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Syllabus
     Explanation
    Demonstration
    Exploration
    Implementation
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Rubric and List of Critera

In this section, we have provided you with the following tools to help you acquire professional development credit for this workshop. If you are interested, we suggest that you print these items and discuss them with your administrator.

Syllabus

Concept to Classroom: Cooperative and Collaborative Learning

In this section of the workshop, participants examine the structural differences between cooperative and collaborative learning, how both differ from the traditional approach, why research supports the use of cooperative and collaborative learning, what cooperative grouping looks like in the classroom, and how cooperative learning can be integrated with other educational theories such as Multiple Intelligences. The following questions are addressed:
    1. What are the definitions of cooperative and collaborative learning?

    2. How do cooperative and collaborative learning differ from the traditional approach?

    3. How have cooperative and collaborative learning developed since they became popular?

    4. What are the benefits of cooperative and collaborative learning?

    5. What are some critical perspectives?

    6. How can I use cooperative and collaborative learning in conjunction with other educational techniques?




In this section, participants gain more experience with cooperative and collaborative learning by viewing examples of ongoing projects in classrooms and schools around the nation. Participants view real video footage and read audio transcripts, visit other Web sites, and examine sample curriculum units that use cooperative and collaborative learning.
    1. In the Classroom: A Video Journey of Cooperative Groups in Action
      a. Participants view collaborative learning techniques in a secondary science class.
      b. Participants view how collaborative student groups used technology.

    2. In Schools: Some Online Examples
      a. Participants visit Web sites of schools that are providing cooperative educational environments.

    3. What do cooperative lesson plans look like?
      a. Participants examine the components common to successful cooperative lessons.
      b. Participants examine the assessment criteria for cooperative learning projects.
      c. Participants explore two cooperative learning middle school projects.



In this section, participants explore practical options for forming different kinds of groups for specific purposes. Through tips, guides, and strategies from researchers and teachers, they will find a good range of group formations to chose from. The following questions are addressed:
    1. How does the instructor get started using cooperative and collaborative groups?
      a. Participants explore a step-by-step guide to using cooperative and collaborative groups in the classroom.

    2. What are the most effective small groups to use for different learning objectives?
      a. Participants review the different forms of cooperative group configurations.

    3. What are some challenges associated with cooperative learning?
      a. Participants examine what kinds of challenges come up in the classroom.
      b. Participants examine checklists that help students resolve small-group conflicts.

    5. How does the instructor assess students' progress?
      a. Participants examine rubrics that can assess students' progress.

    6. How can small-group projects involve parents and the community?
      a. Participants examine strategies to include parents' ideas.

    7. How can technology be used with cooperative and collaborative learning?
      a. Participants examine how students can share computers.



In this section, participants design a lesson plan focusing on cooperative and collaborative learning by following a step-by-step process that helps them form questions, identify goals, create rubrics, assign specific tasks, and reflect upon and readjust their lesson plans.
    1. Key Principles
      a. Participants examine the defined roles in cooperative grouping.

    2. Step-by-Step Lesson Planning
      a. Participants examine the five phases of the cooperative learning cycle.

    3. Lesson Plan Format
      a. Participants examine the ten steps of the cooperative learning lesson.



For a complete listing of all the books, articles, Web sites, and videos listed as resources for this workshop, please see http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/resources.html.

Cohen, G. DESIGNING GROUPWORK: STRATEGIES FOR THE HETEROGENEOUS CLASSROOM. New York: Teachers College Press, 1986.

Johnson, D.W. and R.T. Johnson. LEARNING TOGETHER AND ALONE. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice Hall, 1991.

Radencich, M. and L. McKay (eds.). FLEXIBLE GROUPING FOR LITERACY IN THE ELEMENTARY GRADES. Boston, Mass.: Allyn & Bacon, 1995.

Verduin, J.R., Jr. HELPING STUDENTS DEVELOP PROBLEM SOLVING AND INVESTIGATIVE SKILLS IN COOPERATIVE SETTINGS. Springfield, Ill.: Charles C. Thomas, 1996.

Weber, E. STUDENT ASSESSMENT THAT WORKS: A PRACTICAL APPROACH. Boston, Mass.: Allyn & Bacon, 1999.

Weber, E. ROUNDTABLE LEARNING: BUILDING UNDERSTANDING THROUGH ENHANCED MI STRATEGIES. Tuscon, AZ: Zephyr Press, 1997.

Antil, L., J. Jenkins, S. Wayne, and P. Vadasy. "Cooperative Learning: Prevalence, Conceptualizations, and the Relationship between Research and Practice." AMERICAN EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH JOURNAL 35, no.3 (1997): 419-454.



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Workshop: Cooperative and Collaborative Learning
Explanation | Demonstration | Exploration | Implementation | Get Credit

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