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Letter to Administrator

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Rubric and List of Critera

In this section, we have provided you with the following tools to help you acquire professional development credit for this workshop. If you are interested, we suggest that you print these items and discuss them with your administrator.

Syllabus

Concept to Classroom: Multiple Intelligences

In this section of the workshop, participants review Howard Gardner's nine Multiple Intelligences, take a short Multiple Intelligences Self-Inventory, reconsider traditional measurements of intelligence, examine the benefits and criticisms of the Multiple Intelligences theory, and view a video of Howard Gardner talking with students at a school about the advantages of a curriculum design that incorporates Multiple Intelligences. The following questions are addressed:

    1. What is the theory of multiple intelligences (M.I.)?

    2. How does this theory differ from the traditional definition of intelligence?

    3. What do multiple intelligences have to do with my classroom?

    4. How has M.I. theory developed since it was introduced in 1983?

    5. Who are the critics of this theory and what do they say?

    6. What are some benefits of using the multiple intelligences approach in my school?

    7. How can applying M.I. theory help students learn better?

    8. How can I find out more about M.I. theory?



In this section of the workshop, participants visit M.I. classrooms and join M.I. field trips by reading about and viewing some real-world examples. They are able to see how the multiple intelligence approach to a curriculum looks and operates in actual classroom and school settings.

    1. In the Classroom: A Video Journey
      a. Participants watch video clips of M.I. theory and philosophy being applied in the classroom.

    2. In the Schools: Some Online Examples
      a. Participants visit Web sites of schools that are putting multiple intelligences theory at the heart of school planning.

    3. What do M.I. Lesson Plans Look Like?
      a. Participants examine lesson plans for different grade levels that apply M.I. techniques to enhance the subject matter and enrich the lesson.



In this section of the workshop, participants explore practical options for getting students to begin to realize and develop their multiple intelligences. Through tips, guides, and strategies from theory experts and teachers, they will receive a good foundation for applying M.I. activities into their curriculum. The following questions are addressed:

    1. How will we explore multiple intelligences theory in the classroom?
      a. Participants examine three different ways a teacher can apply M.I. to the classroom curriculum in order to affect an understanding of knowledge.

    2. How do I apply multiple intelligences (M.I.) theory in my classroom?
      a. Participants examine a grid listing the classroom activities frequently used to activate and utilize more than one of the multiple intelligences.

    3. What are some simple ways to get started?
      a. Participants examine six strategies for applying M.I. theory to the class.

    4. What are some of the challenges I may face?
      a.Participants examine a few potential problem areas in the application of M.I. theory to the class.

    5. How do I assess students' progress?
      a. Participants examine the development of meaningful assessment tools for
      the class.

    6. How does the curriculum align with state and national standards?
      a. Participants examine how the application of multiple intelligence theory is congruent with major initiatives in the area of standards.

    7. How does technology complement the M.I. approach?
      a. Participants examine the ability of the World Wide Web to allow teachers as well as students to link related material representative of different intelligences such as slide shows, interactive animation, simulation, etc.

    8. How do I work with my school, the parents, and the community?
      a. Participants examine a comprehensive list of things they can do to involve families and the community in their schools.



In this section of the workshop, participants have the opportunity to apply multiple intelligences (M.I.) theory to their classrooms. Specifically, they will be provided with the framework necessary to develop their own M.I. lesson plan.


    1. Key Principles
      a. Participants examine three key principles of multiple intelligences (M.I.) theory to guide curriculum structure.

    2. Three Types of Implementation Exercises: Learning Centers, Simulations, and Presentations
      a. Participants examine three types of classroom teaching strategies that have their own complex structure and variation, yet are all conducive to targeting the multiple intelligences of students.

    3. Step-by-step M.I. Lesson Plan Guide
      a. Participants examine sets of questions to consider when developing each step of their M.I. lesson plan.



The following is a sample from the list of resources provided in the workshop:

Allen, David, ed. with foreword by Howard Gardner. ASSESSING STUDENT LEARNING: FROM GRADING TO UNDERSTANDING. NY: Teachers College Press, 1998.

Armstrong, Thomas. AWAKENING YOUR CHILD'S NATURAL GENIUS. NY: St. Martin's Press, 1991.

Armstrong, Thomas. AWAKENING GENIUS IN THE CLASSROOM. VA: ASDC, 1998.

Armstrong, Thomas. MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES IN THE CLASSROOM. VA: ASDC, 1994.

Caine, R.N., and G. Caine. EDUCATION ON THE EDGE OF POSSIBILITY. VA: ASCD, 1997.

Caine, R.N., and G. Caine. MAKING CONNECTIONS: TEACHING AND THE HUMAN BRAIN.

Campbell, Linda, Bruce Campbell, and Dee Dickinson. TEACHING AND LEARNING THROUGH MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES. MA: Allyn & Bacon, 1996.

CELEBRATING MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES and SUCCEEDING WITH MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES. MO: New City School, 1994.

Chapman, Carolyn. IF THE SHOE FITS . . . : DEVELOPING MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES IN THE CLASSROOM. Skylight Training and Publishing, Inc., 1993.

Chapman, Carolyn. MULTIPLE ASSESSMENTS FOR MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES. Skylight Training and Publishing, Inc.

Chapman, Carolyn, and Lynn Freeman. MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES CENTERS AND PROJECTS. Skylight

Gardner, Howard. CREATING MINDS: AN ANATOMY OF CREATIVITY SEEN THROUGH THE LIVES OF FREUD, EINSTEIN, PICASSO, STRAVINSKY, ELIOT, GRAHAM, AND GANDHI. NY: BasicBooks, 1994.

Gardner, Howard. FRAMES OF MIND: THE THEORY OF MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES. NY: BasicBooks, 1983.

Gardner, Howard, Mindy L. Kornhaber, and Warren K. Wake. INTELLIGENCE: MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES. Harcourt Brace College Publishers.

Gardner, Howard. INTELLIGENCE REFRAMED: MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCE FOR THE 21st CENTURY. NY: Basic Books, 1999.

Gardner, Howard. MULTIPLE INTELLIGENCES: THE THEORY IN PRACTICE. NY: BasicBooks, 1993.

Gardner, Howard. THE UNSCHOOLED MIND: HOW CHILDREN THINK & HOW SCHOOLS SHOULD TEACH. NY: BasicBooks, 1991.

Goodrich, Heidi, Thomas Hatch, Gwynne Wiatrowski, and Chris Unger. TEACHING THROUGH PROJECTS: CREATING EFFECTIVE LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS. Addison Wesley Longman.

Gould, Stephen Jay. FULL HOUSE: THE SPREAD OF EXCELLENCE FROM PLATO TO DARWIN. Harmony Books, 1996.

Gould, Stephen Jay. THE MISMEASURE OF MAN. W. W. Norton, 1996.

Gould, Stephen Jay. THE PANDA'S THUMB. W. W. Norton, 1992.

Haggarty, Brian. NURTURING INTELLIGENCES. Addison-Wesley.

Hirsch Jr., E.D. CULTURAL LITERACY. Vintage Books, 1988.

Ritchhart, Ron. MAKING NUMBERS MAKE SENSE: A SOURCEBOOK FOR DEVELOPING NUMERACY. Addison-Wesley Longman.

Sternberg, Robert J. BEYOND IQ: A TRIARCHIC THEORY OF INTELLIGENCE. NY: Cambridge University Press, 1985.

Weber, Ellen. ROUNDTABLE LEARNING: BUILDING UNDERSTANDING THROUGH ENHANCED M.I. STRATEGIES. AZ: Zephyr Press, 1997.

Weber, Ellen. STUDENT ASSESSMENT THAT WORKS: A PRACTICAL APPROACH. MA: Allyn & Bacon, 1999.

Weber, Ellen. CREATIVE LEARNING FROM INSIDE OUT. Vancouver, British Columbia: EduServ Inc., 1995.

Campbell, Linda. "Variations on a Theme: How Teachers Interpret M.I. Theory." EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP, vol. 55 (September 1997) .

Checkley, Kathy. "The First Seven . . . and the Eighth: A Conversation with Howard Gardner." EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP vol. 55 (September 1997).

Gardner, Howard, and Hatch, Thomas. "Multiple Intelligences Go to School" CTE Technical Report

Gardner, Howard, and Hirsch Jr., E.D., "Two Views on How to Get Johnny to Read and Think." New York Times. (September 11, 1999).

Hoerr, T., ed. "Intelligent Connections: Newsletter of the ASCD Network Teaching for Multiple Intelligences." New York City School, 5209 Waterman Ave., St. Louis, MO 63108.

Hyland, Aine., ed. "M.I. Bulletin." Dublin, Ireland: University College Cork.

Morris, C., ed. M.I.-News. Available at subscribe-mi-news@xc.org. Email newsletter from Multiple Intelligences Research and Consulting.

"Using Multiple Intelligences in Middle School Reading." FASTBACK 411.CS: Phi Delta Kappa Educational Foundation (1997) .

Proust, Marcel. REMEMBRANCE OF THINGS PAST.

Weber, Ellen. "Restructuring Education: Multiple Intelligences in High School Classes."

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