earlier this month, the New York state legislature passed a bill to raise New York’s minimum wage from $9 an hour to as much as $15 an hour. But how much you make may all depend on where you live in New York. Upstate workers will only reach $12.50 an hour, and that increase won’t be met until 2021. Though the legislation has been hailed as a victory by many in the state and around the country, for some low wage earners and small business owners, the pay increase comes with a dose of uncertainty. Jenna Flanagan has the story. Next, for 70 years, the non–profit Northside Center for Child Development in New York City has been an important resource for making sure children and families that are touched by mental illness have access to the support, acceptance and enrichment they deserve. For National Mental Health Awareness Month, ABC News correspondent and anchor Deborah Roberts, who supports the non-profit, and Dr. Thelma Dye, the center’s executive director, share how they are working to overcome the stigmas associated with mental health conditions. Then finally,over the course of a handful of months, New York Magazine reporters went to one block in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn. They knocked on every door, crashed the block party, and hunted through public records to track down and interview over sixty current and former block residents. The results not only revealed the transformation of the people there, but also the history of a single neighborhood over the past 135 years. Senior Editor of New York Magazine Genevieve Smith shares their story.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 20, 2016 at 6:28 pm

She was one of the more than fifty women featured in The New York Times’ recent expose about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump’s treatment of women. Barbara Res was the lead engineer on the Trump Tower project, and now she’s sharing her experience working for the billionaire businessman. In light of some of Trump’s more controversial comments, how does she feel about her former boss seeking the highest office?

Continue Reading

Clip
May 20, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Earlier this month, the New York state legislature passed a bill to raise New York’s minimum wage from $9 an hour to as much as $15 an hour. But how much you make may all depend on where you live in New York. Upstate workers will only reach $12.50 an hour, and that increase won’t be met until 2021. Though the legislation has been hailed as a victory by many in the state and around the country, for some low wage earners and small business owners, the pay increase comes with a dose of uncertainty. Jenna Flanagan has the story.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 17, 2016 at 5:50 am

Tonight, Amy Goodman, a veteran journalist and host of Democracy Now, breaks down all that is wrong with the media’s coverage of Election 2016, and shares her experiences on the ground covering under-served communities and under-reported stories in her new book Democracy Now: Twenty Years Covering the Movements Changing America. Then, can your trash be another man’s treasure? For some Americans, called Recyclers, gathering bottles, cans and other materials from our nation’s vast rivers of trash is a way of life and their only source of income. In the new documentary Dogtown Redemption, filmmakers Amir Soltani and Chihiro Wimbush chronicle the lives of three recyclers over seven years as they navigate the streets of West Oakland in search of recyclables. Finally, why is a girl from Queens singing country tunes? Cyndi Lauper burst onto the music scene in the 1980’s with the iconic pop song “Girls Just Want To Have Fun” and has covered everything from Rock and Roll to Broadway with her hit show “Kinky Boots.” Now, the music legend is exploring another genre: this time with a good ole’ Nashville country album titled “Detour.” Lauper tells us why her fun isn’t found just with pop music, but country classics that have had a big impact on her life.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 16, 2016 at 6:27 pm

Can your trash be another man’s treasure? For some Americans, called Recyclers, gathering bottles, cans and other materials from our nation’s vast rivers of trash is a way of life and their only source of income. In the new documentary Dogtown Redemption, filmmakers Amir Soltani and Chihiro Wimbush chronicle the lives of three recyclers over seven years as they navigate the streets of West Oakland in search of recyclables.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 14, 2016 at 5:58 am

The Bronx is on fire, but probably not the way you’d think. A new report from the Real Estate Board of New York shows that the city’s often forgotten outer boroughs, The Bronx and Staten Island, are hot with buyers. Over the last twelve months, these boroughs have seen a 35% surge in home sales; the largest gains in the metropolitan area so far this year. Reporter Ivan Pereira of amNew York has an inside look at what’s behind this outer borough housing boom. Then, Ally Hilfiger’s childhood was not easy despite being the daughter of renowned fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger. Her arduous health ordeal began at the age of seven when she was bitten by a tick. Her test was inconclusive, and for years she dealt with unbearable pain and misdiagnoses, from rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, to fibromyalgia and a developed marijuana habit that ultimately led to her being committed to a psychiatric hospital. In her new book Bite Me: How Lyme Disease Stole My Childhood, Made me Crazy, and Almost Killed Me, Hilfiger opens up about her personal battle with Lyme disease, and shares how she hopes to help others. Finally, In 1981, six gay men and their supporters gathered in playwright, author and LGBT rights activist Larry Kramer’s living room to address what was being called “gay cancer” at the time: AIDS. That meeting would provide the foundation for the first HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy organization now known as Gay Men’s Health Crisis. Anthony Hayes, the organization’s vice president of public affairs and policy, joins us to celebrate their 35th anniversary and to discuss their annual AIDS walk happening this Sunday May 15th in Central Park.

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

WNET

© 2016 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019