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December 01, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Betty Buckley, also known as “the voice of Broadway”, won a Tony in 1983 for her role as Gizabella in the unforgettable Broadway show Cats. MetroFocus host Rafael Pi Roman recently had the chance to sit down with Buckley at Joe’s Pub in the Public Theater for an exclusive interview. Find out how playing Gizabella shaped her life and career and the surprising inspiration for this memorable role.

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Episode
December 01, 2016 at 5:53 am

Tonight, the Trump team chose Twitter as their go-to outlet during the campaign, discrediting traditional media sources along the way. Now that Donald Trump has been elected president, how will the media adapt to cover the Trump administration? New York Post film critic and op-ed columnist, Kyle Smith discusses Trump’s unconventional relationship with the media and whether their coverage has been biased.

Next, who says bigger is always better? In the world of micro apartments, tiny could be the future of New York City living. New York Times Real Estate Editor Vivian S. Toy gives us a tour of the micro world some New Yorkers call home.

Finally, “G” is for gentrification, a buzz-word in many New York City neighborhoods. Student journalist Pamela Puello’s new film documents how rising prices and new construction drives many locals from their Harlem homes. Ellen Baxter, executive director of Broadway Housing Communities, helped shepherd a low-income housing complex called the Sugar Hill Project, featured in Puello’s film, which acts as an affordable option in the fight against gentrification. We hit the streets for a look at the changing neighborhood and what it means for the people living there.

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November 30, 2016 at 6:27 pm

“G” is for gentrification, a buzz-word in many New York City neighborhoods. Student journalist Pamela Puello’s new film documents how rising prices and new construction drives many locals from their Harlem homes. Ellen Baxter, executive director of Broadway Housing Communities, helped shepherd a low-income housing complex called the Sugar Hill Project, featured in Puello’s film, which acts as an affordable option in the fight against gentrification. We hit the streets for a look at the changing neighborhood and what it means for the people living there.

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Episode
November 30, 2016 at 5:13 am

Tonight, do you have enough pennies saved for a rainy day? A recent report from the non-profit Association for Neighborhood & Housing Development reveals that nearly 60% of New York City residents don’t have enough cash in the bank to cover household expenses for at least 3 months. Amy Zimmer outlines the troubling statistics facing many of our neighbors in a recent DNA Info article titled “Most New Yorkers are Roughly 1 Paycheck Away from Homelessness” and shares her findings with us as part of our ongoing initiative, Chasing the Dream: Poverty and Opportunity in America.

Then, it’s the political pay-to-play corruption case that has cast a long shadow over state politics for the last two months: a far reaching, bid-rigging, bribery scheme that led investigators to the indictments just days ago of eight men. Two of those men, Joseph Percoco and Dr. Alain Kaloyeros, are key members of Governor Cuomo’s inner circle and are facing charges including wire fraud, bribery, conspiracy to commit extortion and honest services fraud. What light could the felony trial shed on Albany’s shady dealings? Politico Albany Bureau Chief Jimmy Vielkind has the latest on what this could mean for the Governor.

Next, the lighting of the Christmas tree in New York City’s Rockefeller Center has been a holiday tradition for America and NBC, which broadcasts the spectacular event that signals the coming of the Christmas season. Ahead of tomorrow’s broadcast, we rock around the Christmas tree with a special history lesson from Al Roker, “America’s Weatherman” and anchor of the Today Show, who will once again host this year’s festivities.

Finally, what makes a good leader? Can leadership be learned? And what are the consequences when leadership fails? There are just some of the questions raised by Steve Adubato, host of One-on-One With Steve Adubato, in his latest book Lessons in Leadership, which spotlights a wide gamut of innovators and provides concrete tools and tips for any aspiring leader. Adubato joins us to share his insight on the critical importance of good leadership.

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November 29, 2016 at 6:27 pm

The lighting of the Christmas tree in New York City’s Rockefeller Center has been a holiday tradition for America and NBC, which broadcasts the spectacular event that signals the coming of the Christmas season. Ahead of tomorrow’s broadcast, we rock around the Christmas tree with a special history lesson from Al Roker, “America’s Weatherman” and anchor of the Today Show, who will once again host this year’s festivities.

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Episode
November 29, 2016 at 6:41 am

Tonight, from New Jersey’s “Havana on the Hudson” in Union City, to Times Square, reaction to the death of former Cuban revolutionary leader Fidel Castro has been passionate and divided. But what’s next for the island nation and its ex-pats in our area? We look at the future of American relations with Cuba.

Next, as President-Elect Donald Trump and his team work to assemble the administration’s cabinet, the transition faces turmoil from Green Party presidential candidate Jill Stein, who raised nearly $7 million dollars to start a vote recount in the swing states of Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. Team Clinton has now joined the fray as Team Trump calls the move a “scam.” But does a recount matter? We have analysis.

Then, ‘tis the season for Christmas tree shopping. But when picking your pines should you go real or fake? We’ll help you and your family decide with help from The Nature Conservancy.

Finally, Sam Shepard’s Pulitzer prize-winning play Buried Child debuts tonight at 9pm on Thirteen on Theater Close-Up: the show where we give you a front row seat to the best of off-Broadway and regional theater. We have a look at the production from The New Group taped this past March, which stars Ed Harris and Amy Madigan.

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November 28, 2016 at 6:26 pm

Sam Shepard’s Pulitzer prize-winning play Buried Child debuts tonight at 9pm on Thirteen on Theater Close-Up: the show where we give you a front row seat to the best of off-Broadway and regional theater. We have a look at the production from The New Group taped this past March, which stars Ed Harris and Amy Madigan.

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Episode
November 24, 2016 at 5:30 am

Tonight, nearly 60,000 people are sleeping in New York City shelters every night, according to the most recent statistics from City Hall. That number is up 18 percent since Mayor de Blasio took office two years ago, but city officials say congestion in shelters would be much worse if not for large investments in homeless programs. For many people on the streets, part of the problem is that they don’t know where their families are or how to contact them. That’s where Miracle Messages steps in. The organization uses videos and social media to track down and reunite the homeless with their families. The group’s founder, Kevin Adler, joins us tonight to talk more about the city’s homeless problem and the miracles his organization is facilitating every day.

Next, Koko the Gorilla isn’t your average ape. This 45-year-old primate was taught sign language as a youngster by an animal psychologist who has gone on to become her surrogate mother. For decades, Koko has received worldwide recognition for her ability to communicate with humans. But some in the scientific community are skeptical about her true ability to understand and respond to what people are saying. The documentary, Koko: The Gorilla Who Talks, from PBS and the BBC explores this remarkable animal’s life and the controversy surrounding her. Tonight we take a look at the film and sit down with the documentary’s producer to go inside Koko’s story.

Finally, while you snuggle up with your loved ones in front of the TV, what are some of the top films sure to get you in the holiday spirit? Our friends from Fandango share their list of the best season-starters.

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Funders

MetroFocus is made possible by James and Merryl Tisch, the Anderson Family Fund, Judy and Josh Weston, Bernard and Irene Schwartz, the Sylvia A. and Simon B. Poyta Programming Endowment to Fight Anti-Semitism, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, the Cheryl and Philip Milstein Family, The Dorothy Schiff Endowment for News and Public Affairs Programming, Jody and John Arnhold, Rosalind P. Walter, the Dr. Robert C. and Tina Sohn Foundation, Laura and Jim Ross, and Shailaja and Umesh Nagarkatte.

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