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Dianne McIntyre
Born: 1936
Occupation: dancer, teacher, choreographer
Dianne McIntyre was born in Cleveland, Ohio, where she studied dance from childhood. She continued her training at Ohio State University. She moved to New York City in 1970; among the dancers she studied and worked with were such avant-garde dancers as Viola Farber, Alwin Nikolais and Company, and Gus Solomons. In the early 1970s, she formed her own company, Sounds in Motion, in which she put the sounds of jazz music and spoken poetry into dance. She used movement, music, and voices in a contemporary modern dance context. Touring extensively throughout the United States and Europe, Sounds In Motion performed McIntyre's most important pieces, including "Lost Sun" (1973), "Deep South Suite" (1976), and "Journey to Forever" (1977).

McIntyre has choreographed for theater productions in New York and London, and her dances are in the repertories of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Dayton Contemporary Dance Company, and other dance ensembles. She was honored with a 1989 "Bessie" (New York Dance and Performance Award); in 1990 she was granted a prestigious three-year Choreographer's Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts; and in 1953, she received the Helen Hayes Award for Outstanding Theater Choreography.

McIntyre's career has been marked by her resilience, resolve, and choreographic curiosity. In 1991, she premiered a vibrant and painstakingly researched reconstruction of Helen Tamiris' 1937 work "How Long Brethren?", a socially militant dance drawing on African-American themes. As she matures, McIntyre's choreographic interests keep expanding, renewing respect for herself as an innovative interpreter of the African-American experience.

-- Kimberly Pittman

Emery, Lynne Fauley. BLACK DANCE FROM 1619 TO TODAY. 2nd rev. ed. Princeton, N.J., 1988.
Long, Richard. THE BLACK TRADITION IN AMERICAN DANCE. 1989.

Source Citation: "Dianne McIntyre." ENCYCLOPEDIA OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN CULTURE AND HISTORY. 5 vols. Macmillan, 1996. Reprinted by permission of Gale Group.