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August 30, 2016 at 6:27 pm

According to a recent study, nearly 64% of Nassau and Suffolk County renters cannot afford a typical two-bedroom apartment on Long Island. Pair that with fair housing law violations such as discrimination of potential renters, and Long Island quickly becomes a difficult place to thrive. What can be done to improve the island’s affordable and fair housing markets? President of Long Island Housing Partnership Peter Elkowitz and Executive Director of Long Island Housing Service Michelle Santantonio discuss that and how to make Long Island a more viable housing market for all in this latest installment of Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America.

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Episode
August 30, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, how was former nursing home Rivington House sold and slated to become luxury condos if there was a deed restriction on the property? That’s what U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara is probing after the De Blasio administration handled the sale of the former nursing home. As we continue our ongoing series, Corruption Watch, former Federal Prosecutor Jennifer Rodgers joins us to discuss just one of the several headaches that the De Blasio administration faces as Bharara investigates City Hall, and the recent court victory that may allow Bharara to pursue the state pensions belonging to disgraced politicians Dean Skelos and Sheldon Silver for unpaid forfeiture from ill-gotten gains.

Next, what was supposed to be Amber Scorah’s first day back at work after the birth of her son would turn out to be something far more tragic. In July of 2015, Amber left her 3 month-old newborn son, Karl, at an unlicensed daycare in SoHo. When she went back to check on him just a few hours later, she made the horrifying discovery that her son had died. It’s a nightmare no parent should ever have to go through, but it was a reality for Amber and now she is fighting to change parental leave laws in the hope that no other parent has to choose between working to provide for their family or being present to care for them. She joins us to discuss how she’s calling on legislators to ensure paid leave for working parents across the country.

Finally, how could a record released more than 35 years ago still be selling out venues like Madison Square Garden? Bruce Springsteen’s “The River Tour” is coming to the iconic New York City arena, but if you’re trying to get tickets, you’ll need nothing short of a miracle. We discuss why the music and its artist is still captivating audiences decades later with Peter Ames Carlin, the author of the New York Times best-seller Bruce, the first biography in 25 years to be written with the musician’s full cooperation.

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August 29, 2016 at 6:29 pm

How was former nursing home Rivington House sold and slated to become luxury condos if there was a deed restriction on the property? That’s what U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara is probing after the De Blasio administration handled the sale of the former nursing home. As we continue our ongoing series, Corruption Watch, former Federal Prosecutor Jennifer Rodgers joins us to discuss just one of the several headaches that the De Blasio administration faces as Bharara investigates City Hall, and the recent court victory that may allow Bharara to pursue the state pensions belonging to disgraced politicians Dean Skelos and Sheldon Silver for unpaid forfeiture from ill-gotten gains.

Continue Reading

Clip
August 29, 2016 at 6:28 pm

What was supposed to be Amber Scorah’s first day back at work after the birth of her son would turn out to be something far more tragic. In July of 2015, Amber left her 3 month-old newborn son, Karl, at an unlicensed daycare in SoHo. When she went back to check on him just a few hours later, she made the horrifying discovery that her son had died. It’s a nightmare no parent should ever have to go through, but it was a reality for Amber and now she is fighting to change parental leave laws in the hope that no other parent has to choose between working to provide for their family or being present to care for them. She joins us to discuss how she’s calling on legislators to ensure paid leave for working parents across the country.

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Episode
August 27, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, the use of excessive force by the police, particularly in relation to Black Americans, has been one of the most pressing local and national issues in recent memory. Now, New York State Assemblyman Michael Blake is making headlines as he files a formal complaint against the New York City Police Department. The Assemblyman claims he was grabbed and forcefully shoved by an officer while trying to defuse a street confrontation at a community event in his district last July. A superior officer intervened, realizing Blake was an elected official, but NYPD Commissioner William Bratton refused to publicly apologize to Blake for the incident. As Commissioner Bratton steps down and passes the torch to James P. O’Neill, Assemblyman Blake joins us to discuss how he’d like to use the transition in a new strategy to improve the relationship between the police and the community.

Next, millions of fish washed up along the shore in Keansburg, New Jersey, which is causing residents to worry about what happened below the surface that could have caused this devastating effect. The community is certainly not benefiting from the fishy situation. Local businesses are usually bustling with end-of-the-summer activities as families try to get in their last chances at fun in the sun before school starts. This year, these beaches look different. Pix-11 News’ Marvin Scott has the story, and he’ll give us the details tonight.

And finally, pizza guru Colin Atrophy Hagendorf tasted more than 400 slices of Manhattan pizza in search of the city’s best pie and recounts his journey in “Slice Harvester: A Memoir In Pizza.” Hagendorf tell us where he found his favorite slice and explains how he discovered it.

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August 26, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Millions of fish washed up along the shore in Keansburg, New Jersey, which is causing residents to worry about what happened below the surface that could have caused this devastating effect. The community is certainly not benefiting from the fishy situation. Local businesses are usually bustling with end-of-the-summer activities as families try to get in their last chances at fun in the sun before school starts. This year, these beaches look different. Pix-11 News’ Marvin Scott has the story, and he’ll give us the details tonight.

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Episode
August 24, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, the Brooklyn Bridge may be getting some major upgrades as city officials explore the idea of expanding the promenade. In recent years, the bridge has earned a reputation for being congested with people. Between tourists, speeding cyclists, and busy commuters, the 133 year-old landmark isn’t that easy to cross. The issue has caught the attention of the city’s Department of Transportation, who are trying to come up with a solution to the problem. Vin Barone, a transportation reporter for amNewYork, has been watching the story and joins us to explain the latest push to fix the Brooklyn Bridge.

Next, an investigation between local and federal authorities led to the take down of a large-scale racketeering conspiracy ranging from Springfield, Massachusetts, to South Florida, and involved members from four of New York’s five Mafia families. And no, we’re not talking the Sopranos. But what does the modern Mafia look like? Author and journalist for ganglandnews.com, Jerry Capeci tells us about the power of the modern day Mafia, a restaurant on Arthur Avenue that served as an alleged hub for criminal activity, and whether or not the authorities have had any success in cutting New York’s Mafia back.

Then, when Rutgers University joined the Big Ten conference, a collection of universities that organizes intercollegiate athletics, perhaps the most important goal was to bring in big bucks to New Jersey’s largest public university. But going big time in intercollegiate sports has actually cost Rutgers millions, and some argue that it has come at the expense of academics. Steve Adubato, co-anchor of New Jersey Capitol Report, weighs in on whether this prestigious university can remain a player in big college sports without compromising its academic reputation.

Finally, is it possible to be lonely in New York City? Surprisingly, even with 8.4 million people surrounding you, the reality is that human connection is not guaranteed. The case of 72 year-old George Bell exemplifies this notion. Bell died alone in his Jackson Heights apartment during the summer last year, but no one knew exactly when. The circumstances of his death were so troubling, they landed on the front of The New York Times. But is loneliness as distressing as we make it out to be? Olivia Liang is the author of a book that delves into that issue, The Lonely City: Adventures in the Art of Being Alone. She joins us to explain her interest in this subject and share how her thoughts on isolation changed through the course of writing this book.

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August 23, 2016 at 6:28 pm

An investigation between local and federal authorities led to the take down of a large-scale racketeering conspiracy ranging from Springfield, Massachusetts, to South Florida, and involved members from four of New York’s five Mafia families. And no, we’re not talking the Sopranos. But what does the modern Mafia look like? Author and journalist for ganglandnews.com, Jerry Capeci tells us about the power of the modern day Mafia, a restaurant on Arthur Avenue that served as an alleged hub for criminal activity, and whether or not the authorities have had any success in cutting New York’s Mafia back.

Continue Reading

Clip
August 23, 2016 at 6:27 pm

When Rutgers University joined the Big Ten conference, a collection of universities that organizes intercollegiate athletics, perhaps the most important goal was to bring in big bucks to New Jersey’s largest public university. But going big time in intercollegiate sports has actually cost Rutgers millions, and some argue that it has come at the expense of academics. Steve Adubato, co-anchor of New Jersey Capitol Report, weighs in on whether this prestigious university can remain a player in big college sports without compromising its academic reputation.

Continue Reading