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September 16, 2016 at 6:28 pm

PBS’ Spotlight Education Week nears it’s close, just in time for tomorrow’s American Graduate Day! We’ll have a preview of the public television project that aims to help local communities find ways to keep students on the path to graduation. What can you expect from the program and how does WNET hope to revolutionize learning? WNET’s Vice President of Education Carole Wacey joins us to answer those questions and offer more insight into American Graduate Day.

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September 16, 2016 at 6:26 pm

This week in history, a young, black woman was able to run from the shackles of 19th century slavery to freedom and forever changed the world. Known as “The Moses of Her People,” Harriet Tubman continued to travel into the southern states and liberated more than 300 slaves through the Underground Railroad over the course of 11 years. Tonight, in honor of this American legend, we’ll take you to her home in Upstate New York, which has become a historic site run by the National Park Service.

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Episode
September 16, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, from pro-wrestler to Navy SEAL and actor, Jesse Ventura has done it all, but he shocked many in the country when he became Minnesota Governor in 1999. Since leaving office in 2003, Ventura has remained in the public eye by writing books and being vocal on many controversial matters from the Kennedy assassination to the war on drugs and marijuana legalization. A longtime friend of Donald Trump, a one-time supporter of Bernie Sanders and a current supporter of Libertarian Presidential candidate Gary Johnson, Jesse Ventura joins us tonight to share his thoughts on this year’s presidential election, the current state of American politics, and tells us why he would never throw his hat into this ring.

Next, Jahana Hayes is a history teacher at the John F. Kennedy High School in Waterbury, Connecticut. This year, she took home an outstanding title for her contribution to the field of education: 2016 Teacher of the Year. As she continues to hold the title, she will travel as an ambassador in her profession, hoping to encourage other teachers around the nation to follow the path she blazed in the classroom. We get the chance to speak to her as she travels and discuss the challenges she’s faced, her secrets to success in the classroom, and what it’s like to hold that distinct honor.

Then finally, school may have started in America, but around the world, there are still children who don’t have access to what many believe is a natural right: a basic education. Back in 2000, the United Nations set out to change that with the goal that come 2015, children everywhere would have the ability to complete a full course of primary education. Over the course of the past 16 years, cameras were rolling and followed 5 children from around the globe in their pursuit to finish a basic education. Now, a film called Time for School gives us a look into the lives of Nanavi in Benin, Jefferson in Brazil, Neeraj in India, Joab in Kenya, and Shugufa in Afghanistan. Nina Chaudry, the film’s director and producer, joins us tonight to share more about the making of this documentary and discuss the harrowing experience of these individuals as they strove to finish their schooling

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September 15, 2016 at 6:29 pm

From pro-wrestler to Navy SEAL and actor, Jesse Ventura has done it all, but he shocked many in the country when he became Minnesota Governor in 1999. Since leaving office in 2003, Ventura has remained in the public eye by writing books and being vocal on many controversial matters from the Kennedy assassination to the war on drugs and marijuana legalization. A longtime friend of Donald Trump, a one-time supporter of Bernie Sanders and a current supporter of Libertarian Presidential candidate Gary Johnson, Jesse Ventura joins us tonight to share his thoughts on this year’s presidential election, the current state of American politics, and tells us why he would never throw his hat into this ring.

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Clip
September 15, 2016 at 6:27 pm

School may have started in America, but around the world, there are still children who don’t have access to what many believe is a natural right: a basic education. Back in 2000, the United Nations set out to change that with the goal that come 2015, children everywhere would have the ability to complete a full course of primary education. Over the course of the past 16 years, cameras were rolling and followed 5 children from around the globe in their pursuit to finish a basic education. Now, a film called Time for School gives us a look into the lives of Nanavi in Benin, Jefferson in Brazil, Neeraj in India, Joab in Kenya, and Shugufa in Afghanistan. Nina Chaudry, the film’s director and producer, joins us tonight to share more about the making of this documentary and discuss the harrowing experience of these individuals as they strove to finish their schooling.

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Episode
September 15, 2016 at 5:31 am

Tonight, results from yesterday’s primary may have disappointed some New York incumbents, but it turns out a dead man can still pull in votes. We let you know where the votes fell and who will be taking over political office. With what is sure to be an exciting general election quickly approaching in November, how do the results from yesterday shift power in New York?

Next, all studies point to one thing that has a positive effect on not only the success of an individual but the national economy they live in: a quality education. That simple fact doesn’t change that America, once known as one of the top countries in educational achievement, has fallen behind, especially in topics such as math and science. So what is keeping our nation’s students back and how can we become top achievers again in a global market that becomes more competitive with each day? A new Nova documentary, School of the Future, explores those questions and the challenges facing today’s students. Dr. Pamela Cantor is one of the subjects in this film and she will join us to discuss the issues our kids deal with in and out of the classroom.

Then, as America’s youth heads back to school, high school seniors are facing the daunting task of applying to college. Between taking the SATs, writing admissions essays, and completing scholarship applications, the payoff has increasingly been a rejection letter from some of the most elite schools in the world. It’s a hard blow for many students and their parents, but does the university you attend really determine how bright your future could be? The New York Times columnist Frank Bruni joins us to discuss the stressful time students have applying for college and whether picking the right school is as important as we think it is.

Finally, what makes the world round, the sky blue, or gives every snowflake a unique shape? Those seemingly unanswerable questions are explored in a new PBS series called Forces of Nature. This four-part series will show how we experience the natural forces that shape our world and the fundamental laws governing all life and matter on Earth. Tonight, PBS’ Vice President of Programming Bill Gardner will join us to discuss the making of Forces of Nature and what you can expect from the program before it premieres tonight.

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Clip
September 14, 2016 at 6:28 pm

All studies point to one thing that has a positive effect on not only the success of an individual but the national economy they live in: a quality education. That simple fact doesn’t change that America, once known as one of the top countries in educational achievement, has fallen behind, especially in topics such as math and science. So what is keeping our nation’s students back and how can we become top achievers again in a global market that becomes more competitive with each day? A new Nova documentary, School of the Future, explores those questions and the challenges facing today’s students. Dr. Pamela Cantor is one of the subjects in this film and she will join us to discuss the issues our kids deal with in and out of the classroom.

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Clip
September 14, 2016 at 6:26 pm

What makes the world round, the sky blue, or gives every snowflake a unique shape? Those seemingly unanswerable questions are explored in a new PBS series called Forces of Nature. This four-part series will show how we experience the natural forces that shape our world and the fundamental laws governing all life and matter on Earth. Tonight, PBS’ Vice President of Programming Bill Gardner will join us to discuss the making of Forces of Nature and what you can expect from the program before it premieres tonight.

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Episode
September 14, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, the presidential race between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton is seen by some as one of the most contentious political races of our time. But what does it take to run for the most powerful office in the world? The Contenders: 16 for ’16 is a new PBS series that looks at the most compelling and influential presidential campaigns of the past fifty years using first-hand accounts from many former presidential hopefuls, from Jesse Jackson and Howard Dean to Gary Hart and Pat Buchanan. Carlos Watson, host of The Contenders: 16 for ’16 and editor of OZY Media, previews the series and its first episode, which explores the campaigns of Senator John McCain and Congresswoman Shirley Chisholm.

Next, for many Americans, the progression of education is evident: finish high school, go to college, start your career. But what happens when you graduate and learn that the education you received is inadequate for the working world? Or worse, what if your school shuts down before you’ve even had a chance to complete your degree? Those are just some of the horrors faced by numerous students who attended a number of for-profit colleges across the country. Martin Smith, the correspondent in a new FRONTLINE documentary, A Subprime Education, discusses the film and the controversies behind these for-profit institutions.

Then finally, six years ago, Nadia Lopez launched the Mott Hall Bridges Academy with the message, “Open a school to close a prison.” At the time the academy opened in Brownsville, Brooklyn, one of the most violent in neighborhoods in the city, every single enrolled student lived below the poverty line. Lopez admitted that she considered quitting after not having luck recruiting teachers to engage with the students. Her spirits were lifted when one of her students was featured on the beloved blog Humans of New York, and called Lopez his hero. The post was shared millions of times and the response was remarkable, garnering a million dollar fundraising campaign for the school and a chance to meet with President Barack Obama. Tonight, we tell you more about her amazing story and share her TED Talk, “Education Revolution,” in which she explains how her school transformed struggling NYC students into driven, hopeful scholars.

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MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, Rosalind P. Walter, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Jody and John Arnhold, the Tiger Baron Foundation, the Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, the Metropolitan Media Fund, Laura and Jim Ross, the Dorothy Pacella Fund, in memory of Vincent Pacella and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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