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November 23, 2016 at 1:26 pm

When it comes to applying to some of the top high schools here in New York City, students from low-income families face an uphill battle. Like their wealthier peers, there’s an admission test to get ready for and forms to fill out. But there are also challenges at home — including parents who can’t afford to pay for extra tutoring […]

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Episode
November 23, 2016 at 5:59 am

Tonight, a Thanksgiving terror arrest. The alt-right movement comes out in favor of President-Elect Trump as he blasts the media. And do black lives matter? The election of Donald Trump has sparked serious concerns among the most prominent organization fighting for racial justice in this country, the Black Lives Matter movement. In the days after the election, they released a damning statement confirming that their mission remains unchanged after what they say is the election of “a white supremacist to the highest office.” MetroFocus producer William Jones had the opportunity to sit down with Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery, who has covered the movement since its birth in Ferguson, about his new book They Can’t Kill Us All, and what the post-election period has taught him about the state of race in America.

Next, there has been a recent string of attacks against New Yorkers by mentally disturbed individuals. Recently, we spoke to DJ Jaffe, executive director of Mental Illness Policy Org., who essentially blamed the city’s mental health initiative ThriveNYC for its misguided and politically correct policies. Tonight, we go to the city’s Department of Health in Long Island City where Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett addresses these claims, and discusses how the $850 million dollar ThriveNYC initiative is helping New Yorkers.

Finally, from an early age, we’re told: “Don’t to talk to strangers.” In a city of more than 8 million people, New Yorkers are notorious for sticking to that rule. But TED speaker Kio Stark argues we have everything to gain by acknowledging strangers. In her new book When Strangers Meet: How People You Don’t Know Can Transform You, she explains that it all starts with “hello.”

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November 22, 2016 at 6:13 pm

From an early age, we’re told: “Don’t to talk to strangers.” In a city of more than 8 million people, New Yorkers are notorious for sticking to that rule. But TED speaker Kio Stark argues we have everything to gain by acknowledging strangers. In her new book When Strangers Meet: How People You Don’t Know Can Transform You, she explains that it all starts with “hello.”

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Clip
November 22, 2016 at 6:12 pm

Washington Post reporter Wesley Lowery discusses the birth of Black Lives Matter and its future given the seismic political shift this country has witnessed. The Pulitzer Prize winning journalist has dedicated his reporting to covering the protest movement and his experiences in Ferguson to Baltimore and beyond are documented in his latest book, “They Can’t Kill Us All.”

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Episode
November 19, 2016 at 8:22 am

Tonight, after multiple setbacks and numerous protests, New York City is pressing play on its body camera program. The NYPD will be moving forward with a $6.4 million contract with the company VieVu to provide cameras and data storage for what would be one of the country’s largest body camera programs. Across the river in New Jersey, another city is already testing out police body cameras: Camden, one of the poorest and most dangerous cities in the country. But now, after decades of economic downturn and violent crime, change is coming with help from the newly formed police force. MetroFocus producer William Jones takes to the streets of Camden, where officers are testing out this new technology to improve policing.

Next, as life expectancy reaches an all-time high, we as a city are aging. More than 1.4 million New Yorkers are 60 years of age or older. By 2030 that number is estimated to swell to more than 1.8 million, or 20% of city residents, raising demand for affordable housing and health and social services. We get a look at how the nonprofit Selfhelp is answering that call, providing care and services to thousands of aging New Yorkers.

Finally, maybe you’ve caught a compelling story on The Moth Radio Hour on WNYC, downloaded a podcast, or been to a live “story-slam”. The Moth has been dedicated to the art of simple storytelling, told live on stage with no script, just a microphone, a spotlight and a room full of strangers. We caught a behind the scenes look at one woman’s personal storytelling journey from the rural mountains of Nepal to women’s health advocate as part of The Moth’s global community program “Women In The World,” recently performed at Jazz At Lincoln Center.

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Clip
November 18, 2016 at 6:41 pm

Maybe you’ve caught a compelling story on The Moth Radio Hour on WNYC, downloaded a podcast, or been to a live “story-slam”. The Moth has been dedicated to the art of simple storytelling, told live on stage with no script, just a microphone, a spotlight and a room full of strangers. We caught a behind the scenes look at one woman’s personal storytelling journey from the rural mountains of Nepal to women’s health advocate as part of The Moth’s global community program “Women In The World,” recently performed at Jazz At Lincoln Center.

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Episode
November 18, 2016 at 5:46 am

Tonight, Mayor de Blasio and President-Elect Donald Trump met for more than an hour yesterday where they discussed, among many things, Trump’s campaign promise to deport millions of undocumented immigrants, and build a wall along the Mexican border. But what are the realities of his policies, and are the fears of undocumented immigrants legitimate? Michael Wildes, the immigration lawyer who defended the citizenship status of Melania Trump, joins us with his take on the future of immigration under Donald Trump.

Next, we’ve witnessed a significant increase in hate crimes across the country following last week’s election, including here in New York, where Governor Cuomo launched an investigation after swastika graffiti was discovered at student accommodation buildings at SUNY Geneseo. President-Elect Donald Trump has recently confronted the issue on 60 Minutes, but that has done little to assuage the fears of many who have been targeted. We discuss it all with Huffington Post journalist and Muslim-American Rowaida Abdelaziz and New York City Council-member Ritchie Torres.

Then, when natural disaster strikes, one New York-based organization is there to wade through flood waters and dig through debris to save animals. They’re the Guardians of Rescue, but they do much more than just enter disaster zones. Founder Robert Misseri joins us with a look at their mission protecting the well-being of animals in our community that are homeless, helpless and in need of a hug.

Finally, scattered across the five boroughs of New York City are vibrant organizations serving children and adults of all ages and from every walk of life. These are the settlement houses: centers that provide help and new opportunity to our urban population. The new documentary Treasures of New York: Settlement Houses, which airs tonight at 8pm on WLIW, explores how the 130-year old settlement house movement remains integral to New York City.

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Clip
November 17, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Scattered across the five boroughs of New York City are vibrant organizations serving children and adults of all ages and from every walk of life. These are the settlement houses: centers that provide help and new opportunity to our urban population. The new documentary Treasures of New York: Settlement Houses, which airs tonight at 8pm on WLIW, explores how the 130-year old settlement house movement remains integral to New York City.

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Mutual of America PSEG

Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross, and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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