Clip
May 16, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Why is a girl from Queens singing country tunes? Cyndi Lauper burst onto the music scene in the 1980’s with the iconic pop song “Girls Just Want To Have Fun” and has covered everything from Rock and Roll to Broadway with her hit show “Kinky Boots.” Now, the music legend is exploring another genre: this time with a good ole’ Nashville country album titled “Detour.” Lauper tells us why her fun isn’t found just with pop music, but country classics that have had a big impact on her life.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 13, 2016 at 6:26 pm

In 1981, six gay men and their supporters gathered in playwright, author and LGBT rights activist Larry Kramer’s living room to address what was being called “gay cancer” at the time: AIDS. That meeting would provide the foundation for the first HIV/AIDS prevention, care and advocacy organization now known as Gay Men’s Health Crisis. Anthony Hayes, the organization’s vice president of public affairs and policy, joins us to celebrate their 35th anniversary and to discuss their annual AIDS walk happening this Sunday May 15th in Central Park.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 13, 2016 at 5:30 am

He was once one of the most powerful lawmakers in New York. Now, former Senate Majority Leader Dean Skelos is facing the possibility of spending the next decade behind bars. On the heels of former state Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver’s 12-year prison sentence last month, Skelos and his son Adam will learn their fates in a Manhattan courtroom today. They were convicted last December of charges including bribery, conspiracy and extortion after the elder Skelos used his office to get his son roughly $300,000 worth of consulting work and a no-show job. Tonight, we are breaking down what happens in court, and taking a look at what is next for ethics reform in Albany. Then finally, he replaced Johnny Carson and made a name for himself on The Tonight Show, and now late-night legend Jay Leno joins us in a one-on-one interview to dish about his time on The Tonight Show, the current state of comedy, his car show Jay Leno’s Garage, and the presidential election. You won’t want to miss it.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 12, 2016 at 6:27 pm

He replaced Johnny Carson and made a name for himself on The Tonight Show, and now late-night legend Jay Leno joins us in a one-on-one interview to dish about his time on The Tonight Show, the current state of comedy, his car show Jay Leno’s Garage, and the presidential election. You won’t want to miss it.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 10, 2016 at 5:48 am

Kurt Eichenwald, a senior writer for Newsweek, stops by to explain his article “American Democracy Was Broken Before Trump.” How does he view the quality of American democracy and the 2016 Presidential election? We’ll find out tonight. There was outrage and anger in Brooklyn last month when many New Yorkers showed up to the polls for the April 19 primaries and found out they couldn’t vote. Officials say over 125,000 voters were mysteriously removed from the rolls, leading New York City Comptroller Scott Stringer to launch an audit of the city’s Board of Elections. He joins us tonight with the latest on his investigation. Then next, guns and Christianity. For some in America, the two are inextricably linked. Yet is it possible to be pro-gun and pro-life? In her new documentary, The Armor of Light, filmmaker Abigail Disney follows the story of a reverend as he struggles to piece together how guns should fit into his ministry, and how they already do. She joins us to discuss the relationship between the church and guns, and how this documentary challenges those ideas. Finally, survival in the animal kingdom may just depend on making friends. Many animals, from the largest to the smallest, often bond with the most unexpected collaborators to succeed in the wild. Executive Producer of PBS Nature, Fred Kaufman, stops by to discuss the new film Nature’s Perfect Partners, which premieres on May 11th and follows the bond between some of the most unexpected pairs in the animal kingdom.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 09, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Guns and Christianity. For some in America, the two are inextricably linked. Yet is it possible to be pro-gun and pro-life? In her new documentary, The Armor of Light, filmmaker Abigail Disney follows the story of a reverend as he struggles to piece together how guns should fit into his ministry, and how they already do. She joins us to discuss the relationship between the church and guns, and how this documentary challenges those ideas.

Continue Reading

Episode
May 07, 2016 at 5:49 am

On Wednesday, April 27th, over 700 law enforcement officers conducted a bust in a New York City housing authority complex in The Bronx. This one bust led to the arrest and indictment of over 120 suspected gang members. Despite this success and the success of similar sweeps in the city, gang-related violence has increased, accounting for half of 2015’s 1,042 shootings and 40% of its 318 murders. Shanduke McPhatter, a rehabilitated gang member, is the founder and the executive director of the nonprofit organization Gangstas Making Astronomical Community Changes, which works with formally incarcerated men and women to help them transition back into society. We discuss the increase in gang violence, G.M.A.C.C., and what steps are being taken to combat the city’s gang problems.

Next, you’ve probably heard of “The Three Tenors” and the “Three Musketeers,” but what about the “Three Doctors?” As part of our ongoing initiative “Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America,” MetroFocus contributor Mike Schneider talks to Dr. Sampson Davis about how a pact between him and his friends when they were teenagers helped him survive the mean streets of Newark and achieve his dream of being a doctor. Then finally, love horse racing? Live in New York? Want to place a bet? You can’t! Not anymore. Tomorrow is the Kentucky Derby, but as some prepare to bet on those competing on the track, we’ll look back on New York in the 1970’s when the city was the only place outside of Nevada to legalize off-track betting. During that time, OTB parlors generated millions of dollars in bets each year, before it was wiped out in 2010. Filmmaker Joseph Fusco covers the rise and fall of this notorious chapter in his new documentary “Finish Line: The Rise and Demise of Off Track Betting.”

Continue Reading

Episode
May 06, 2016 at 5:54 am

Laura Nahmias, Politico New York’s City Hall reporter, sits down with us to talk about the campaign finance laws that prompted an investigation by the New York State Board of Elections into the donations Mayor Bill DeBlasio received from his 2013 mayoral campaign. These donations are said to be between him, union allies, and political groups with the alleged intention of creating a campaign that would allow Democrats to regain control of the State Senate. A Democratic controlled State Senate was never reached, but a probe was initiated to investigate the campaign for ignoring the fact that individual donors are supposed to adhere to a limit of $10,000 donated to a campaign. How is the Mayor’s office handling the controversy sparked by this investigation? We have analysis. Then Bella Abzug didn’t take “no” for an answer. The congresswoman was a New York political icon in the 70’s, and will forever be remembered as a champion of women’s rights, and for encouraging a new generation of women to take up leadership roles. Now, nearly twenty years after Bella’s passing, her daughter Liz continues her cause with a non-profit organization named after her mother. Liz Abzug shares with us how the Bella Abzug Leadership Institute is trying to level the political playing field by helping young women get the necessary education and training to become tomorrow’s leaders. Next, Dolly Parton is many things: a singer-songwriter, actress, philanthropist, Kennedy Center Honoree and National Medal of Arts recipient. But the “queen” of country music hasn’t forgotten where she came from. Raised in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, Parton rose from poverty to become one of the most successful musicians of all time. Her iconic song, “Coat of Many Colors,” tells Parton’s story of growing up poor, and was recently made into a TV movie. Tonight we sit down with the music legend to talk about the story behind that song and her illustrious career. Finally, he sings, and she reports. Rock legend Rod Stewart and Hoda Kotb, a co-host of NBC’s Today Show, have a lot to talk about. Stewart is still touring and performing on some of the biggest stages around the world, but he recently took a break to appear on a different kind of stage with Kotb at New York’s 92nd Street Y. Tonight we listen in on their conversation as they discuss one of his most iconic songs.

Continue Reading

Clip
May 05, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Dolly Parton is many things: a singer-songwriter, actress, philanthropist, Kennedy Center Honoree and National Medal of Arts recipient. But the “queen” of country music hasn’t forgotten where she came from. Raised in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, Parton rose from poverty to become one of the most successful musicians of all time. Her iconic song, “Coat of Many Colors,” tells Parton’s story of growing up poor, and was recently made into a TV movie. Tonight we sit down with the music legend to talk about the story behind that song and her illustrious career.

Continue Reading

Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

WNET

© 2016 WNET All Rights Reserved.

825 Eighth Avenue

New York, NY 10019