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Explanation Demonstration Exploration Implementation Get Credit


Letter to Administrator
Syllabus
Rubric and List of Critera

In this section, we have provided you with the following tools to help you acquire professional development credit for this workshop. If you are interested, we suggest that you print these items and discuss them with your administrator.



Assessment, Evaluation, and Curriculum Redesign Rubric

This rubric is for your administrator to use to assess your completion of the assignment in the Implementation section of this workshop.

1. Evaluate Current Teaching Methods The teacher thoroughly uses the self-evaluation checklist of teaching styles from the workshop to assess current teaching practices and their performance outcomes.

The teacher briefly uses the self-evaluation checklist of teaching styles from the workshop to assess current teaching practices and their performance outcomes. The teacher does not use the self-evaluation checklist of teaching styles from the workshop to assess current teaching practices or their performance outcomes.
2. Samples of Student Work

The teacher constructs the assessment rubric by collecting a range of student work samples that all respond to the same performance and skill assessment. The teacher begins to construct the assessment rubric by collecting a small range of student work samples that do not necessarily respond to the same performance and skill assessment.

The teacher has not yet begun constructing the assessment rubric and has not collected samples of student work that all respond to the same performance and skill assessment.
3. Assessment Criteria for the Rubric The teacher determines the criteria used to assess the student work samples and sorts these samples according to their specific traits. The teacher quickly determines the criteria used to assess the student work samples but does not carefully sort these samples according to their traits.

The teacher has not determined the criteria used to assess the student work samples and does not sort these samples according to their specific traits.
4. Assessment Parameters and Guidelines within the Rubric

The teacher thoroughly groups together related words or phrases to categorize and descriptively define each stack of student work samples and the range within each stack.

The teacher quickly groups together related words or phrases to categorize and define each stack of student work samples but the range within each stack is not very descriptive.

The teacher does not group together related words or phrases to categorize and define each stack of student work samples and the range within each stack.

5. Stating the Terms and Goals for Student Assessment in the Rubric

The teacher clearly defines what she/he wants the students to learn and clearly states the terms and goals for student assessment. The teacher is not very clear when defining what she/he wants the students to learn or when stating the terms and goals for student assessment. The teacher does not define what she/he wants the students to learn and does not state the terms or goals for student assessment.

6. Student-Directed Assessment

The students are actively involved in developing assessment measurements for the rubric along with the teacher.

The students are minimally involved in developing assessment measurements for the rubric along with the teacher.

The students are not actively involved in developing assessment measurements for the rubric along with the teacher.

7. Assessment Expectations The teacher makes sure that the students clearly understand the assessment expectations in the rubric by providing examples of the evaluation criteria and by showing samples of student work.

The teacher briefly makes sure that the students understand the assessment expectations in the rubric and does not provide sufficient examples of the evaluation criteria and samples of student work. The teacher does not make sure that the students clearly understand the assessment expectations in the rubric and does not provide examples of the evaluation criteria or show samples of student work.
8. Evaluative Terms for the Rubric

The teacher selects relevant terms, grades, or numbers for evaluative purposes in the rubric. The teacher selects a few terms, grades, or numbers for evaluative purposes in the rubric.

The teacher does not list any terms, grades, or numbers for evaluative purposes in the rubric.
9. Criteria for Assessment in the Rubric The teacher thoroughly develops the criteria for each specific aspect, target trait, or quality she/he wants to focus upon in the rubric. The teacher develops some of the criteria for each specific aspect, target trait, or quality she/he wants to focus upon in the rubric.

The teacher does not develop the criteria for each specific aspect, target trait, or quality that need focus in the rubric.
10. Rubric Indicators

The teacher uses descriptive terms to describe what performance looks like for each criterion and the multiple methods of meeting performances.

The teacher may use descriptive terms to describe what performance looks like, but not for each criterion, and does not include the multiple methods of meeting performances.

The teacher does not use descriptive terms to describe what performance looks like for each criterion, and does not include the multiple methods of meeting performances.

11. Rubric Illustrations

The teacher uses many different student work samples to illustrate major gradations of each criterion in order to exemplify the rating and clarify judgment calls. The teacher uses a few different student work samples to illustrate major gradations of each criterion in order to exemplify the rating and clarify judgment calls. The teacher does not use different student work samples to illustrate major gradations of each criterion in order to exemplify the rating and clarify judgment calls.

12. Curriculum Alignment

The teacher is engaged in curriculum planning by carefully considering the forms of assessment she/he intends to use to evaluate student work.

The teacher is beginning curriculum planning by briefly considering the forms of assessment she/he intends to use to evaluate student work.

The teacher does not do any curriculum planning and does not consider the forms of assessment she/he needs to use to evaluate student work.



List of Assessment Criteria

This suggested list of criteria can be used as a guide for an administrator when determining the level of integration of the workshop topic into the overall school curriculum over a greater period of time. This list can also be used as a guide for teacher self-assessment.

  1. The degree to which assessment measures the students' demonstration of learning.
  2. The degree to which assessment clearly defines the expected student outcomes.
  3. The degree to which students self-evaluate their own learning.
  4. The degree to which both formative and summative evaluation are used in the classroom.
  5. The degree to which assessment measure a full range of student learning.
  6. The degree to which a progressive theoretical framework guides assessment methods.
  7. The degree to which assessment is aligned with standards.
  8. The degree to which alternative forms of assessment are integrated into the classroom.
  9. The degree to which assessment exemplifies student expertise.
  10. The degree to which assessment is being used to understand student strengths.
  11. The degree to which portfolios are being used to collect student work.
  12. The degree to which evaluative criteria are established for portfolios.
  13. The degree to which assessment is woven into curriculum design and teaching strategies.
  14. The degree to which teachers provide an overview of what is being assessed before a unit begins.
  15. The degree to which students are involved in co-developing assessment criteria.
  16. The degree to which assessment is tied to intrinsic motivation.
  17. The degree to which assessment is balanced.
  18. The degree to which teachers examine assessment results.
  19. The degree to which assessment promotes educational equity.
  20. The degree to which journals are used to record student growth.
  21. The degree to which students provide each other peer feedback.
  22. The degree to which teachers are held accountable for their students' learning.
  23. The degree to which quality is addressed in reference to various assessment forms.
  24. The degree to which rubrics are modeled for the students before their use.
  25. The degree to which a conceptual framework is used to guide assessment development.
  26. The degree to which there is a logical progression of assessment measures.
  27. The degree to which assessment is being used to identify the gaps in the curriculum.
  28. The degree to which student work is assessed in relation to other student work.
  29. The degree to which parents are informed about their children's progress.
  30. The degree to which technology is used to track student progress.
  31. The degree to which there is continual feedback between teachers and students.
  32. The degree to which assessment is non-judgmental and non-biased.



Workshop: Assessment, Evaluation, and Curriculum Redesign
Explanation | Demonstration | Exploration | Implementation | Get Credit

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