Concept to ClassroomThirteenED HOME
Home About The Series Resources
 
Explanation Demonstration Exploration Implementation Get Credit


This section gives you a framework to design your own lessons aligned with standards.

Below are form elements that you can use in planning your lessons. They are followed by explanations of what should go in each box and what you should think about as you fill it out. A blank template for this activity is also available by clicking the button "Lesson Plan Format." (If you want, print out copies and keep them to write on.)



How to use the form in designing a lesson




How to use the form in designing a lesson

Assignment/Task/Work
First, think of what you are asking students to do as a verb, not a noun -- an action, rather than a topic. That is, in mathematics, don't think "measurement." Instead think of the task: "Find out how many square yards of carpet you will need for this L-shaped room and explain how you got your answer." Similarly, don't think of "writing," but of "persuading the principal of your school to start a recycling program in the cafeteria." Remember that standards are not only concerned with what students know, but what they can do with what they know.

Assignment/Task/Work









Standards Addressed

This step in planning is essential -- if you can't find any standards to which your task is aligned, it probably won't be a helpful assignment.

Your copy of your standards will eventually become dog-eared and stained with whatever beverage you like to drink while planning your lessons. Which standards they are -- national, state, local -- doesn't matter as much as being sure they are the standards aligned with the district's tests and assessments. If you are sure that your students can do well on the local tests, then of course you can go beyond them to more rigorous standards.

Standards Addressed










List one, two, or three major standards to target with this assignment or task.



Scoring Guide Designed with Your Students
Write here the features you would like to see in a 4-point scoring guide that you will develop with your students. You won't announce these first -- what you want to learn from your students is how they think a superb product should look, one that completes the task and meets the standards. The students may come up with the same things you have listed, but if they don't, you can steer them in that direction. Discovering their perspective will allow you to gauge their ability to actually do the task -- what they think is doing well and what they think is failing is a good guide to how well they understand what they are being asked to do. Please note: be prepared for "kid language" in their scoring guides. We've seen "Wow!" "O.K." and "Oops" in elementary scoring guides. That's fine, as long as it conveys the points you want to make.

Scoring Guide Designed with Your Students










   

Set a Time to Complete Task or Assignment
Try to make this time period shorter than you are used to. Students usually respond better to a faster rather than a slower pace. Tell them exactly how much time you are going to spend on this task and keep to the schedule.

Time to Complete Task or Assignment






Product
This box is here to help you make sure that you are clear about what the students will produce at the end of the task. Insisting on measurable products is an important part of standards orientation. Teachers will often think of lessons in terms of "my students will experiment with ______" but not in terms of the product that will be scored. The product doesn't have to be writing -- it can be a videotape, a Web site, a three-dimensional model -- but it must be scorable, and there must be clear criteria for scoring it in the scoring guide. Writing is usually an important component of a product.

Product










Supplies Needed
Most teachers are familiar with going through a lesson in their minds and noting every item needed, and a standards-based lesson is no different.

Supplies Needed










Instructional Strategies
List the strategies you will use to teach the lesson -- learning centers, simulations, direct instruction, cooperative groups, library and field trips, etc. Use whatever strategies you think will best help all the students meet the standards. This is where your expertise as a teacher will be invaluable.

Instructional Strategies



















Workshop: Teaching to Academic Standards
Explanation | Demonstration | Exploration | Implementation

Concept to Classroom | About the Series | Resources | Sitemap | Credits

Thirteen | Thirteen Ed Online | thirteencelebration.org