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spacerRole Playing Activities: Confidences
spacer Utilizing the following role-play scenario is an effective strategy for getting students to actively participate in a meaningful dialogue about substance abuse and addiction.

A teacher or student can serve as facilitator for these activities. The facilitator should set up the scenarios for the role-play and select students to take the parts outlined in the script. Different students should take parts in each scene. This gives the students in the classroom an opportunity to "experience" the issues first hand. Once the scene has been played out, the facilitator should discuss the outcome with the class and see if others might have played out the scene in a different way. When participating in role-play, each player's goal should be clear to him/her. The desired goal may arise from discussion prior to the activity, or be assigned by the facilitator.

Scene One

Characters:
    Joe/Josie, Friend.
Scenario:
    Joe/Josie is your friend. He/she is the cutest guy/girl in the junior class. He/she is class president, a basketball star, and runs track in the spring. Joe/Josie is also a good student. Everybody in the school would die to hang out with him/her.

    Joe/Josie's been drinking. It's late and time to go home. You offer to drive Joe/Josie home.
Joe/Josie: (To Friend) "Hey man, I can't let you drive me home. My parents will know something is up. Let me stay over at your house."

Friend: "I don't know..."

Continue to role-play the scene.

Facilitator: When the scene has played out, lead the class in a discussion about how the Friend handled the situation.
  • Would you let Joe/Josie stay over?
  • How else might you handle the scene?

Scene Two

Characters:
    Friend, Friend's parent.
Scenario:
    You get home. You take Joe/Josie in the back door and get him/her into your room. And then there is a knock on the door. It's your dad/mom. What are you going to do? Are you going to tell your mom/dad that Joe/Josie is drunk in your room?
Parent: "Hi, kiddo. I'm glad you're home. How was your evening?"

Friend: "Hey, Mom/Dad! Umm... it was, uh..."

Continue to role-play the scene.


Scene Three

Characters:
    Joe/Josie, Friend.
Scenario:
    This isn't the first time that Joe/Josie has overdone it. You're a little worried about him/her. He/She's been doing a lot of binge drinking. His/Her game isn't up to par. He/She seems to be stoned or drunk all of the time. What are you going to do?
Friend: (Approach Joe/Josie and ask him/her about the problem.)

Joe/Josie: "Look, I'm seventeen years old and I want to have a little fun. I know what I'm doing. It's not like I'm an alcoholic or something."

Continue to role-play the scene.

Facilitator: When the scene has played out, lead the class in a discussion about how the Friend handled the situation.
  • Were you all satisfied with that exchange?
  • What might you say differently?
  • Would you give up? What if this were your best friend?
  • Would you talk to a counselor about the problem?
  • Would you tell his/her parents?
  • What if you thought Joe/Josie was becoming an alcoholic?
  • What if Joe/Josie began using crack cocaine or heroin?
If the class decides they would want to talk to a counselor, have two students role-play that scene.



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