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October 03, 2016 at 6:28 pm

Last week’s presidential debate clearly displayed the bitter hatred between candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, but it couldn’t hold a candle to the contention witnessed during the 1968 debates. Liberal Gore Vidal and Conservative William Buckley were bitter political enemies that the media followed closely during the two presidential conventions. The resulting fireworks between the ideological opposites would change political media coverage and shape it into the blood sport it is today. Tonight, Director and Producer Robert Gordon joins us to discuss his Independent Lens documentary, Best of Enemies, which examines these men and their rivalry and the film “Best of Enemies” before it airs tonight on PBS

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October 03, 2016 at 6:27 pm

It’s been over 15 years since Amadou Diallo was brutally killed by four New York City police officers in February of 1999. Although his name may be a forgotten headline for some, his mother Kadiatou, the message that was ignited by her son’s death is as important as ever. In fact, Kadiatou is worried that the country is headed in the wrong direction. She has said, “What is going on here is like many years ago…We’re going backwards, so each time I relive my tragedy.” And the same is true for the countless other mothers of unarmed, black men that lost their lives at the hands of the police, including Eric Garner, Akai Gurley, and many others. In this installment of Listening In, we take you to a panel discussion including Kadiatou and the mother of Eric Gardner where they discuss healing New York City’s communities and putting an end to events like the ones that claimed the lives of their sons.

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October 03, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Rosh Hashanah marks the beginning of the Jewish High Holidays. It’s a time of year when many in the Jewish community come together at their local synagogue for prayer, self-reflection and a greater sense of community. But for some, it’s physically impossible to make a trip to the synagogue. And for others, the attendance fees for holiday services may well be unaffordable. In an effort to reach more of their community, one synagogue on Long Island has gone high tech, and we take you there to see how they’re making the high holidays more accessible.

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September 30, 2016 at 6:28 pm

The University of Notre Dame is consistently ranked as one of the top Catholic colleges in the nation and a celebrated leader in academics and collegiate sports. But many LGBT Catholic students and alumni feel the university falls short in supporting its lesbian, gay, bi-sexual, and transgendered students, staff, and faculty. A group of gay and lesbian alumni from Notre […]

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Episode
September 29, 2016 at 5:47 am

Tonight, the nation is still a livewire of opinions and emotions after Monday night’s presidential debate at Hofstra University. Both political camps have been impassioned on social media and in television, including Vice President Joe Biden, who took to the stage in Philadelphia yesterday to campaign for Hillary Clinton. Tonight, as a part of our ongoing series Listening In, we’ll show you the no-holds-barred speech the vice president gave at Drexel University concerning statements Donald Trump made regarding taxes and his finances during the first presidential debate.

Next, a federal investigation is underway and disgraced former Congressman Anthony Weiner will potentially face federal charges over his latest sexting scandal. The FBI, as well as the NYPD, have opened preliminary investigations into allegations that Weiner exchanged sexually explicit messages with a 15-year-old high school student. This is all in addition to the existing investigation by the New York City Child Welfare Agency after images from a previous sexting scandal surfaced including his 4-year-old son. Will Anthony Weiner find himself serving time? Criminal defense attorney Paul P. Martin joins us to discuss the investigations and the charges Weiner could face if the allegations prove to be credible.

Then, another day, another corruption charge in Albany. First Sheldon Silver, then Dean Skelos. Now, the latest corruption case finds two former aides of Governor Cuomo charged by the U.S. Attorney’s office, along with a senior state official and others in connection to the governor’s signature upstate economic development program dubbed “Buffalo Billion.” This, of course, not only raises major questions about how the governor’s programs were managed, but also how the governor has handled corruption in the capitol, something he vowed to clean up when he took office. Albany Bureau Chief for Politico, Jimmy Vielkind sheds light on the current political climate in Albany and what it means for the governor and his administration.

And finally, the fight over gentrification and affordable housing in New York City is all too real for some New Yorkers. Last week, we introduced you to one of them, Raymond Tirado, who refuses to move out of his East Harlem apartment. He has turned down several buyout offers from his landlord, and is now the subject of the documentary “Last Tenant Standing in East Harlem.” Tonight we’re bringing you the other side of this story. Yi Han, the co-owner of Tirado’s building, has plans to redevelop the property and feels her project will make the Manhattan neighborhood more accessible to the middle class. She joins us with her response to the film and to tell us what challenges developers are facing as they try to build in the city.

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September 28, 2016 at 6:26 pm

The fight over gentrification and affordable housing in New York City is all too real for some New Yorkers. Last week, we introduced you to one of them, Raymond Tirado, who refuses to move out of his East Harlem apartment. He has turned down several buyout offers from his landlord, and is now the subject of the documentary “Last Tenant Standing in East Harlem.” Tonight we’re bringing you the other side of this story. Yi Han, the co-owner of Tirado’s building, has plans to redevelop the property and feels her project will make the Manhattan neighborhood more accessible to the middle class. She joins us with her response to the film and to tell us what challenges developers are facing as they try to build in the city.

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Episode
September 27, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight is a political television event months in the making. Anticipated to have more viewers around the nation than the Super Bowl, the first presidential debate at Hofstra University is supposed to pull an audience of approximately 100 million people. But with 40 days to go before Election Day, numbers, polls, and ratings are becoming more important than ever. Polls have been crunching numbers non-stop. Currently, Bloomberg.com says it’s a dead heat with a 46 percent tie between the candidates and Nate Silver at 538.com predicts 51.5 percent for Clinton and 48.5 percent for Trump. While the gap closes between the candidates, things are sure to be different by this time tomorrow, and we will have the latest tomorrow night with an in-depth analysis of what’s to come.

Then finally, in 1967, a new show aired on a local station in Dayton, Ohio, that audiences had never seen. The Phil Donahue Show put thought-provoking topics, controversial guests, and the audience together for the first time to create conversations not previously seen on television. The show ran for 29 years and defined the genre of daytime talk TV forever, paving the way for talk show sensations from Oprah Winfrey to Ellen DeGeneres. At the helm of this trail-blazing talk show is Phil Donahue himself, someone who has never been shy to discuss anything from politics, to the media, to Washington, and anything in between. This pioneer of daytime talk joins us tonight to discuss the highs and lows of his career.

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September 26, 2016 at 6:28 pm

In 1967, a new show aired on a local station in Dayton, Ohio, that audiences had never seen. The Phil Donahue Show put thought-provoking topics, controversial guests, and the audience together for the first time to create conversations not previously seen on television. The show ran for 29 years and defined the genre of daytime talk TV forever, paving the way for talk show sensations from Oprah Winfrey to Ellen DeGeneres. At the helm of this trail-blazing talk show is Phil Donahue himself, someone who has never been shy to discuss anything from politics, to the media, to Washington, and anything in between. This pioneer of daytime talk joins us tonight to discuss the highs and lows of his career.

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Episode
September 24, 2016 at 7:29 pm

It was a sitcom that started off in 1989 as a self-proclaimed show about nothing. Fast forward nine years and many successful seasons later, and Seinfeld aired its final episode to an audience of more than 76 million viewers. In 2016, it still remains as a recognizable facet of American culture, with fan-favorite episodes and relevant quotes that are still a part of our mainstream lives. A new book Seinfeldia celebrates creators Larry David and Jerry Seinfeld, bringing fans behind the scenes of the show that became an American television phenomenon. T.V. historian, entertainment writer, and author of Seinfeldia, Jennifer Keishin Armstrong joins us to discuss how this show went from humble, comedic beginnings to a television series with a lasting impact.

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