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Letter to Administrator
Syllabus
Rubric and List of Critera


In this section, we have provided you with the following tools to help you acquire professional development credit for this workshop. If you are interested, we suggest that you print these items and discuss them with your administrator.

Interdisciplinary Learning in Your Classroom Rubric

Heidi Hayes Jacobs, Ed.D. has developed a rubric that your administrator can use to assess your completion of the assignment in the Implementation section of this workshop. Please go to the Implementation section to print out this rubric.

List of Assessment Criteria

This suggested list of criteria can be used as a guide for an administrator when determining the level of integration of the workshop topic into the overall school curriculum over a greater period of time. This list can also be used as a guide for teacher self-assessment.

  1. The degree to which the teacher can define the rationale for implementing an interdisciplinary curriculum unit in the classroom.
  2. The degree to which the teacher can explain the qualitative difference between parallel disciplines and an interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  3. The degree to which a teacher can distinguish between a poorly designed cross-curricular unit and a truly successful interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  4. The degree to which a teacher collaborates with fellow teachers in designing and implementing an effective interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  5. The degree to which a teacher can recognize the benefits of planning interdisciplinary curriculum units in a self-contained classroom.
  6. The degree to which students are made aware of the meaningful connections that exist among a range of disciplines.
  7. The degree to which students' interests are linked to an interdisciplinary curriculum unit and serve as a basis on which to design interdisciplinary curriculum.
  8. The degree to which the interdisciplinary curriculum unit is based on real-world activities and is relevant to the students' lives.
  9. The degree to which a teacher can recognize the importance of assessing students' needs in designing effective interdisciplinary curriculum units.
  10. The degree to which student assessment is based on the student's ability to synthesize learning by pulling together evidence from multiple disciplines and in a variety of ways.
  11. The degree to which the students have the opportunity to develop a combination of higher-order thinking skills and discipline-based knowledge from the interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  12. The degree to which the interdisciplinary curriculum unit is based on principles of thinking that allow students to bridge disciplines and encourage the application of knowledge.
  13. The degree to which a teacher can identify relevant data for assessing the needs of the student population and incorporate the data into the interdisciplinary curriculum unit's design considerations.
  14. The degree to which a teacher references state and national standards in designing the interdisciplinary curriculum unit's content, skills and thinking skills, and assessments.
  15. The degree to which the teacher considers and lists specific obstacles that can mitigate the effectiveness of an interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  16. The degree to which a teacher assesses the school's programmed realities to identify enough time in the teaching schedule for sustained interdisciplinary learning.
  17. The degree to which a teacher can explain the importance of an organizing center in relation to the design of an interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  18. The degree to which a teacher can recognize the multiple formats through which an organizing center can be presented.
  19. The degree to which a teacher understands the link between selecting appropriate content formats and effectively meeting the developmental needs of the students.
  20. The degree to which a teacher uses the "concept wheel" to organize disciplines included in the model interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  21. The degree to which the teacher develops essential questions that relate to the organizing center as well spark curiosity and frame the scope and sequence of learning.
  22. The degree to which the teacher correlates a list of essential questions with a list of standards and assessment measures in order to determine the "best fit" between the two lists.
  23. The degree to which a teacher outlines a list of activities for the interdisciplinary curriculum unit based on the concept wheel, the integrated list of essential questions, skills and thinking skills, standards, and assessments.
  24. The degree to which the teacher develops lesson plans for the daily activities outlined in the interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  25. The degree to which a teacher develops a list of textual, multimedia, and community resources available to shape the daily activities of the interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  26. The degree to which a teacher completes a self-evaluation rubric to assess her/his understanding of the interdisciplinary curriculum unit.
  27. The degree to which a teacher develops a rubric that gives a clear definition of the grading criteria for student assessments within the interdisciplinary unit.
  28. The degree to which a teacher uses multiple sources of assessment data on students such as portfolios, grades, and performances.
  29. The degree to which a teacher scaffolds the day-to-day activities and student assessments in working towards a specific skill.
  30. The degree to which a teacher assesses the classroom environment and class setting to make sure that they are helpful in the design of the interdisciplinary curriculum unit.

Workshop: Interdisciplinary Learning in Your Classroom
Explanation | Demonstration | Exploration | Implementation | Get Credit

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